James stewart 2009

James stewart 2009 DEFAULT

2009 Motocross Season

When we left 2008, James Stewart went 24-0 in the 450s and Ryan Villopoto crushed the 250 Class to win that title. Both riders, for different reasons, would not be defending their titles in 2009: Stewart signed a supercross-only deal with L&M Yamaha and Villopoto was moving on up to the 450 Class.

Villopoto served notice early that he was ready for the 450 class going 1-1 at the opening round at Glen Helen.

L&M Yamaha’s old rider, Chad Reed, switched to Suzuki for the 2009 season and just missed out on the indoor title to Stewart. Crushed by that loss, Reed decided at the last minute to line up for the outdoor season. It would be the first time he’d race outside in a few years, and it turned out to be a great decision.

At the opening round at Glen Helen, Villopoto served notice that his end-of-the-season supercross momentum was for real as he crushed the competition, going 1-1. RV’s second-moto win came at the expense of his longtime rival Mike Alessi, as Alessi had a big lead in the second moto and RV hunted him down.

At Hangtown, Villopoto’s knee, already having been damaged at some point, gave out in practice and that was it. RV struggled through the first moto before pulling the plug to get surgery. He was out for the rest of the year.

Picking up the gauntlet was Alessi, and the 800 was now the new man, as he won Hangtown with 1-1 scores and then dominated the next round in Texas. Now it was Alessi who looked to be the runaway favorite for the crown.

After Villopoto went down with a knee injury, Reed was there to pick up the pieces.

But just like RV, Alessi suffered some terrible misfortune when he crashed before round three and broke his kneecap. That was it for him, although he did try to come back for the next round; a collision with Josh Grant was the final KO. His season was done.

Reed started slowly at Glen Helen, got a little better at Hangtown, was the third-best guy in Texas (behind Honda’s Andrew Short, a perennial contender), and by High Point, the #22 Suzuki rider was getting his outdoor mojo back.

Honda’s Ivan Tedesco dominated Lakewood under the lights, JGR Yamaha’s Josh Grant put in two great rides to win Red-Bud, and all told there were six different winners, Reed taking the most with five. At one point Chad caught fire and won seven of eight motos to put a chokehold on the outdoor title. Reed, never considered an outdoor guy and having on record as not liking the outdoors, won his first national title, and along the way he gained appreciation for the motocross side of the sport and gained a ton of fans as well.

Pourcel and Ryan Dungey battled to the finish for the 250 class crown in 2009.

When we left the 250 Class, the only rider truly able to challenge Villopoto on the small bikes was Suzuki’s Ryan Dungey, and he was the favorite going into the series, but the Frenchman who won a 250 SX title, Christophe Pourcel, was better than most thought and was right there every weekend.

Pourcel, a gifted and smooth rider, was the only guy to give Dungey a run for his money, and soon those two riders began a battle that would last all summer. Dungey struck first with a Glen Helen win, Pourcel won Hangtown, Dungey got Texas, and Pourcel captured High Point. You can see where this is going, right?

The only racer to get in at times was Honda’s Trey Canard, who was in fact leading Pourcel at High Point and in position for the overall before crashing heavily over a triple and breaking his wrist. That was it for Canard and further established Dungey and Pourcel as 1 and 1a.

Weimer picked up his game late in the season taking three overall victories.

Kawasaki’s Jake Weimer stepped up in the summer of ’09. The Pro Circuit rider started off slow before winning two nationals in a row at Lakewood and RedBud. Weimer was fighting with Honda’s Brett Metcalfe for the final spot on the box most weekends and would go on to win the very muddy Budds Creek race as well near the end of the season.

Going into the penultimate round at Southwick, Pourcel held a slight lead in the points, but the deep sand of Southwick would prove too taxing for his machine and he DNF’d the first moto. In the second moto an early crash would hold the Frenchman back and that was it—his points lead turned into a deficit.

Matt Goerke took a surprising overall at Southwick in '09.

At the final round, Dungey rode behind Pourcel in both motos to clinch his first outdoor national title. Pourcel gave him everything he had, but in the end, the DNF was too much overcome.

It was a thrilling year in American Motocross and one that saw an unlikely champion in Reed and a coronation of another in Dungey.

Sours: https://vault.racerxonline.com/2009/mx/intro

James Stewart 2009 Hang Time

James Stewart Jr. was born December 21st 1985 in Bartow, Florida. He began his professional career racing in the 2002 Western Supercross Lites series and was voted AMA Supercross / Motocross Rookie for that Year. His championships include the 2002 & 2004 AMA Motocross Lites, 2003 AMA Western Supercross Lites, 2004 AMA Eastern Supercross Lites, 2006 & 2008 Motocross of Nations with team USA, 2006 FIM World Supercross, 2008 US Open Supercross, 2008 AMA Motocross Nationals as well as the 2007 & 2009 AMA Supercross titles.

This action photo which was taken during Stewart’s 2009 Championship winning AMA Supercross season captures him performing the “Nac Nac”

Hang Time was personally signed by James Stewart on the 19th of July 2009 in Haines City, Florida and is strictly limited to only 100 worldwide.

Each piece is backed by an Autographed Collectables 100% Guarantee of Authenticity which includes the signing date, location, edition size as well as a photo from the signing session.

Framed Size: 75 x 2.5 x 65cm / 30 x 1 x 26″

 

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.

Sours: https://signedandauthentic.com/product/james-stewart-2009-hang-time/
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James Stewart Jr.

American motorcycle racer

Stewart Anahiem04.jpg
Full nameJames Bubba Stewart
NationalityAmerican
Born (1985-12-21) December 21, 1985 (age 35)
Bartow, Florida
Height5 ft 7 in (1.70 m)[1]
Weight161 lb (73 kg)[1]
SportMotocross
Event(s)Supercross
World finals
  • 2006 FIM World Supercross Grand Prix Champion
  • 2007 FIM World Supercross Grand Prix Champion
  • 2006 Motocross of Nations Champion
  • 2008 Motocross of Nations Champion
  • 2009 FIM World Supercross Champion
Regional finals
  • 2003 AMA 125 West Supercross Champion
  • 2004 AMA 125 East Supercross Champion
National finals
  • 2002 AMA 125 Motocross National Champion
  • 2004 AMA 125 Motocross National Champion
  • 2007 AMA Supercross Champion
  • 2008 AMA Motocross National Champion
  • 2009 AMA Supercross Champion
Updated on July 30, 2009.

James Stewart Jr. (born December 21, 1985), also affectionately known as Bubba Stewart, is an American former professional motocross racer who competed in the AMA Motocross and the AMA Supercross Championships. Through his years of racing, he earned the nickname "The Fastest Man on The Planet", due to his extraordinary talent, speed, athleticism and innovation.

In 2008 James won every race and every moto of the AMA Motocross season. The only other person to do this is Ricky Carmichael, who had perfect seasons in 2002 and 2004. James is second in all time 450 Supercross wins (50), and second all time in AMA outdoor national wins (48). He is also known for innovating the "Bubba Scrub" or just "scrub", which revolutionized the sport and became a fundamental skill needed to compete in Professional Motocross. He was the first to host his own television show Bubba's World which brought even more attention to the sport. He is arguably the most financially lucrative racer, bringing in endorsement deals paying him over $10M a year throughout his career. Known for his vibrant personality and big smile, James has been featured in news outlets like Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Maxim, ESPN The Magazine, GQ and many more. Additionally, Teen People named him one of "20 Teens Who Will Change the World". He has the record for best rookie season, having won 10/12 Motocross races in 2002.

James has five FIM World Champion titles from Motocross of Nations, and World Supercross. Four AMA Supercross Champion titles, and three AMA Motocross Champion titles. He won the Red Bull Straight Rhythm in both 2014 and 2015. James is a motocross legend who has battled the greats of multiple eras, and is one of the most popular riders of all time.

Career[edit]

Amateur and Lites Class[edit]

Stewart was born in Bartow, Florida[1] and currently resides in Haine City Lake Hamilton, Florida.[2] His father, James Sr., was a motocross enthusiast and introduced his son to the sport at the age of three. Stewart entered his first motocross race when he was four years old.[3]

Having 84 amateur wins and 7 Loretta Lynn's Amateur Championships all before the age of 16, he debuted as pro in 2002. While crashes and rookie mistakes kept him from winning the 2002 125 West Supercross title, he finished 2nd overall. He went on to dominate the 2002 Motocross Championship, and was named the 2002 AMA Rookie of the Year.[3] He was also named one of "20 Teens Who Will Change the World" in the April 2003 issue of Teen People magazine.

Stewart went on to win the 2003 125 West Supercross Championship and the 125 East/West Shootout in Las Vegas, Nevada.

In 2004 he won both the 125 East Supercross title and the 125 Outdoor national title, only losing one moto to Mike Brown in the latter due to a broken clutch cover.

1 of 2 riders in history to win every moto/race in season Ranked #2 all time SX wins (50). Ranked #3 all time pro AMA wins (98). X games medal for best whip. 2002 AMA 125 Motocross national champion. 2003 AMA 125 West Supercross Champion. 2004 AMA 125 East Supercross Champion. 2004 AMA 125 Motocross National Champion. 2006 FIM World Supercross Grand Prix Champion. 2006 Motocross of Nations Champion. 2007 AMA Supercross Champion. 2007 FIM World Supercross Grand Prix Champion. 2008 AMA Motocross National Champion. 2008 Motocross of Nations Champion. 2009 AMA Supercross Champion. 2009 FIM World Supercross Champion. 2014 Redbull Straight Rhythm Champion. 2015 Redbull Straight Rhythm Champion

Supercross[edit]

On April 2, 2005, at Texas Stadium (in only his 3rd Supercross race), Stewart captured his very first Supercross victory. He would go on to record many more victories throughout 2005 and 2006, and he eventually won the 2007 Supercross Championship. He was unable to finish the 2007 National series due to a knee injury.

Year Rnd
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Average
Finish
Podium
Percent
Place
2006 SX 1 3 3 1 8 1 17 3 2 6 1 1 1 2 1 1 3.25 75% 2nd
2007 SX 1 1 1 2 1 1 5 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1.38 94% 1st

2008[edit]

Stewart missed the last 15 races of the 2008 Supercross season due to a knee injury caused by a crash into Dale White #7.[3]

2009[edit]

Stewart signed with L&M Yamaha racing for the 2009 season, replacing Chad Reed for the supercross season. In the latter season Stewart and Chad Reed were involved in the tightest (and sometimes heated) points race of Stewart's career. Stewart won 11 of the 17 events. On May 2, 2009, at Sam Boyd Stadium in Las Vegas, Stewart won the 2009 Supercross Championship by a margin of 4 points over Reed (377-373).

Year Rnd
1
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Average
Finish
Podium
Percent
Place
2009 SX 19 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 7 1 2 1 1 2 1 3 4.53 88% 1st

2010[edit]

After a strong charge by Supercross class rookie Ryan Dungey at the opening round at Anaheim, Stewart captured the lead on lap 18, going on to take the win . In round 2, Stewart was involved in a crash during his heat, but came back to win the Last Chance Qualifier. In the final, a collision with Chad Reed caused both riders to fall. Reed's left hand was pinned under Stewart and Reed pushed Stewart's head off his arm, in what some deemed to be a physically aggressive manner. Controversy followed in the pits when Stewart pushed Reed's bike off its stand, resulting in an official warning from the AMA.[4] Still struggling with injury Stewart finished 3rd behind Ryan Dungey and Josh Hill in round 3. Stewart retired from the season after having surgery from Dr. Arthur Ting for a broken right scaphoid.[5]

Stewart's wrist injury took longer than expected to heal, leaving him out of the 2010 Motocross series, although he did return for one round at Unadilla where he placed third in the first moto and retired early from the second moto,[6] citing bike setup issues and exhaustion.[7]

2011[edit]

On January 8, 2011 Stewart made his return to Supercross placing 3rd in the Anaheim season opener. The next week at Phoenix on January 15, he won his first main event in over a year, leading all 20 laps over Ryan Villopoto, who trailed close behind for most of the race. Throughout the season Stewart suffered several crashes with his last big crash in the season finale at Las Vegas where he had the lead but then crashed in the whoops. He took out Kevin Windham along with him, allowing Villopoto and Reed to pass [8]

2012[edit]

On March 10, 2012 Stewart claimed his 44th Supercross win by taking 1st place at Daytona International Speedway.[9] At the end of the season, Stewart left Joe Gibbs Motocross Racing.[10]

2013[edit]

On January 5, 2013, after an unsuccessful finish of the 2012 AMA Motocross Series, Stewart made his return to Supercross with his new Yoshimura Suzuki bike. Although having a sore right knee and in pain, he finished 8th in the Main Event at the Anaheim season opener. He got back up in Atlanta winning the main event, leading all 20 laps. Throughout the season, Stewart had several crashes, including at the Metrodome, in Minneapolis, where he had the lead in the Heat Race, but crashed in the rhythm section near the Mechanics Area. He did come back with a win in the LCQ. In the Main Event, Stewart was injured again, this time tweaking his wrist and retired on Lap 7. Consequently, Stewart was out for the remainder of the three rounds of the 2013 AMA Supercross Series.[11]

On October 19, 2013 Stewart raced the Monster Energy Cup for the first time at Sam Boyd Stadium in Las Vegas. Having a bad start in the first heat, he fought up to 8th. In the second heat he took the holeshot and was battling hard with Villopoto, beating Villopoto due to a hard crash on the Last Lap after missing the Joker Lane. In the third heat, James fought hard past Ken Roczen and took the 3rd moto win. On the Final Lap, Stewart took the Joker Lane twice on second and third Motos, before crossing the finish line. He won the overall and the $100,000 payout

2014[edit]

Coming off an overall win in the Monster Energy Cup, Stewart was now a title threat for the 2014 Supercross Championship. On January 4, 2014 at Angel Stadium at A1 Stewart started mid pack and worked his way up to leader Ken Roczen. With only 5 laps to go, he had a big crash in the whoops. He would finish seventeenth. At San Diego on February 8, he won his first main event for 2014 and went on to win 5 more main events, including a win in Toronto to pass Ricky Carmichael for second in all-time wins in Supercross. Stewart made the podium 8 times and finished the season in 3rd place.

2015[edit]

Stewart was suspended for 16 months for failing an anti-doping test. Stewart, who is medically prescribed Adderall, failed to submit the proper paperwork for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).[12] Stewart missed the entire 2015 Supercross season and the 2015 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship series.

Following his suspension, Stewart returned to race the single-day Monster Energy Cup in Las Vegas, NV. After a crash in the first of three rounds however, Stewart did not start the following motos.

2016[edit]

Stewart returned for Anaheim 1 at the start of the 2016 Supercross season. However, in the main event a first lap mishap by Ryan Dungey caused Stewart to crash. Stewart was knocked unconscious and suffered a concussion. Stewart did not return to racing after this injury, and an official retirement would later be announced.

2019[edit]

On May 17, 2019, Stewart announced his retirement. “Where I’m at in my life, I think it’s time to say I’m retiring. I’ve retired,” he said in part. “It’s hard for sure, because I love racing and I love the fans, I love the opening ceremonies, I love the autograph lines, but I don’t miss the sweat and tears and training and having to feel like you have to win every race and having to be James Stewart. I don’t love doing that anymore.”

Motocross class[edit]

2005[edit]

AMA 250 class 10th overall [13]

2006[edit]

AMA 4th overall [14]

2007[edit]

AMA 7th overall [15]

2008[edit]

Having missed the entire Supercross season, he returned to racing at the first round of the outdoor nationals and went on to win all 24 motos and thus the championship.

Year Rnd
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Average
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Place
2008 MX 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1.00 100% 1st

2009[edit]

Stewart did not compete in the 2009 Motocross series.[16]

2010[edit]

A wrist injury sustained in the Supercross season prevented Stewart from competing in the 2010 Motocross series although he did return for one round at Unadilla where he placed second in the first moto and retired early from the second moto,[6] citing bike setup issues and exhaustion.[7]

2011[edit]

Stewart chose not to race the 2011 National season citing lack of preparation.[17]

2012[edit]

One day after announcing his split from JGRMX and Yamaha, Stewart signed to ride with Yoshimura Suzuki aboard their RMZ-450. Stewart won the first four motos of the season. However, during Round 3 of Thunder Valley in Colorado, Stewart was leading when he crashed. The result of the crash was a serious injury is his right hand breaking his wrist. Consequently, he was unable to finish the rest of the Motocross series due to the extent of the injury. Though he did come back at some point in Red Bud, but due to multiple injuries, Stewart will not race for the rest of the 2012 AMA Motocross Series until he gets 100% healthy.[18]

2013[edit]

The 2013 Season was a three-way battle with Stewart, Ryan Villopoto and Ryan Dungey. Chad Reed was thought to be the main show for the title, even though he struggled to ride hard and pass for the lead. Throughout the season, Stewart had several crashes including Motocross 338 in Southwick, Massachusetts, where he had the lead halfway through, but crashed in the sand section in Moto 1 ending up finishing in 34th place. He did come back to finish 4th in Moto 2 making him 5th place overall. Stewart struggles to ride hard, riding though a neck injury.

-

Total career AMA wins[edit]

  • 28 wins in 125/250 AMA Motocross 10-2002 7-2003 11-2004
  • 50 wins in 450 AMA Supercross 3-2005 8-2006 13-2007 1-2008 11-2009 1-2010 5-2011 2-2012 1-2013 5-2014
  • 20 wins in 250/450 AMA Motocross 3-2006 1-2007 12-2008 2-2012 1-2013 1-2014
  • 98 total AMA wins 10-2002 7-2003 11-2004 3-2005 11-2006 14-2007 13-2008 11-2009 1-2010 5-2011 4-2012 2-2013 5-2014

X Games[edit]

Stewart made his X Games debut on July 30, 2009 at X Games XV, and placed second in the best whip competition with 21% of the votes winning his first X Games medal.[19]

He suffered a deep bruise to his bone and muscle in his left shoulder during seeding trials for SuperMoto on July 31, forcing him to drop out of the games.[20]

Reality TV show[edit]

On March 28, 2010 Stewart's reality show “Bubba’s World” debuted and ran 10 episodes. The show got mixed reviews, due in part to Stewart’s somewhat self-centered actions throughout the show. The second season started in December, offered 13 episodes and concluded Feb. 24. There has been no announcement about a third season.[21]

Gibbs and NASCAR[edit]

In October 2011, Stewart signed to race for Joe Gibbs Racing, with a multiyear contract to run for JGRMX in motocross as well as plans to run NASCARstock car races in the K&N Pro Series East and Nationwide Series.[22] At the end of the 2012 Supercross Season, Stewart left Joe Gibbs Racing and JGRMX. Stewart said that he would be open to racing with Gibbs in the future, but stated that he wanted to get back to being competitive in motorcycle racing, and that a change was necessary.[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abchttp://www.motorcycle-usa.com/493/1094/Motorcycle-Article/James-Stewart-Bio.aspx
  2. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-07. Retrieved 2009-07-31.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ abc"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-07-31. Retrieved 2009-07-31.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^http://www.motoonline.com.au/2010/01/17/ama-sx-dungey-wins-in-phoenix-reed-and-stewart-clash/
  5. ^Hilderbrand, JC (2010-01-30). "James Stewart Out for San Francisco SX". motorcycle-usa.com. Retrieved 2010-01-31.
  6. ^ abhttp://www.motorcycle-usa.com/751/7724/Motorcycle-Article/2010-AMA-Motocross-Unadilla-Results.aspx
  7. ^ abhttp://www.vitalmx.com/news/press-release/Team-San-Manuel-Yamahas-James-Stewart-Withdraws-from-the-Motocross-Outdoor-National-Series-Race-Series,7922
  8. ^[1]
  9. ^"Stewart Storms To Daytona Win". SPEED Channel. Fox Sports. March 10, 2012. Archived from the original on March 12, 2012. Retrieved 2012-03-11.
  10. ^Leistikow, Chad (May 6, 2012). "Supercross star James Stewart splits with Joe Gibbs Racing". USA Today. Retrieved May 7, 2012.
  11. ^Poelman, Ryan. "JAMES STEWART OUT FOR REMAINDER OF 2013 SUPERCROSS SEASON". supercross.com. Supercross.com, LLC. Retrieved 2 September 2015.
  12. ^http://www.vitalmx.com/features/Breaking-News-James-Stewart-Suspended,3666
  13. ^http://vault.racerxonline.com/2005/mx/points
  14. ^http://vault.racerxonline.com/2006/mx/points
  15. ^http://vault.racerxonline.com/2007/mx/points
  16. ^http://vault.racerxonline.com/rider/james-stewart/races
  17. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-31. Retrieved 2011-08-03.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  18. ^Waheed, Adam. "James Stewart Signs with Yoshimura Suzuki". Motorcycle USA. Retrieved May 7, 2012.
  19. ^[2]
  20. ^"Outposts". The Los Angeles Times. July 31, 2009.
  21. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-04-01. Retrieved 2011-03-30.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  22. ^Ryan, Nate (October 24, 2011). "Motocross' James Stewart joins Gibbs team with eye on NASCAR". USA Today. McLean, VA: Gannett Co. Retrieved 2011-10-26.
  23. ^Leistikow, Chad (May 6, 2012). "Supercross star James Stewart splits with Joe Gibbs Racing". USA Today.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Stewart_Jr.
James Stewart Yamaha Answer 2010

I saw him near me. He fell on me and passed out on the march. I got up and tidied up a little and waited for him to wake up, he reminded me of a little kitten. So white. He said that I would go up to him and kiss him, take off his panties and see a huge penis.

2009 james stewart

She licked the rest of the sperm from her hand and was very disappointed that she was no longer there. Billy, watching this scene, got excited again and said. Amy knelt down and licked his shaft and balls until they were completely clean of cum. When she finished, she began to lick his belly and thighs, hoping that she might have missed a little.

#throwback // Anaheim 1 2009 - 450 Main Event

The wine had already hit my head a little and it was easy and pleasant to feel my body in different hands, warm. And excited. But at the same time, who did not allow himself anything superfluous, His name was Eugene and he was a programmer. He was a man - rather tall, thick, with a mane of long hair and a thick beard.

The type is of course colorful and strange, like all IT specialists and programmers.

Similar news:

Said the people, quit jerking off cocks and left for their homes. Submitting to the creepy bird, not even a day has passed, half the country has come cunt. We began to think together how to save ourselves from the fucking thing. What should we do, how should we be.

- the question was posed bluntly, to stay to live at least three.



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