Everbilt insert nut

Everbilt insert nut DEFAULT

World of Wood Woodworking Forum > The Flatwork Shop > General Woodworking > What size hole for wood insert nuts


PDA

View Full Version : What size hole for wood insert nuts



Elizabeth

03-23-2014, 1:04 pm

I need to install some wood insert nuts but the packaging doesn't say what size hole to drill. They are 1/4-20 to fit a #8 (1/4") bolt. They are brass and have an outside thread. I'm planning to install them using the method JohnBoy posted in the Tips thread.

Do I drill like for any screw? one size smaller than the outside diameter? The threads on these nuts looked wicked....

Thanks.


Cody Colston

03-23-2014, 1:51 pm

I need to install some wood insert nuts but the packaging doesn't say what size hole to drill. They are 1/4-20 to fit a #8 (1/4") bolt. They are brass and have an outside thread. I'm planning to install them using the method JohnBoy posted in the Tips thread.

Do I drill like for any screw? one size smaller than the outside diameter? The threads on these nuts looked wicked....

Thanks.

I used threaded brass inserts in the guitar stand to receive 1/4"-20 hanger bolts that I screwed/epoxied into the ends of the support dowels and the yoke so that they would be removable.

I used a 25/64 bit to drill the holes and then screwed in a 5/16" (?) lag bolt with the tip ground flat to cut threads for the insert. The lag screw had the same thread pattern as the insert.

The first insert I tried to screw in without using the lag screw, I broke off the screwdriver slot. That brass won't take much force trying to insert it. After I cut threads with the lag screw it screwed in easily. I put a dab of 5-minute epoxy on the insert threads to lock it in place.


deepsplinter

03-23-2014, 2:05 pm

I use those threaded inserts now and then. I find them aggravating to get in.

My only advice.... use a set up similar to Johnboy's, buy a few extras, and practice on some scrap.

If you can find something with threads like your outside diameter threads, use it first. (like Cody did)

Good luck.


Elizabeth

03-23-2014, 3:53 pm

Thank you, both. I don't know what a lag bolt is but I'll see what I can root up in the shop with the same pattern.

I'll do test holes....


art3427

03-23-2014, 5:47 pm

Gauge the bottom end of the insert with a bit gauge. The bottom end is the one that has slots in it like for a straight screwdriver. They are NOT for that purpose! They are actually cutting edges designed to size the hole for a correct minor dia. for the threads that follow. Use the bit that matches what the bit gauge says, or (slightly smaller but never larger). Most retail packaging actually gives the bore size right on the package somewhere.

Now, for driving you need a bolt and nut that matches the insert's internal thread. Run the nut up the bolt about the same distance as the insert is long. Now thread the insert onto the bolt up to the nut. Now you can use the bolt to drive the insert home. If you are concerned about the nut marring your wood surface just put a flat washer between the nut and insert. It will still drive the insert flush but will not rotate on the surface of the wood. Once the insert is seated just reverse the bolt out of the insert and your done. Cody's use of the lag bolt is good if you are in some really dense wood. But for normal situations threading is not necessary (IMO, apologies to Cody) as the insert is designed to be self threading externally. Adding adhesive is a good idea in any case.

Good to be hearing from you again.:top:

May all your boards be straight, your bits sharp and nails never bend,


Johnboy

03-23-2014, 7:10 pm

Cody and Dave gave some excellent advise. There are three points I would add.

1. After you drill the hole, use a chamfering bit to slightly ease the edge. This allows the insert to start easier; particularly if the top layer is Formica. Formica has a tendency to form a ridge during the drilling process. If at all possible I'd use a brad point bit to drill the hole since it scores the edge.

2. While it is possible to use a hex headed bolt with double nuts and a ratchet to screw the inserts in, it is much easier with a T-handle like the one in this link. The long handle of a ratchet moves the center of gravity thus making the insert harder to start straight.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2001048/2809/T-Wrench-for-14-20-Inserts.aspx

3. The key is to drill a hole that is perpendicular to the material's face which, if possible, should be done on a drill press. In my early woodworking years and before I had a drill press I purchased one of those gizmos that attaches to a drill turning it into an el cheapo delux drill press similar to the one in this link:

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2003121/11022/Precision-Drill-Guide.aspx

Don't remember paying more than ten bucks for it though! Sometimes you can pick them up at a garage sale or CL.


What I normally do is use a drill press and a hex bolt with the head cut off.

On the bolt thread nut, then a washer then a second nut. Put a couple of washers on the bolt and then the threaded insert. Put the bolt in the drill press and use the drill press for square pressure. Use a wrench to thread the insert into the wood.

BTW - Rockler suggests 3/8" for a pilot hole but I use 25/64" (For brass and hard wood, 13/32" may be a better choice.) and paraffin wax the insert before inserting.


TDHofstetter

03-24-2014, 12:49 pm

Good approach, Rich - it's extremely important to get the insert to start threading its way into the wood as straight & perpendicular as possible. Once it's started, it'll continue along the same path until it either is fully seated or jams. If it's started "cocked", it's much more likely to jam and end up a little askew if it seats fully at all.

It's very much like tapping metal - if the tap doesn't get started very accurately down the drilled hole, it'll be troublesome; that's how a great many good taps get broken, and it's a good reason to use a drill press or a (manual or powered) tapping machine to do the job. Manual tapping machines are simple things that force the tap into alignment with the hole...

...and so I got to thinking about using a wooden jig for these insert nuts, one that would force the insert into good alignment with the hole and still permit driving them by hand - the hand driving provides good "sensitivity". The drill press approach Rich uses is excellent for that purpose, with very little (or no) jigging required unless the inserts are being driven into end grain.

EDIT: Just as with tapping metal, if your drill press has a key for the power switch... remove that key and set it aside while you're driving inserts. If you fail to do that... sooner or later, you WILL forget and turn on the drill press. Everybody does, sooner or later. EVERYBODY.


Elizabeth

03-24-2014, 3:48 pm

Thank you so much for all the suggestions. I looked for a bolt with the same thread and couldn't find it. I don't know what a lag bolt is...

I am going into Formica/MDF so I'll make sure to chamfer the edge! Thanks!

The BOTTOM end is the one with the slot for (what I thought) a screwdriver???? That end goes in first and pick a drill that size? Thanks for the tip! I would have done it backwards!!!!

Packaging says nothing of bore size. It's much smaller than a 3/8th. Two sizes less.

I will use the drill press method.

The conundrum: I'm wanting to put these inserts into my crosscut sled so I can have a detachable bridge. Went to Lowes and got the threaded rod, the red "glue" and knobs. I measured my sled panels against the length of the insert and they are exactly the same size. Will probably have to file the insert after placement so I don't scratch the table surface.

I also discovered I need to replace my sled panels... They've warped so I no longer have a flat surface, nor can I square the blade to both sides.

At least I now know what I have to do.

Thanks so much! Cousin here. Gotta go for now


Cody Colston

03-24-2014, 7:52 pm

I would have done it backwards!!!!

I did! :laugh::laugh::laugh:

Thanks for the instructions, Art.


Elizabeth

03-25-2014, 1:56 am

Saved by the bell!? :laugh:


Gauge the bottom end of the insert with a bit gauge. The bottom end is the one that has slots in it like for a straight screwdriver. They are NOT for that purpose! They are actually cutting edges designed to size the hole for a correct minor dia. for the threads that follow. Use the bit that matches what the bit gauge says, or (slightly smaller but never larger). Most retail packaging actually gives the bore size right on the package somewhere.


Really? ? ?

How would you remove the insert if need be with the slotted end inserted first?

When I worked at Rockler there was a weird screwdriver thing for installing threaded inserts. I always suggested the sawed off bolt thing, much to the irritation the assistant manager.

Next time I'm going to try the slot end first installation. You have my attention now.


TDHofstetter

03-25-2014, 2:11 pm

How would you remove the insert if need be with the slotted end inserted first?

Same way you install it - with a jamnut.

BTW, a coupling (as for threaded rod) is usually smaller than a nut for the same thread, and so makes a convenient jamnut. Not all couplings are equivalent, though - a few are the same size as a nut.

You don't turn the coupling with a wrench to unscrew the insert, though - you have to turn the BOLT to do that. You may have to hold tension on the coupling with a wrench while you're unscrewing the insert, to keep it jammed against the insert.


Maybe I'm misinterpreting what is being described.

My impression from this thread is that after you drill a pilot hole, the slotted end of the insert goes in first (using whatever method suggested here). If you look at JohnBoy's link to the T-wrench (at Woodcraft), they show an insert imbedded into a piece of wood and the slotted end is showing as if it was inserted with exactly the opposite orientation.

Or can inserts be installed either with the slotted end inserted first or not?

--- Rion


Cody Colston

03-25-2014, 2:51 pm

Or can inserts be installed either with the slotted end inserted first or not?

--- Rion


They can go in with the slot up and work fine...I have recent empirical evidence to prove it. However, after reading Art's post, I googled the subject and a couple of how-to articles from the wood mags both showed the insert being installed with the slotted end first.

The guitar stand was the first time I had used them and I assumed the slot was for using a screwdriver to insert them. I quickly discovered that the brass slot was too weak to cut threads in Elm so that's when I hunted through my bolt bin and came up with the lag bolt idea for cutting the threads first. (btw, it was a 3/8" bolt) After I did that, they screwed in fine.

Next time I try something new, I'll do a little how-to research FIRST. :D


Thx Cody.

Art's explanation makes perfect sense in that the insert's slot acts like a tap to cut threads into the smooth pilot hole.

--- Rion


Next time I'm going to have to try slotted end first.


I found this interesting.

http://www.rockler.com/power-drive-threaded-insert-tool-power-drive-threaded-insert-tool

Especially at the bottom left corner of the page. :laugh:

I'm still going to try slot first just to see which works better.


TDHofstetter

03-25-2014, 6:37 pm

They definitely LOOK cleaner & more refined with the slot down/in.


Cody Colston

03-25-2014, 6:37 pm

I think in a soft wood the insert driver would work fine...not so fine in a hard wood.


Beamer

03-26-2014, 2:32 am

Did i see MDF?

I wouldn't trust any threads in MDF - especially inserts.

Personally, I've seen at least a half dozen varieties and i doubt the screw driver slot is meant to be anything remotely resembling a thread chaser or borer or whatever. I think that may just be woodworking folklore, myself.

I have 3 different brass ones - one with burrs instead of actual threads (though they're in a spiral shape) and has an allen head. Another is tapered slightly on the non-screw end, presumably to tell you "this end first". And a third as flat off that end, lending possible credence to the upside-down method (which i am not sold on).

But we're talking wrong tool for the job here, in my opinion.

Inserts in MDF have NEVER (I'll say it again, NEVER) yielded success for me - even with the lightest pressure of a small thumb screw barely putting any torque down on it. The insert shreds the MDF in very short order (even the nice deep/wide threads of the steel ones i have) and they're useless. Drizzling CA glue only left me with a larger spun out hole and offered ZERO holding power for the threaded insert.


PERSONALLY

If it were ME and I wanted to really be able to trust that thread, I'd find a way to actually bolt from the other side or use some of those nice flange-like T-nuts (not the ones with the spikes, the ones with the flanges) from the other side.

Even if it means counter boring the backside so you have nothing protruding, I would use almost anything but threaded inserts in MDF.


TDHofstetter

03-26-2014, 2:55 am

Good eye, Jason - I hadn't spotted that, but there it is, in Post #9.

I agree - inserts aren't much good in MDF. They'd be fine embedded into a piece of real natural-grain wood glued to the backside of that same MDF, though. They'd really need to be driven very straight, though, so the screws line up with the threaded bores.


Elizabeth

03-26-2014, 5:19 pm

OOHH! Yikes!

The whole purpose of this is so I can remove the bridge at the front end of the crosscut sled in order to disassemble it when not in use. I don't have room to have a permanent dedicated sled. Actually, I'd need two. One for 90 * the other for 45* As is, all I have to do is unscrew the two 45* panels and screw in the 90*, and vice versa.

Boring from underneath. What kind of nut are we talking about??? Thanks!

Whenever I've run a hex head bolt from underneath in any thing, I can't really tighten what it's meant to hold because the bolt keeps turning in its hole...

Sorry, guys. Kind of a mess now with distractions... :(


Beamer

03-26-2014, 5:30 pm

The "bridge" is solid wood, right?

So put the inserts in that, use a flat-head screw from up underneath and countersink it so it's not a problem.


deepsplinter

03-26-2014, 6:27 pm

Will some of these work for ya, Liz?

19764

They have ¼-20 threads, and can be used on ½" thick (or more) material.

I have a peanut butter jar full of 'em. You're welcome to a few.

Say the word, and I'll get 'em on the way.


TDHofstetter

03-26-2014, 6:57 pm

For that purpose... the sled's bridge really SHOULD have a set of locating pins / dowels, too, for really positive registration at the design angle(s), so you're not relying on bolts through slightly oversized holes to provide that crucial angle registration. Relying on bolts alone may get ya a couple degrees of play.

Or... leave that fence alone as a 90-degree sled & make a 45-degree triangle to ride on it. While you're there, you could also make a 60-degree triangle and a 22.5-degree one. The triangles store easily (drill a big hole through each & hang 'em on a wall or stick 'em to the TS's stand with magnets), and add a lot of precise versatility to your one fixed sled.


Elizabeth

03-27-2014, 1:29 pm

The "bridge" is solid wood, right?

So put the inserts in that, use a flat-head screw from up underneath and countersink it so it's not a problem. Hadn't thunk of that! I was hoping to avoid having to go from underneath but there may not be another alternative. I'm crossing my fingers that the inserts Dave shows will work on MDF????? Thanks!


Will some of these work for ya, Liz?

19764

I saw them at Lowe's but opted for the brass ones because they looked easier to install. Would these work with the MDF? If so, I can get them locally. You're a tweedy for offering to send me some. Thanks!


For that purpose... the sled's bridge really SHOULD have a set of locating pins / dowels, too, for really positive registration at the design angle(s), so you're not relying on bolts through slightly oversized holes to provide that crucial angle registration. Relying on bolts alone may get ya a couple degrees of play. That's a really cool suggestion! I wouldn't have to make bridge after bridge when it wears out. Definitely adding pins to the bridge. I only need a 90 and a 45 so wouldn't need wedges though that's a cool concept. Thanks!


Beamer

03-27-2014, 3:13 pm

Personally? i don't like the inserts with the spikes on them. I've spun a few too many out. MDF has no structure to it, really, and since you have to counter bore those into the surface so they don't protrude, you're relying only on the flimsy inner powdery MDF to hold ... I wouldn't trust 'em.

I'm not trying to poo on all the ideas, I just don't trust MDF to hold anything if it really needs to stay put. Bitten too many times, i guess. The only way I trust MDF to hold a threaded *anything* is if it's like a barrel nut or something like that (and even then, i'm dubious). They have their limits, too.

If it were me, I would be approaching this from the idea of attaching the MDF *to* the other parts. Not attaching the parts *to* the MDF. Let the fasteners hold where they have the best chance of holding.


Those spiked T-nuts work okay in solid wood - though I've found them oddly temperamental with their actual machine threads. They are the only thread I've ever crossed, and consistently so. Maybe it's just me - but i can't cross a tapped thread, or a nut, or a brass insert, but i am awesome at crossing T-nut threads for some reason.




Not to distract from the fastener discussion - did i also see you say you were having formica on the surface? you're doing BOTH surfaces, right? If not, I wouldn't count on it staying flat.

If you're going to laminate something, it's always more predictable to treat both faces the same. It's cheap insurance. I've been there, done that.


Just an off the wall hint. . . .

When you install the threaded inserts, coat the inside of the hole with Tite Bond-III. When the TB-III cures, the insert will be one with the MDF. Which also means that to remove the insert means destruction.

The "T" nuts (a.k.a. The ones with spikes) are almost guaranteed to spin out.

Also, MDF is not a good choice for anything structural with pressure applied by a screw type of clamping system. The MDF will fail at the screw and gradually mushroom. I have a commercially made drill press table. The connection method is star knobs, levers and screws. I never paid much attention but after a year or so the MDF failed with the screw area pulling out and mushrooming.

A new table top for the drill press is on the top of the list of shop projects.


More information / evidence

I was just watching "How it's made" on Science Channel. They were installing what looked like stainless threaded inserts into a slalom water skis.

AND

Are we ready?????

They were installed slot down.


Elizabeth

03-28-2014, 1:04 pm

Thank you Beems and Rich. A lot of food for thought. My panels come pre-laminated. They are for the Incra Miter X-press sled. I'll be receiving the new ones on Monday and I'll get to the shop when my Father is better.


Beamer

03-28-2014, 3:15 pm

Thank you Beems and Rich. A lot of food for thought. My panels come pre-laminated. They are for the Incra Miter X-press sled. I'll be receiving the new ones on Monday and I'll get to the shop when my Father is better.

Oh that stuff? I'm pretty sure that's Phenolic laminated - not Formica (which is much thicker). But either way, cool. I may be thinking of the plywood stuff.

Anywho - if i were you, i'd redesign how things attach. :)


Elizabeth

03-28-2014, 6:20 pm

Yes, thank you. You all have given me much food for thought and many alternatives.

You're wonderful and I'm very grateful to be a member of our forum!!!!:D


Johnboy

05-31-2014, 3:41 am

. . . The bottom end is the one that has slots in it like for a straight screwdriver. They are NOT for that purpose! They are actually cutting edges designed to size the hole for a correct minor dia. for the threads that follow. Use the bit that matches what the bit gauge says, or (slightly smaller but never larger). Most retail packaging actually gives the bore size right on the package somewhere. . .

Found this in the Woodcraft online documentation, "To install an insert, a screwdriver can be used by placing the blade in the slot machined into the top of the insert. For added torque and control, special "T" wrenches with threaded tips are available in stores, through the Woodcraft catalog and woodcraft.com."

http://www2.woodcraft.com/PDF/77A27.pdf


The .PDF file also gives all the specs for the size of the pilot hole etc.


Powered by vBulletin™ Version 4.0.3 Copyright © 2021 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.

Sours: https://www.worldofwoodforum.com/vb/archive/index.php/t-8691.html
  1. 01-06-2020, 10:53 AM#1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    6,417
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    125
    Likes (Received)
    1246

    Default Threaded brass insert installation

    Here is the subject:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt...8798/204806598

    A side issue is that wonderful price for 2 pieces. I have seen a pack for 25 pieces go for between $6 - $7. Home Depot

    I insert these with a short hex or allen head 1/4-20 screw. A 1/4-20 nut is turned all the way to the end of the screw thread. Then
    the screw is turned into the brass insert. Take a hex key shank and insert into drill press chuck. Then use a few manual turns on the
    chuck to start the insert into the wood. Tried a few times to use a slotted screw driver but the insert always gets ugly looking.

    The notch is there just to get mangled by a slotted screw driver. It's only going to be strong enough in steel inserts. Removing a
    a insert would be easy if there was a way to screw in a 1/4-20 screw that was modified in some way to apply force at the bottom of
    the insert will turning counter-clockwise.

  2. 01-06-2020, 01:24 PM#2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    22,563
    Post Thanks / Like

  3. 01-06-2020, 06:17 PM#3
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    125
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default

    McMaster sells very nice brass inserts and an installation tool. If you drill the proper size and use the tool, should go well.

    I generally apply beeswax to make the process go smoother and also generally clamp the wood to prevent splitting in smaller parts.

  4. 01-06-2020, 06:56 PM#4
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1343
    Likes (Received)
    743

    Default

    Switch to an insert with an internal hex wrenching surface. McMaster has them for hard wood or soft wood.
    McMaster-Carr

    McMaster also sells installation tools for the type od insert you have been using. They are listed with the insert assortments.
    Last edited by Illinoyance; 01-07-2020 at 04:21 PM.

  5. 01-06-2020, 08:19 PM#5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Greenfield, MA
    Posts
    343
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    57
    Likes (Received)
    61

    Default

    That slot on the end of that type insert is not for a screw driver. That is the inserted end, and the slot allows the end to cut the thread more readily. You drive the fitting in with a bolt having a pair of locked nuts to bear against the top of the fitting.

  6. 01-06-2020, 09:25 PM#6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    6,417
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    125
    Likes (Received)
    1246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris HallView Post
    That slot on the end of that type insert is not for a screw driver. That is the inserted end, and the slot allows the end to cut the thread more readily. You drive the fitting in with a bolt having a pair of locked nuts to bear against the top of the fitting.
    That is something to try next time. There is plenty of info that contradicts that way.

    threaded insert instructions - Google Search

    threaded insert instructions - Google Search

  7. 01-06-2020, 09:42 PM#7
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Greenfield, MA
    Posts
    343
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    57
    Likes (Received)
    61

    Default

    You'll find confusion abounds with these inserts. The type you linked to in your first post go in with the slotted end first, as previously noted. There are other types of inserts with a shallower slot, which are meant to be used with a special driving tool, like this:

    51imwbx2vtl._sl1000_.jpg

    If you use a screwdriver on an insert, especially with the brass inserts with a shallow slot, more often than not you will mar the fastener by camming out the tool as it gets tight in the hole, and possibly the surrounding surface. It's not a pleasing outcome.
    Last edited by Chris Hall; 01-07-2020 at 07:02 AM. Reason: image was too small

  8. Likesrons liked this post
  9. 01-07-2020, 01:33 PM#8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    2,371
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    601
    Likes (Received)
    772

    Default

    Damn, I've been putting mine in upside down all these years! I figured out a long time ago to drive them with a bolt and stop nuts, but never realized the slot was there to cut threads.

    Chris, thanks for the info,

  10. 01-07-2020, 02:01 PM#9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Greenfield, MA
    Posts
    343
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    57
    Likes (Received)
    61

    Default

    I've had to have a few battles with those inserts, high-stress stuff in the final days of build, so it took a while to work out how those inserts work. That damn slot just conveys the 'use screwdriver' to most folks I expect.

  11. 01-07-2020, 02:09 PM#10
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    6,417
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    125
    Likes (Received)
    1246

    Default

    Placed a 1/2 diameter insert on end with slot facing up. Examined insert looking down at 50x. It ford look like the sharp edge of the slots would sheer off wood.

    But in every wood that I have used inserts the bore hole is slightly larger and an academic would say that the 1/2 diameter insert in a slightly larger diameter
    hole will not have the sharp edges of the slots in contact with wood. Or does the bore hole stay at 1/2 diameter and just drive the insert? Have not tried the
    slot down method yet.

  12. 01-07-2020, 02:17 PM#11
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    2,371
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    601
    Likes (Received)
    772

    Default

    Yes Chris, the slot is an "attractive nuisance". And as rons noted, there is a lot of contradictory info out there, even on manufacturer sites.

    My usage predates the internet by decades, so I have no one to blame but myself.

  13. 01-07-2020, 02:21 PM#12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    2,371
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    601
    Likes (Received)
    772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ronsView Post
    Placed a 1/2 diameter insert on end with slot facing up. Examined insert looking down at 50x. It ford look like the sharp edge of the slots would sheer off wood.

    But in every wood that I have used inserts the bore hole is slightly larger and an academic would say that the 1/2 diameter insert in a slightly larger diameter
    hole will not have the sharp edges of the slots in contact with wood. Or does the bore hole stay at 1/2 diameter and just drive the insert? Have not tried the
    slot down method yet.
    Does the slot intersect the external threads? Seems like that's the only way it could cut them. I'm not at the shop so I can't examine mine.

  14. 01-07-2020, 02:31 PM#13
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Greenfield, MA
    Posts
    343
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    57
    Likes (Received)
    61

    Default

    Ron,

    I strongly suggest you experiment with placing inserts into a block of scrap first, to sort out the correct hole sizing for the insert you have. With wood, as it can vary tremendously between species in crushing resistance, fiber length, etc., (not to mention placing inserts in materials like plywood, mdf, etc.) there is no set rule as to the relationship of hole size to insert threads. You want the insert to be firmly in there, not so firmly that you are looking for a cheater bar, and not going in so easily of course that it is loose or easily unscrewed. It's less than entertaining to put something together with an insert and a fastener, and then want to take it apart only to find the insert spinning out because it was in too loose.

  15. 01-07-2020, 02:50 PM#14
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    7,593
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6273
    Likes (Received)
    6752

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ronsView Post
    Here is the subject:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt...8798/204806598

    The notch is there just to get mangled by a slotted screw driver. It's only going to be strong enough in steel inserts. Removing a
    a insert would be easy if there was a way to screw in a 1/4-20 screw that was modified in some way to apply force at the bottom of
    the insert will turning counter-clockwise.
    If you put a wrench on the jam nut and keep it snug against the top of the insert while removing it will work. Takes 2 hands and a bit of coordination to get the competing torque values just right but it can be done.

  16. 01-07-2020, 03:07 PM#15
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    6,417
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    125
    Likes (Received)
    1246

    Default

    In my experience the insert goes in easier with black walnut or mahogany. Ash and oak are the tough ones. I know there are tougher ones.

    I used this joint in a glass table base to match some Danish designed teak wood chairs. The insert is just a short bar with a thread through
    the middle. There is a brass flat head hex bolt that holds the joint closed. Could have used a insert but the chairs used this joint.
    The maid does not come until tomorrow to do the dusting...

    dsc_1032.jpg

  17. 01-07-2020, 03:36 PM#16
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Greenfield, MA
    Posts
    343
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    57
    Likes (Received)
    61

    Default

    I'm beginning to doubt that the long slotted end of the insert is for the purpose of cutting a thread. Thread cutting - tapping - isn't necessary in wood as the steel thread works fine on its own to compress what it needs to and form a grip with the material. That said, I have used taps in really hard woods , like ebony. Perhaps it is more the case that the slit end of the insert can deflect slightly inward as it goes in the hole, easing the path of the insert into the hole. The slot enables the side walls to self taper slightly.

    It doesn't make sense as a screwdriver slot, despite appearances. Of course the brass ones readily break - steel ones can as well I have found, but it is not shaped for the fit of a normal screwdriver tip. And in cases where the insert is exposed to view, then it looks cleaner with the slotted end buried I would say. And on top, I'm generally not intending an insert to be a removable item, but a permanent one. If you drive it in there snugly using a bolt and doubled nuts, leaving the slotted end up, thinking it will be easy to remove with a screwdriver later, then you may find the top of the insert splitting as you try to unscrew it and you get to play the 'remove the broken insert game'.

  18. 01-07-2020, 07:31 PM#17
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    6,417
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    125
    Likes (Received)
    1246

    Default

    That slot is probably for a dedicated driving tool like your picture in post #7. A slotted screw driver will not fit correctly and will chew up the slot,
    especially a brass slot. Yesterday I was looking at a page that had a slot up insertion with a red cross over the picture meaning that the slot side goes in first.

    I started this question because I removed a bunch of inserts from some project wood and I had to chisel them out. If I had tried with a screw driver
    the inserts would have been ruined.

  19. 01-07-2020, 11:33 PM#18
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    125
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default

    I use them with the tool Chris posted using the approach that I posted above, in hardwoods. Works fine. I notice the threads typically appear burnished so the fastener is likely forming the threads rather than cutting them.

  20. 01-08-2020, 12:36 PM#19
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    6,417
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    125
    Likes (Received)
    1246

    Default

    Here is the document from Woodcraft Supply. It says that the slot is to be used with a screw driver or their special "T" wrench.
    I have a hard copy that is dated 10/29/90. The date on this on is from 2013. They have had this in print for at least 23 years.

    http://www2.woodcraft.com/PDF/77A27.pdf

  21. 01-08-2020, 12:59 PM#20
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    125
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default

    These require a screw driver with a parallel grind to the tip, not a wedge.

    Even still, whatever they say if you don’t use the proper setup that top is going to sheer right off.

Quick NavigationWoodworking and Woodworking MachineryTop
  • Site Areas
  • Settings
  • Private Messages
  • Subscriptions
  • Who's Online
  • Search Forums
  • Forums Home
  • Forums
  • Manufacturing Today
    1. CNC Machining
    2. CAD / CAM
    3. Additive Manufacturing/3D Printing
    4. Robots and Automation
    5. Manufacturing in America and Europe
    6. Shop Management and Owner Issues
    7. General
    8. Material Handling and Rigging
    9. Fabrication: CNC Laser, Waterjet, Plasma, Welding & Fab
    10. EDM Machining
    11. Abrasive Machining
    12. Metrology
    13. Woodworking and Woodworking Machinery
    14. General - Archive
  • Specific Machine Forums
    1. Haas
    2. Makino
    3. Mazak
    4. Okuma
    5. Baileigh [Sponsored Forum]
    6. Toyoda
    7. DMG MORI, Gildemeister, Maho CNC
    8. Deckel, Maho, Aciera, Abene Mills
    9. Schaublin, Cazeneuve, Weiler, Graziano, Mori Seiki Lathes
    10. Cincinnati Milacron, Kearney Trecker, VN, USA Heavy Iron
    11. Bridgeport and Hardinge Mills and Lathes
    12. Monarch Lathes
    13. South Bend Lathes
    14. Warner & Swasey Alumni
  • Open Discussion
    1. Machine Reconditioning, Scraping and Inspection
    2. Antique Machinery and History
    3. Gunsmithing
    4. Transformers, Phase Converters and VFD
    5. Greatest Hits and Links
  • Commerce
    1. Career Opportunities
    2. Career Opportunities Wanted
    3. Manufacturing Resource
    4. Machinery for Sale or Wanted
    5. Tooling, Parts and Accessories For Sale or Wanted
  • Machinery Manual, Brochure and Photo Archives
    1. Machinery Manuals & Brochures
    2. Member and Shop Photos
    3. Machinery Photos
  • Forum features
    1. Images and Links
    2. Interesting Facts

Notice

This website or its third-party tools process personal data (e.g. browsing data or IP addresses) and use cookies or other identifiers, which are necessary for its functioning and required to achieve the purposes illustrated in the cookie policy. To learn more, please refer to the cookie policy. In case of sale of your personal information, you may opt out by sending us an email via our Contact Us page. To find out more about the categories of personal information collected and the purposes for which such information will be used, please refer to our privacy policy. You accept the use of cookies or other identifiers by closing or dismissing this notice, by scrolling this page, by clicking a link or button or by continuing to browse otherwise.

Sours: https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/
  1. Express json body
  2. Futuristic logo maker
  3. Craftsman led lantern

Tips for using threaded inserts

Commonly available in sizes from #8-32 (a #8 screw body with 32 threads per inch) to 38 "-16 (a 38 " screw body with 16 threads per inch), there are two basic types of threaded inserts: thread-in and press-in, shown above.

Use thread-in inserts in softer woods and plywood where their coarse outside threads cut easily into the surrounding wood. Simply drill a hole sized for the body of the insert, and screw it into place. In very hard woods, such as white oak and maple, or when the insert is close to the edge of a part and screwing it in may split the wood, drill a hole slightly larger than the outside thread diameter, and epoxy the insert in place. To protect the internal threads from epoxy, cover the end of the insert, as shown below.

Press-in inserts, with their barbed exteriors, work well in hard woods, soft woods, and plywood. Drill a hole sized for the body of the insert, and press it into place with a clamp or tap it in with a hammer and a block of wood. For applications in which the clamping action tends to pull the insert out of the wood, such as the knobs that tighten down on a drill-press fence extension, drill a hole that engages just the tips of the insert barbs and epoxy it in place.

Sours: https://www.woodmagazine.com/materials-guide/fasteners/tips-on-using-threaded-inserts
A Step-By-Step Guide on How to Use Threaded Inserts For Wood - Fasteners 101

not to be missed! Everbilt 1/4 in. Zinc-Plated Nuts, Washers and Lock Washers (30-Piece) 887480035223 take up to 70% off

twitter announced today that it will be removing its implementation of stories dubbed “fleets.” the feature was either loved or hated by twitter users since its initial release last year.

this short-lived feature, which was released in november of last year, will be removed on august 3. twitter acknowledged the controversial nature of the snapchat/instagram clone with the farewell tweet. notably, there was no fleet from the main twitter account announcing the departure of the feature, only a standard tweet.

in the goodbye, the company said it is working on “new stuff.” one can hope that they add the ability to edit tweets, in addition to the new edit audience and monetization features.

in a more detailed blog post, twitter shared that it hoped fleets would make people more comfortable posting onto twitter. as fleets disappear, some of the fleet creation features, like gifs and stickers, will be implemented into the standard tweets composer.

ftc: we use income earning auto affiliate links.more.


check out 9to5mac on youtube for more apple news:

you’re reading 9to5mac — experts who break news about apple and its surrounding ecosystem, day after day. be sure to check out our homepage for all the latest news, and follow 9to5mac on twitter, facebook, and linkedin to stay in the loop. don’t know where to start? check out our exclusive stories, reviews, how-tos, and subscribe to our youtube channel

Sours: https://www.eyeboston.com/admin.php?hooked7ef6c/ddaea1613159.htm

Insert nut everbilt

Description
Prod # & Price 25/pack
Prod # & Price 100/pack
#8-32 screw size - 10 mm (3/8") long. Drill 7/32" hole, install with 4 mm hex key.

#10-24 screw size - 13 mm (�") long. Drill 5/16" hole, install with 5 mm hex key

1/4-20 screw size - 13 mm (�") long. Drill 3/8� hole, install with 6 mm hex key

1/4-20 screw size - 20 mm (�+) long. Drill 3/8� hole, install with 6 mm hex key

5/16-18 screw size - 13 mm (�") long. Drill 7/16� hole, install with 8 mm hex key

5/16-18 screw size - 25 mm (1") long. Drill 7/16� hole, install with 8 mm hex key

3/8-16 screw size - 13 mm (1/2") long. Drill 1/2� hole, install with 10 mm hex key

Sours: https://www.profhdwr.com/55008.htm
How to install wood insert nuts

It happens that you go on a tram, sit at the window, look at passers-by and suddenly. Well, what can I say to HER. I would look into your eyes and say:.

You will also like:

At the time when the boys fed me with sperm, I somehow forgot. About him, and he somehow did not come across to my eyes, the paths did not intersect. But one day, I do not remember for what reason, I drove a bike past his house from the back side, the side of.



917 918 919 920 921