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SAN FRANCISCO — More than two years after suffering a concussion from a headfirst collision into an outfield wall while chasing down a fly ball, former San Francisco Giants outfielder Mac Williamson filed suit Tuesday against the franchise alleging negligence and asking for unspecified compensation for damages.

“My life hasn’t been the same since suffering the injury,” said Williamson, 30, in a statement issued by his lawyer.

The 12-page complaint was filed in San Francisco County Superior Court against China Basin Ballpark Company LLC, the owner and operator of Oracle Park that is controlled by the Giants’ ownership group.

The suit alleges the company designed a ballpark with an on-field bullpen that created a hazardous condition that led to Williamson’s injury. The complaint also says the team owners were warned that such bullpens are a safety hazard.

The company breached its duty to protect the players by “failing to eliminate the hazard, despite knowing of numerous instances of players falling over the on-field bullpen mounds in the years before Plaintiff’s injuries,” according to the suit.

In a statement provided to the Bay Area News Group, the San Francisco Giants said, “MLB and its clubs have a long-standing practice of addressing claims from player injuries through the collectively-bargained grievance process and workers’ compensation system. Williamson’s claims are properly resolved through the grievance or workers’ compensation process, not through the courts.”

The dispute is the result of Williamson’s injury on April 24, 2018, in a game against the Washington Nationals. According to the suit, the promising outfielder tumbled over the home bullpen mounds and crashed into a sidewall at Oracle Park while chasing a fly ball in the fifth inning heading down the left-field foul line.

Williamson “immediately clutched his head with both hands and laid on the ground stunned, dazed, and confused,” the complaint says. “The impact was so strong that fans seated in the area and the hitter all grimaced in horror.”

Williamson, who lives in North Carolina, said Tuesday in the statement that the collision “ended my career and left me with life-long injuries that have also taken a significant toll on my personal life.

“I’m fortunate to have such an understanding fiancé who has been there every step of the way and helps me get through the days I suffer nausea, trouble sleeping, mood swings, and other issues. I wake up every day hoping that today is a better day and that I will get closer to how I felt before the injury.”

Williamson suffers from post-concussion syndrome symptoms, the suit says.

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The Giants’ late owner, Peter Magowan, apologized to Williamson after the incident, the suit says. Also, Magowan told Williamson the mounds were located on the field against the wishes of former MLB Commissioner Bud Selig, according to a news release about the suit.

Williamson missed a month of games after the injury, struggled upon returning to the field and ended the 2018 season on the injured list. The outfielder was designated for assignment in March 2019 but earned the chance to rejoin the big league club with a dominant showing at Triple-A Sacramento.

Upon receiving another promotion to the majors from the Giants in May 2019, Williamson called on the Giants to move the bullpen mounds off the field of play and prioritize player safety.

“What’s it going to take?” Williamson asked at the time. “Is it going to take somebody to seriously, seriously get hurt? Break a neck or something? For me, there’s room. Somewhere. If you take out some seats. Yeah, it sucks. You’ve got less capacity for fans, but you’ve got safety for players. You can’t say you don’t have room, in my opinion. There might not be an ideal spot for it. But at the end of the day, if it’s important enough to you, you’ll find it.”

Under the direction of president of baseball operations Farhan Zaidi, the Giants relocated the bullpen mounds beyond the center field fence at Oracle Park before the start of the 2020 season. Williamson and his attorney say they should have never been on the field at all.

“Since the collision, Williamson has fought through the everyday obstacles that accompany the long-term effects of concussions,” San Francisco lawyer R. Scott Erlewine said of his client. “He also championed the relocation of the bullpens to protect other players. His injury should never have happened, and we believe that” China Basin Ballpark Company’s “decision to use on-field bullpens and its failure later to move them, put his and other players’ careers in jeopardy.”

Williamson hit .156 with a .508 OPS in 40 games for the Giants in 2019 and spent the second half of the season with the Samsung Lions of the Korean Baseball Organization. He did not play in 2020 and is currently an unsigned free agent.

At the time Williamson suffered the concussion, Oracle Park was one of three major league facilities with bullpens located in foul territory. The Oakland A’s and the Tampa Bay Rays still have bullpens on the field.

Sours: https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/11/10/former-giants-outfielder-mac-williamson-sues-team-over-career-ending-concussion

Mac Williamson

American baseball player

Mac Williamson
Mac Williamson (48035075551) (cropped).jpg

Williamson with the Seattle Mariners in 2019

Left Fielder
Born: (1990-07-15) July 15, 1990 (age 31)
Jacksonville, Florida

Batted: Right

Threw: Right

MLB: September 23, 2015, for the San Francisco Giants
KBO: July 27, 2019, for the Samsung Lions
MLB: July 14, 2019, for the Seattle Mariners
KBO: 2019, for the Samsung Lions
Batting average.203
Home runs17
Runs batted in50
Batting average.273
Home runs4
Runs batted in15

Johnathan Mackensey Williamson (born July 15, 1990) is an American former professional baseballoutfielder. He played in the Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Francisco Giants and Seattle Mariners, and in the KBO League for the Samsung Lions. Williamson played college baseball at Wake Forest University.

Career[edit]

Williamson attended Wake Forest-Rolesville High School in Wake Forest, North Carolina. He played for the school's baseball team as a pitcher, and was rated the best pitching prospect in the state of North Carolina.[1] He chose to enroll at Wake Forest University to play college baseball for the Wake Forest Demon Deacons. He redshirted as a freshman, and played for Wake Forest as an outfielder.[2] The Boston Red Sox chose Williamson in the 46th round of the 2011 MLB Draft, but he decided to return to Wake Forest for his senior year.[1]

San Francisco Giants[edit]

In the 2012 MLB draft, the San Francisco Giants selected Williamson in the third round, with the 115th overall selection.[3] He signed with the Giants, beginning his professional career in the Rookie-levelArizona League, hitting two home runs in 19 plate appearances. The Giants then promoted Williamson to the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes of the Class A-Short SeasonNorthwest League, where he hit seven home runs in 125 plate appearances.[1]

In 2013, the Giants assigned Williamson to the San Jose Giants of the Class A-AdvancedCalifornia League.[4] He hit 25 home runs for San Jose.

In 2014, he was invited to his first spring training.[5] Though the Giants wanted to assign Williamson to the Richmond Flying Squirrels of the Class AAEastern League to start the 2014 season, an elbow injury led them to keep him in San Jose, where he could still play as a designated hitter. After beginning the season with a .318 batting average and three home runs, Williamson went on the disabled list with a torn ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow and had Tommy John surgery, ending his 2014 season.[6] Williamson would go on to fully recover from the surgery without complication.

In 2015, he began the season with Richmond[7] and the Giants promoted him to the Sacramento River Cats of the Class AAAPacific Coast League in June.[8] The Giants promoted Williamson to MLB on September 16, 2015.[9] He made his MLB debut with the Giants on September 23. He made his first MLB start in right field on September 25, 2015, and got his first MLB hit off Sonny Gray of the Oakland Athletics.[10]

In 2016, Williamson began the season with Sacramento,[11] and received a promotion to the major leagues on April 15,[12] but was sent back to the minors a week later. On June 2, Williamson was called up after Hunter Pence suffered an injury.[13] On June 8, 2016, Williamson hit his first major league home run off David Price of the Boston Red Sox, a tie-breaking shot in the bottom of the eighth inning.[14]

During 2017 spring training, Williamson was in competition for the left field job, competing against other outfielders. He suffered a minor injury towards the end of spring training, which would cause him to miss opening day. Williamson was ping-ponged back and forth between the MLB and triple-A throughout the 2017 season and began to make large contributions to the team near the season's end, including a 3 for 3 performance with a monstrous home run against Clayton Kershaw on September 24, 2017.[15]

Williamson with the Giants during spring training in 2019

On March 28, 2019, Williamson was designated for assignment, after failing to make the Opening Day roster. On April 4, 2019, Williamson cleared waivers and was outrighted to Triple-A. On June 1, 2019, Williamson elected to become a free agent after clearing waivers a second time in 2019.

Seattle Mariners[edit]

On June 5, 2019, Williamson signed a minor league contract with the Seattle Mariners. The Mariners immediately selected his contract after the signing. In his first plate appearance with the Mariners, Williamson hit a 3-run home run. On July 16, he was designated for assignment and later outrighted to Triple-A. Williamson left the team on July 23, 2019, in order to pursue an opportunity in Korea.[16]

Samsung Lions[edit]

On July 25, 2019, Williamson officially signed a $275,000 deal with the Samsung Lions of the KBO League.[17] He became a free agent following the season.

Washington Nationals[edit]

On January 15, 2020, Williamson signed a minor league deal with the Washington Nationals.[18] He was released on May 29, 2020.[19]

Personal life[edit]

Williamson was born in Jacksonville, Florida, on July 15, 1990. He grew up in Wake Forest, North Carolina, with his three brothers, Renn, Cameron, and Christian.

In November 2020, Williamson filed a personal injury lawsuit against China Basin Ballpark Company LLC, which owns and operates Oracle Park, after tripping in the ballpark's on-field bullpen, hitting his head against a wall and suffering a concussion while trying to catch a fly ball in April 2018. Williamson claimed that he was still suffering from symptoms including nausea and dizziness which effectively ended his career.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcPleskoff, Bernie (July 13, 2013). "Prospect Mac Williamson could be power source for Giants". MLB.com. Retrieved January 14, 2014.
  2. ^"Mac Williamson Bio". Wake Forest Demon Deacon Athletics. Archived from the original on July 30, 2018. Retrieved January 29, 2016.
  3. ^"Wake's Mac Williamson & Tim Cooney Picked In 3rd Round of MLB Draft". digtriad.com. June 5, 2012. Archived from the original on January 16, 2014. Retrieved January 14, 2014.
  4. ^"Local sports digest: San Jose Giants' Mac Williamson cracks 20-homer plateau – San Jose Mercury News". San Jose Mercury News. March 12, 2013. Retrieved January 14, 2014.
  5. ^"Giants announce non-roster invitees to 2014 Spring Training". MLB.com (Press release). January 13, 2014.
  6. ^Schulman, Henry (April 28, 2014). "UPDATE: Top SF Giants hitting prospect Williamson to have Tommy John surgery". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  7. ^O'Conner, John (April 7, 2015). "Squirrels' Williamson looking for bounce-back year". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  8. ^Schulman, Henry (June 27, 2015). "Giants Splash: Updates on Pagan's injury, Hudson's rotation spot". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved August 24, 2015.
  9. ^Kawahara, Matt (September 16, 2015). "Giants call up Williamson, Brown, put Panik (back) on 60-day DL". Sacramento Bee. Retrieved September 21, 2015.
  10. ^Steward, Carl (September 25, 2015). "Parker, Williamson provide some salve to another demoralizing one-run loss, brink of elimination". San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved January 29, 2016.
  11. ^"River Cats announce 2016 Opening Day roster" (Press release). Sacramento River Cats. April 6, 2016.
  12. ^"Giants notes: Adrianza to DL, Williamson recalled, plus updates on Crawford, Kontos and Law". Monterey County Herald. April 15, 2016.
  13. ^"Hunter Pence put on 15-day DL after Wednesday exit". ESPN.com. Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  14. ^Letourneau, Connor (June 9, 2016). "Mac Williamson's homer helps Giants end 3-game skid". San Francisco Chronicle.
  15. ^"Williamson impressive vs. Dodgers ace". MLB.com. September 24, 2017.
  16. ^Pavlovic, Alex. "Ex-Giants outfielder Mac Williamson agrees to contract in South Korea". NBC Sports Bay Area. Retrieved July 23, 2019.
  17. ^"Samsung Lions sign ex-MLB outfielder Mac Williamson". English.yonhapnews.co.kr. July 25, 2019. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  18. ^Adams, Steve (January 15, 2020). "Nationals, Mac Williamson Agree to Minor League Deal". mlbtraderumors.com. Retrieved January 17, 2020.
  19. ^Cooper, J.J. (June 1, 2020). "135 MiLB Releases We Learned About Today". Baseball America. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  20. ^Rogers, Jesse (November 10, 2020). "Ex-Giant Williamson suing park over concussion". ESPN.com. Retrieved November 11, 2020.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_Williamson
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  • Johnathan Mackensey Williamson
  • Status: Released
  • Born: 7/15/1990 in Jacksonville, FL
  • Draft: 2012, San Francisco Giants, Round: 3, Overall Pick: 115
  • College: Wake Forest
  • MLB Debut: 9/23/2015

2019 Stats

ABAVGHRRBISBOPS
90.36792311.166

2019 Stats

ABAVGHRRBISBOPS
77.1823100.575

MiLB Career Stats

ABAVGHRRBISBOPS
2022.2819736428.850

MLB Career Stats

ABAVGHRRBISBOPS
434.20317504.630
YearABRHHRRBISBAVGOBPOPS
2019 MiLB Stats9023339231.367.4431.166
2019 MLB Stats7710143100.182.276.575
MiLB Career Stats20223565699736428.281.360.850
MLB Career Stats434518817504.203.282.630

More Mac Williamson

Latest Transactions

TeamDateTransaction
May 29, 2020Fresno Grizzlies released OF Mac Williamson.
March 26, 2020OF Mac Williamson assigned to Fresno Grizzlies.
February 12, 2020Washington Nationals signed free agent LF Mac Williamson to a minor league contract and invited him to spring training.
July 17, 2019Seattle Mariners sent LF Mac Williamson outright to Tacoma Rainiers.
July 17, 2019Tacoma Rainiers released LF Mac Williamson.
July 16, 2019Seattle Mariners designated LF Mac Williamson for assignment.
June 4, 2019Seattle Mariners activated LF Mac Williamson.
June 1, 2019LF Mac Williamson elected free agency.
May 25, 2019San Francisco Giants designated LF Mac Williamson for assignment.
May 7, 2019San Francisco Giants selected the contract of RF Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
April 4, 2019San Francisco Giants sent RF Mac Williamson outright to Sacramento River Cats.
March 28, 2019San Francisco Giants designated RF Mac Williamson for assignment.
October 1, 2018San Francisco Giants recalled RF Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
August 11, 2018Sacramento River Cats placed RF Mac Williamson on the 7-day disabled list.
June 23, 2018San Francisco Giants optioned LF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
May 25, 2018Mac Williamson roster status changed by San Francisco Giants.
May 18, 2018San Francisco Giants sent OF Mac Williamson on a rehab assignment to Sacramento River Cats.
May 7, 2018San Francisco Giants placed LF Mac Williamson on the 10-day disabled list. Concussion
April 28, 2018San Francisco Giants placed RF Mac Williamson on the 7-day disabled list. Concussion.
April 20, 2018San Francisco Giants recalled RF Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
March 19, 2018San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
September 3, 2017San Francisco Giants recalled Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
July 10, 2017San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
July 8, 2017San Francisco Giants recalled Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
May 30, 2017San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
May 15, 2017San Francisco Giants recalled Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
April 25, 2017San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
April 25, 2017San Francisco Giants reassigned RF Mac Williamson to the minor leagues.
April 21, 2017San Francisco Giants sent OF Mac Williamson on a rehab assignment to Sacramento River Cats.
April 19, 2017San Francisco Giants sent RF Mac Williamson on a rehab assignment to San Jose Giants.
April 2, 2017San Francisco Giants placed RF Mac Williamson on the 10-day disabled list retroactive to March 30, 2017. Strained left quad.
November 7, 2016San Francisco Giants activated RF Mac Williamson from the 60-day disabled list.
September 27, 2016San Francisco Giants placed RF Mac Williamson on the 60-day disabled list.
September 1, 2016San Francisco Giants activated RF Mac Williamson from the 15-day disabled list.
August 14, 2016San Francisco Giants sent RF Mac Williamson on a rehab assignment to Sacramento River Cats.
August 2, 2016San Francisco Giants placed RF Mac Williamson on the 15-day disabled list retroactive to August 1, 2016. Left shoulder strain.
June 21, 2016San Francisco Giants recalled RF Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
June 14, 2016San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
June 2, 2016San Francisco Giants recalled Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
May 9, 2016San Francisco Giants optioned Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
May 2, 2016San Francisco Giants recalled Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
April 22, 2016San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
April 15, 2016San Francisco Giants recalled RF Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
March 27, 2016San Francisco Giants optioned Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
September 16, 2015San Francisco Giants selected the contract of Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
July 27, 2015Sacramento River Cats placed OF Mac Williamson on the 7-day disabled list retroactive to July 25, 2015.
July 21, 2015Mac Williamson roster status changed by Sacramento River Cats.
July 7, 2015Sacramento River Cats placed OF Mac Williamson on the temporarily inactive list.
June 26, 2015OF Mac Williamson assigned to Sacramento River Cats from Richmond Flying Squirrels.
April 9, 2015DH Mac Williamson assigned to Richmond Flying Squirrels from San Jose Giants.
March 27, 2015RF Mac Williamson assigned to San Francisco Giants Futures.
March 27, 2015RF Mac Williamson assigned to San Francisco Giants Futures.
February 2, 2015San Francisco Giants invited non-roster RF Mac Williamson to spring training.
September 15, 2014San Jose Giants activated DH Mac Williamson from the 7-day disabled list.
April 28, 2014DH Mac Williamson assigned to San Jose Giants from Giants Extended Spring Training.
April 27, 2014RF Mac Williamson assigned to Giants Extended Spring Training from San Jose Giants.
March 8, 2014RF Mac Williamson assigned to San Francisco Giants Futures.
January 13, 2014San Francisco Giants invited non-roster RF Mac Williamson to spring training.
March 31, 2013RF Mac Williamson assigned to San Jose Giants from Salem-Keizer Volcanoes.
March 20, 2013OF Mac Williamson assigned to San Francisco Giants.
July 24, 2012Mac Williamson assigned to Salem-Keizer Volcanoes from AZL Giants.
July 18, 2012Mac Williamson assigned to AZL Giants.
July 17, 2012San Francisco Giants signed RF Mac Williamson.

+ Show More Transactions

Awards

PCL Player of the Week

Week
04/15/2018Sacramento River CatsPCL

AFL All-Prospect Team

Year
2015Scottsdale ScorpionsAFL

MiLB.com Organization All-Star

Year
2013San Francisco GiantsNL
2015San Francisco GiantsNL

CAL Player of the Week

Week
08/26/2013San Jose GiantsCAL
Sours: https://www.milb.com/player/mac-williamson-607776
Mac Williamson's Hot Start

2019 Stats

ABAVGHRRBISBOPS
77.1823100.575

MLB Career Stats

ABAVGHRRBISBOPS
434.20317504.630

Mac Williamson Bio

  • Fullname: Johnathan Mackensey Williamson
  • Born: 7/15/1990 in Jacksonville, FL
  • Draft: 2012, San Francisco Giants, Round: 3, Overall Pick: 115
  • College: Wake Forest
  • Debut: 9/23/2015
YearABRHHRRBISBAVGOBPOPS
2019 Stats7710143100.182.276.575
MLB Career Stats434518817504.203.282.630

News

View More Videos

Awards

CAL Player of the Week

Week TeamLeague
08/26/2013San Jose GiantsCAL

MiLB.com Organization All-Star

Year TeamLeague
2013San Francisco GiantsNL
2015San Francisco GiantsNL

AFL All-Prospect Team

Year TeamLeague
2015Scottsdale ScorpionsAFL

PCL Player of the Week

Week TeamLeague
04/15/2018Sacramento River CatsPCL

Latest Transactions

TeamDateTransaction
May 29, 2020Fresno Grizzlies released OF Mac Williamson.
March 26, 2020OF Mac Williamson assigned to Fresno Grizzlies.
February 12, 2020Washington Nationals signed free agent LF Mac Williamson to a minor league contract and invited him to spring training.
July 17, 2019Tacoma Rainiers released LF Mac Williamson.
July 17, 2019Seattle Mariners sent LF Mac Williamson outright to Tacoma Rainiers.
July 16, 2019Seattle Mariners designated LF Mac Williamson for assignment.
June 4, 2019Seattle Mariners activated LF Mac Williamson.
June 1, 2019LF Mac Williamson elected free agency.
May 25, 2019San Francisco Giants designated LF Mac Williamson for assignment.
May 7, 2019San Francisco Giants selected the contract of RF Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
April 4, 2019San Francisco Giants sent RF Mac Williamson outright to Sacramento River Cats.
March 28, 2019San Francisco Giants designated RF Mac Williamson for assignment.
October 1, 2018San Francisco Giants recalled RF Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
August 11, 2018Sacramento River Cats placed RF Mac Williamson on the 7-day disabled list.
June 23, 2018San Francisco Giants optioned LF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
May 25, 2018Mac Williamson roster status changed by San Francisco Giants.
May 18, 2018San Francisco Giants sent OF Mac Williamson on a rehab assignment to Sacramento River Cats.
May 7, 2018San Francisco Giants placed LF Mac Williamson on the 10-day disabled list. Concussion
April 28, 2018San Francisco Giants placed RF Mac Williamson on the 7-day disabled list. Concussion.
April 20, 2018San Francisco Giants recalled RF Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
March 19, 2018San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
September 3, 2017San Francisco Giants recalled Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
July 10, 2017San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
July 8, 2017San Francisco Giants recalled Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
May 30, 2017San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
May 15, 2017San Francisco Giants recalled Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
April 25, 2017San Francisco Giants reassigned RF Mac Williamson to the minor leagues.
April 25, 2017San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
April 21, 2017San Francisco Giants sent OF Mac Williamson on a rehab assignment to Sacramento River Cats.
April 19, 2017San Francisco Giants sent RF Mac Williamson on a rehab assignment to San Jose Giants.
April 2, 2017San Francisco Giants placed RF Mac Williamson on the 10-day disabled list retroactive to March 30, 2017. Strained left quad.
November 7, 2016San Francisco Giants activated RF Mac Williamson from the 60-day disabled list.
September 27, 2016San Francisco Giants placed RF Mac Williamson on the 60-day disabled list.
September 1, 2016San Francisco Giants activated RF Mac Williamson from the 15-day disabled list.
August 14, 2016San Francisco Giants sent RF Mac Williamson on a rehab assignment to Sacramento River Cats.
August 2, 2016San Francisco Giants placed RF Mac Williamson on the 15-day disabled list retroactive to August 1, 2016. Left shoulder strain.
June 21, 2016San Francisco Giants recalled RF Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
June 14, 2016San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
June 2, 2016San Francisco Giants recalled Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
May 9, 2016San Francisco Giants optioned Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
May 2, 2016San Francisco Giants recalled Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
April 22, 2016San Francisco Giants optioned RF Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
April 15, 2016San Francisco Giants recalled RF Mac Williamson from Sacramento River Cats.
March 27, 2016San Francisco Giants optioned Mac Williamson to Sacramento River Cats.
Sours: https://www.mlb.com/player/mac-williamson-607776

Wife mac williamson

Age, Biography and Wiki

Mac Williamson was born on 15 July, 1990 in Jacksonville, FL, is an American baseball player. Discover Mac Williamson's Biography, Age, Height, Physical Stats, Dating/Affairs, Family and career updates. Learn How rich is He in this year and how He spends money? Also learn how He earned most of networth at the age of 30 years old?

Popular AsN/A
OccupationN/A
Age31 years old
Zodiac SignCancer
Born15 July 1990
Birthday15 July
BirthplaceJacksonville, FL
NationalityFL

We recommend you to check the complete list of Famous People born on 15 July. He is a member of famous Player with the age 31 years old group.

Mac Williamson Height, Weight & Measurements

At 31 years old, Mac Williamson height is 6′ 4″ .

Physical Status
Height6′ 4″
WeightNot Available
Body MeasurementsNot Available
Eye ColorNot Available
Hair ColorNot Available

Dating & Relationship status

He is currently single. He is not dating anyone. We don't have much information about He's past relationship and any previous engaged. According to our Database, He has no children.

Family
ParentsNot Available
WifeNot Available
SiblingNot Available
ChildrenNot Available

Mac Williamson Net Worth

His net worth has been growing significantly in 2020-2021. So, how much is Mac Williamson worth at the age of 31 years old? Mac Williamson’s income source is mostly from being a successful Player. He is from FL. We have estimated Mac Williamson's net worth, money, salary, income, and assets.

Net Worth in 2021$1 Million - $5 Million
Salary in 2020Under Review
Net Worth in 2019Pending
Salary in 2019Under Review
HouseNot Available
CarsNot Available
Source of IncomePlayer

Mac Williamson Social Network

Timeline

On January 15, 2020, Williamson signed a minor league deal with the Washington Nationals.

Williamson was designated for assignment on March 28, 2019, after failing to make the Opening Day roster. On April 4, 2019, Williamson cleared waivers and was outrighted to Triple-A. On June 1, 2019, Williamson elected to become a free agent after clearing waivers a second time in 2019.

On June 5, 2019, Williamson signed a minor league contract with the Seattle Mariners. The Mariners immediately selected his contract after the signing. In his first plate appearance with the Mariners, Williamson hit a 3-run home run. On July 16, he was designated for assignment and later outrighted to Triple-A. Williamson left the team on July 23, 2019, in order to pursue an opportunity in Korea.

On July 25, 2019, Williamson officially signed a $275,000 deal with the Samsung Lions of the KBO League. He became a free agent following the season.

During spring training, Williamson was in competition for the left field job, competing against other outfielders. He suffered a minor injury towards the end of spring training, which would cause him to miss opening day. Williamson was ping-ponged back and forth between the major leagues and triple-A throughout the 2017 season and began to make large contributions to the team near the season's end, including a 3 for 3 performance with a monstrous home run against Clayton Kershaw on September 24, 2017.

Williamson began the 2016 season with Sacramento, and received a promotion to the major leagues on April 15, but was sent back to the minors a week later. On June 2, Williamson was called up after Hunter Pence suffered an injury. On June 8, 2016, Williamson hit his first major league home run off David Price of the Boston Red Sox, a tie-breaking shot in the bottom of the eighth inning.

He began the 2015 season with Richmond and the Giants promoted him to the Sacramento River Cats of the Class AAA Pacific Coast League in June. The Giants promoted Williamson to the major leagues on September 16, 2015. He made his debut with the Giants on September 23. He made his first major league start in right field on September 25, 2015, and got his first major league hit off Sonny Gray of the Oakland Athletics.

He was invited to his first spring training in 2014. Though the Giants wanted to assign Williamson to the Richmond Flying Squirrels of the Class AA Eastern League to start the 2014 season, an elbow injury led them to keep him in San Jose, where he could still play as a designated hitter. After beginning the season with a .318 batting average and three home runs, Williamson went on the disabled list with a torn ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow and had Tommy John surgery, ending his 2014 season. Williamson would go on to fully recover from the surgery without complication.

In 2013, the Giants assigned Williamson to the San Jose Giants of the Class A-Advanced California League. He hit 25 home runs for San Jose.

In the 2012 MLB Draft, the San Francisco Giants selected Williamson in the third round, with the 115th overall selection. He signed with the Giants, beginning his professional career in the Rookie-level Arizona League, hitting two home runs in 19 plate appearances. The Giants then promoted Williamson to the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes of the Class A-Short Season Northwest League, where he hit seven home runs in 125 plate appearances.

Williamson attended Wake Forest-Rolesville High School in Wake Forest, North Carolina. He played for the school's baseball team as a pitcher, and was rated the best pitching prospect in the state of North Carolina. He chose to enroll at Wake Forest University to play college baseball for the Wake Forest Demon Deacons. He redshirted as a freshman, and played for Wake Forest as an outfielder. The Boston Red Sox chose Williamson in the 46th round of the 2011 MLB Draft, but he decided to return to Wake Forest for his senior year.

Johnathan Mackensey Williamson (born July 15, 1990) is an American professional baseball outfielder in the Washington Nationals organization. He played in the Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Francisco Giants and Seattle Mariners, and in the KBO League for the Samsung Lions. Williamson played college baseball at Wake Forest University.

Williamson was born in Jacksonville, Florida on July 15, 1990. He grew up in Wake Forest, North Carolina with his three brothers, Renn, Cameron, and Christian.

Sours: https://www.celebsagewiki.com/mac-williamson
Former SF GIANTS Outfielder Mac Williamson Sues Club Over Concussion That “Ended My Career”

Does Mac Williamson’s suit have a chance? ‘It’s like a law-school exam question’


Stan Szeto-USA TODAY Sports


Mac Williamson is not formally suing the San Francisco Giants because he cannot. Under California law, an employee whose injury arises from his or her employment only can seek workers’ compensation.

So Williamson and his attorneys, Scott Erlewine and Michael Levinson, are not aiming their complaint at the club officially but obliquely, naming the China Basin Ballpark Company as the defendant, suing the owner and operator of Oracle Park — which is controlled by the club’s ownership group.

That will be an early decision a judge will have to make — whether the group is indeed separate from the team — in electing whether to proceed with a case in which Williamson says bullpen mounds located on the field ended his career. The former Giants outfielder tripped over the mounds while chasing down a foul ball on April 24, 2018, hit his head on the nearby wall, and a career that he argues was about to take off stayed grounded.

Williamson said the concussion he sustained has lingered, and through the ensuing demotion to the minor leagues, eventual release by the Giants and failed attempts with other clubs, he experienced “vision problems, bouts of vertigo-like symptoms, motion sickness, and other symptoms as well,” the complaint says.

If the suit is to be successful, the 30-year-old’s team will have to prove 1) he was about to emerge as a bona-fide major leaguer; 2) the concussion kept from achieving that and 3) the operators of the ballpark were negligent in placing the mounds on the playing field and did not act soon enough to prevent serious injury.

If it sounds tricky, well, “It’s like a law-school exam question,” said Jim Sell, a San Francisco managing partner for nationwide insurance/civil litigation defense firm Tyson & Mendes, and, full disclosure, a Giants fan. “Or a bar-exam question — there are a lot of issues here.”

KNBR talked with a pair of lawyers on the phone this week to sort through some of those issues:

Was Williamson about to become a legitimate major leaguer?

Williamson was a solid prospect, but not a can’t-miss one.

In 2015, before his first call-up, he was ranked No. 13 in the Giants’ system by MLB Pipeline, a power bat who made his way through the minors after getting drafted in the third round in 2012.

He struggled at the big-league level through parts of three seasons, leading to his working with outside hitting instructor Doug Latta prior to the ’18 season. He sizzled to begin that minor league year, knocking six home runs in 11 games while batting .487. The Giants called him up for a fourth year hoping this time would be better than the others, and it was: He hit two homers in four games, then blasted a third after banging his head on the wall in game five of his season.

“In April 2018, Plaintiff was one of the best power hitters in Major League Baseball,” the suit reads.

Convincing a jury a fallen prospect had found the right swing and was about to emerge as a major league threat — and thus setting himself up for millions — would be a significant challenge.

“Is that [five-game sample] enough to really show what the full trajectory of his career would have been?” asked Landon Vivian, a personal injury attorney at The Barnes Firm in Oakland (and an A’s fan). “You have to look at the sample size here, and is that going to give you a strong enough case to really present that he would have had this long career if [the concussion] hadn’t happened?”

Baseball fans know plenty of flashes in the pan, which are far more common than longtime major leaguers. Williamson’s side would lean on the expertise of Latta, whose advice on swing changes turned around the careers of stars like Justin Turner. If the case makes it to a jury, Team Oracle Park would cite the fickleness and elusiveness of baseball success.

Did the concussion, and not other factors, prevent Williamson from succeeding?

The lawsuit attempts to strongly answer “yes.”

“The concussion caused a steep decline in Plaintiff’s performance level and effectively ended Plaintiff’s Major League Baseball career,” says the complaint.

The attorneys contended Williamson’s team will call up doctors who point to the long-term effects concussions can have, while the opposing side will say that two and a half years later, perhaps he just was not good enough for a longer big-league career.

Williamson says he has battled vision issues, among other concerns, since the concussion. Team Oracle Park can argue that in 2019, a year removed from the incident, he batted .378 with nine home runs in 23 games with Triple-A Sacramento, again earning a promotion. He then struggled in 15 games at the major league level (hitting .118) before he was designated for assignment. He had a short stint with the Mariners but made no breakthrough.

Was Williamson complaining to players, coaches and people around him about the symptoms through this time? Both sides will try to find evidence.

Is the ballpark at fault?

Oracle Park was one of three ballparks at the time that situated its bullpen mounds on the playing field. The A’s and Rays, the other two (both trying to get new parks), have not dealt with lawsuits or serious injuries.

Though perhaps it is less a factor of the mounds themselves and more an issue of their placement within the park.

“If this happened at the Oakland Coliseum, and if he had tripped over those mounds, we wouldn’t be having this discussion,” Sell said. “What makes this different is how close those bullpen mounds are to the wall at Oracle. … Yes, he assumed the risk of injury by stepping on the field. But his attorneys are going to argue [the owner/operators of Oracle Park] exposed him to an increased risk of harm.”

Williamson’s team is attempting to argue that the ballpark operators knew the dangers of the mounds when they were installed, when they already were on the decline across the league; a release from the attorneys stated then-Giants managing partner Peter Magowan told Williamson that the mounds were placed there against the wishes of then-commissioner Bud Selig over safety concerns upon the park opening in 2000.

Further, the suit claims that six weeks after Williamson’s injury, Magowan apologized and “said he felt responsible for his injuries.”

Williamson’s team will hope there were witnesses to the conversation. Magowan died in January 2019, and if no one overheard the alleged comments, the defense would argue the comments are hearsay.

The bullpen mounds remained on the playing field during the 2019 season, when San Francisco outfielder Steven Duggar tripped over them and hurt his wrist, which is listed in the complaint. As players from other teams had scares as well, the complaint digs up quotes from Bruce Bochy, Mike Krukow, Buster Posey, Brandon Belt and Brandon Crawford, all alluding to the dangers of the mounds.

In between the 2019 and ’20 campaigns, the Giants removed the mounds. While they also wanted to increase offense in the pitcher-friendly confines, the release stated the mounds were being moved beyond the outfield fences to “increase player safety and enhance fan engagement.”

In moving the mounds, were the Giants admitting fault? Like everything else here, it’s tricky.

The law does not want to punish people and businesses for fixing problems. Subsequent remedial measures, as they are known, generally are “inadmissible to prove negligence or culpable conduct in connection with the event,” California law states.

But there are exceptions. If the Giants solely wanted to juice up the park, they probably could have done so without touching the mounds.

“Technically, it is irrelevant, but the jury’s going to hear about it,” Sell said. “Mac’s attorneys will argue it is relevant to show the mounds could have been moved.”

What’s the precedent?

It’s hard to find a direct ancestor, though there are imperfect analogous cases.

Reggie Bush successfully sued the Rams, who were ordered to pay the running back $4.95 million in compensatory damages and $7.5 million in punitive damages after he slipped on a concrete strip just off the playing field that his momentum brought him to, suffering a season-ending MCL injury. The then-St. Louis Rams were found to be negligent in keeping the ring of concrete exposed at what was then called the Edward Jones Dome.

Bush, though, was an NFL star with established credentials who could much easier estimate the monetary figure he lost.

Greg Reynolds, a pitcher who appeared in 33 major league games from 2008-13, was attempting to work his way back to the majors in 2016, when a man on LSD attacked him at his Half Moon Bay home. Reynolds punched him in self defense and claimed his pitching hand was never the same. He eventually was awarded $2.3 million in a civil suit aimed at the attacker and the host of the party from which his attacker came.

Perhaps Reynolds, who had not pitched in the big leagues in three years, is a case to look for monetary precedent. If the case proceeds, Williamson’s team would have a difficult time establishing damages for a player with 160 big-league games played, without much success, in his career.

So what happens next?

Statistically speaking, Vivian said, most suits do not reach a jury, either getting settled or thrown out before that step. But Williamson has a case.

“I don’t think this is the type of case that a judge would dismiss,” Sell said. “I think a judge would have a jury decide it.”

If so, it would not be heard for “at least another two years,” he said, because of the COVID-19 backlog.

Sours: https://www.knbr.com/2020/11/18/does-mac-williamsons-suit-have-a-chance-its-like-a-law-school-exam-question/

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Mac Williamson

Mac Williamson net worth, birthday, age, height, weight, wiki, fact 2020-21! In this article, we will discover how old is Mac Williamson? Who is Mac Williamson dating now & how much money does Mac Williamson have?

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Mac Williamson Biography

Mac Williamson is a famous Baseball Player, who was born on July 15, 1990 in United States. Williamson was born in Jacksonville, Florida on July 15, 1990. He grew up in Wake Forest, North Carolina with his three brothers, Renn, Cameron, and Christian. According to Astrologers, Mac Williamson's zodiac sign is Cancer.

He was invited to his first spring training in 2014. Though the Giants wanted to assign Williamson to the Richmond Flying Squirrels of the Class AA Eastern League to start the 2014 season, an elbow injury led them to keep him in San Jose, where he could still play as a designated hitter. After beginning the season with a .318 batting average and three home runs, Williamson went on the disabled list with a torn ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow and had Tommy John surgery, ending his 2014 season. Williamson would go on to fully recover from the surgery without complication.

In the 2012 MLB Draft, the San Francisco Giants selected Williamson in the third round, with the 115th overall selection. He signed with the Giants, beginning his professional career in the Rookie-level Arizona League, hitting two home runs in 19 plate appearances. The Giants then promoted Williamson to the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes of the Class A-Short Season Northwest League, where he hit seven home runs in 125 plate appearances.

He began the 2015 season with Richmond and the Giants promoted him to the Sacramento River Cats of the Class AAA Pacific Coast League in June. The Giants promoted Williamson to the major leagues on September 16, 2015. He made his debut with the Giants on September 23. He made his first major league start in right field on September 25, 2015, and got his first major league hit off Sonny Gray of the Oakland Athletics.

Ethnicity, religion & political views

Many peoples want to know what is Mac Williamson ethnicity, nationality, Ancestry& Race? Let's check it out! As per public resource, IMDb & Wikipedia, Mac Williamson's ethnicity is Not Known. We will update Mac Williamson's religion & political views in this article. Please check the article again after few days.

Williamson began the 2016 season with Sacramento, and received a promotion to the major leagues on April 15, but was sent back to the minors a week later. On June 2, Williamson was called up after Hunter Pence suffered an injury. On June 8, 2016, Williamson hit his first major league home run off David Price of the Boston Red Sox, a tie-breaking shot in the bottom of the eighth inning.

Mac Williamson Net Worth

Mac Williamson is one of the richest Baseball Player & listed on most popular Baseball Player. According to our analysis, Wikipedia, Forbes & Business Insider, Mac Williamson net worth is approximately $1.5 Million.

Mac Williamson Net Worth & Salary
Net Worth$1.5 Million
SalaryUnder Review
Source of IncomeBaseball Player
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HouseLiving in own house.

Johnathan Mackensey Williamson (born July 15, 1990) is an American professional baseball outfielder in the Washington Nationals organization. He played in the Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Francisco Giants and Seattle Mariners, and in the KBO League for the Samsung Lions. Williamson played college baseball at Wake Forest University.

Williamson began the 2016 season with Sacramento, and received a promotion to the major leagues on April 15, but was sent back to the minors a week later. On June 2, Williamson was called up after Hunter Pence suffered an injury. On June 8, 2016, Williamson hit his first major league home run off David Price of the Boston Red Sox, a tie-breaking shot in the bottom of the eighth inning.

During spring training, Williamson was in competition for the left field job, competing against other outfielders. He suffered a minor injury towards the end of spring training, which would cause him to miss opening day. Williamson was ping-ponged back and forth between the major leagues and triple-A throughout the 2017 season and began to make large contributions to the team near the season’s end, including a 3 for 3 performance with a monstrous home run against Clayton Kershaw on September 24, 2017.

Mac Williamson Height

Mac Williamson's height Not available right now. weight Not Known & body measurements will update soon.

Mac Williamson Height & Body Stats
HeightUnknown
WeightNot Known
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Williamson attended Wake Forest-Rolesville High School in Wake Forest, North Carolina. He played for the school’s baseball team as a pitcher, and was rated the best pitching prospect in the state of North Carolina. He chose to enroll at Wake Forest University to play college baseball for the Wake Forest Demon Deacons. He redshirted as a freshman, and played for Wake Forest as an outfielder. The Boston Red Sox chose Williamson in the 46th round of the 2011 MLB Draft, but he decided to return to Wake Forest for his senior year.

On July 25, 2019, Williamson officially signed a $275,000 deal with the Samsung Lions of the KBO League. He became a free agent following the season.

Who is Mac Williamson dating?

According to our records, Mac Williamson is possibily single & has not been previously engaged. As of June 2021, Mac Williamson’s is not dating anyone.

Relationships Record: We have no records of past relationshipsfor Mac Williamson. You may help us to build the dating records for Mac Williamson!

On January 15, 2020, Williamson signed a minor league deal with the Washington Nationals.

Facts & Trivia

Ranked on the list of most popular Baseball Player. Also ranked in the elit list of famous celebrity born in United States. Mac Williamson celebrates birthday on July 15 of every year.

Williamson was designated for assignment on March 28, 2019, after failing to make the Opening Day roster. On April 4, 2019, Williamson cleared waivers and was outrighted to Triple-A. On June 1, 2019, Williamson elected to become a free agent after clearing waivers a second time in 2019.

You may read full biography about Mac Williamson from Wikipedia.
Sours: https://allfamousbirthday.com/mac-williamson/


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