Lobo hit songs

Lobo hit songs DEFAULT

Los Lobos: ‘La Bamba gave us an identity crisis’

Los Lobos reached pop’s pinnacle in 1987 when their cover of La Bamba, recorded for a film of the same name, reached No 1 around the world. On their way up, and indeed back down the other side, the Los Angeles roots-rockers have mastered multiple musical styles during nearly 50 years together – from traditional Mexican folk to jump blues and avant-rock – and have earned 11 Grammy nominations (with three wins), working or appearing with Paul Simon, the Clash, film-maker Robert Rodriguez and more along the way.

Now, to move forward, Los Lobos decided to look back. Native Sons, their 17th studio album, is a wide-ranging celebration of the LA artists that inspired the band early on. With covers of well-known pop tunes by the Beach Boys (Sail on Sailor) and Buffalo Springfield (For What It’s Worth) sitting alongside rare cuts from 60s garage rockers Thee Midniters and Latin jazz legend Willie Bobo, it’s the perfect polyglot collection for this multi-faceted ensemble. “You wouldn’t run into [these artists] at the same party,” says guitarist Louie Pérez Jr. “But once they all got to the party, everyone in the band thought, ‘Hey, this is kind of fun.’”

It’s brought the band back to their roots as an in-demand wedding band in east LA where the remit is to play the hits. “Normally when somebody does a tribute record, they do their versions of whoever is the object of the tribute,” Pérez says. “We didn’t do that. We try to play it just like it sounded on the original records. It doesn’t make it about us. It makes it a real tribute.”

Trying to perfectly replicate the sounds of the past has been a hallmark for the band. The core members – Pérez, singer-instrumentalist David Hidalgo, guitarist Cesar Rosas and bassist Conrad Lozano – were initially drawn together in the 1970s by their love of psychedelic rock and cut their musical teeth in various LA cover bands. But what bonded them was the traditional Mexican music that was a mainstay in their respective households. “It was kind of like car alarms,” remembers Pérez. “It was in the background and we didn’t even hear it any more. Then we got totally immersed in it.” The group studied the records in their parents’ collections and snapped up instruments such as the guitarrón and requinto jarocho from pawn shops.

Soon, the band was playing all over east Los Angeles, looking, as Pérez puts it, “more like [Neil Young’s] Crazy Horse than a Mexican band,” and making connections with multiple generations of Chicanos. “We’d be at some event in the park and the old people would be rolling up their blankets, ready to leave. Then we’d start playing and all of the sudden, they’d unfurl the blankets. These grandmas would come up and bless us.”

As their sound evolved to once again incorporate electric instruments and rock rhythms, the band found their way to the other side of the LA River and the thriving punk and roots rock scenes of the early 80s. Getting gigs with fellow artists such as the Blasters (from whom they pinched saxophonist Steve Berlin) and Latino punk group the Plugz, Los Lobos wowed and angered audiences. At one notorious gig, they played a set of acoustic Mexican standards when opening for post-punks Public Image Limited. The crowd responded with spit, jeering and projectiles. “The pennies and the dimes started coming in, and then the quarters started coming in,” Rosas told author Chris Morris in the biography Los Lobos: Dream in Blue. “I remember they threw this big wad of wet paper, and it hit Dave in the face.”

Things got better. The band’s reputation for thrilling live shows grew, and they won their first Grammy for Anselma, a rousing tejano number taken from their 1983 EP ...And a Time to Dance. Their breakthrough came in 1987 when they were asked to record a handful of Ritchie Valens songs for a biopic about the late rocker. “The request came directly from Ritchie’s family,” says Pérez. “La Bamba was the single in the stack of 45s that everybody carried around when we were growing up – sure, let’s pay tribute to him.”

Exciting as it was, the band’s expectations were low. “I remember seeing the film and thinking, ‘That’s actually a decent movie. Shame that no one’s going to see it,’” says Berlin. La Bamba wound up being a huge box office hit and Los Lobos’ version of the song shot to the top of the US and UK charts.

While they relished the financial windfall and opportunities that came along with the success, the band, says Pérez, faced “a little bit of an identity crisis. We had been doing this a long time and that song eclipsed everything we’d done before.” Rather than chase down another hit like it, Los Lobos followed up with La Pistola y El Corazón, an album that returned to their traditional Mexican music roots. “We played it for [Warner Bros Records president] Lenny Waronker and he had a kind of glazed look in his eyes,” says Pérez. “He said, ‘This means a lot to you? OK … We’ll make a record. Let me take care of the rest.’ Which meant that he had to get up and explain to Mo Ostin, the CEO, that we were gonna commit commercial suicide.” That album went on to win another Grammy for the band.

Los Lobos’ insistence on following their own instincts and interests only grew stronger. In the 90s, they collaborated with producer Mitchell Froom on Kiko and Colossal Head, a pair of daring albums that brought in touches of funk, noise rock and experimental music. “We decided we’re going to make uncompromising music that makes us happy,” says Berlin. “And if nobody likes it, we don’t care. We’re gonna do it anyway. The attitude going in was, ‘Fuck everybody.’ Sometimes that’s the way you’ve got to be to get some good stuff out of yourself.”

The band have settled into a comfortable groove of tours and recording sessions without becoming complacent – they recorded a children’s album with musician and labour activist Lalo Guerrero, and backed up actor Antonio Banderas on a song for the film Desperado – while keeping the same lineup. “The secret is that we were friends before we were a band,” says Pérez. “We didn’t meet each other through the classified ads. I think we’re all still really good friends and brothers.”

That feeling was apparent during the sessions for Native Sons when Hidalgo decided to surprise Pérez by laying down a version of Jamaica Say You Will, a song from Jackson Browne’s debut album. “I said, ‘Wow! Whose idea was that?’ David was looking at his shoes and said, ‘Well, I know this record meant a lot to you.’ And then he said, ‘And you’re gonna sing it.’ They managed to get one verse out of me.”

An extended break during the pandemic – “for us to regroup and refresh and put ourselves back together again”, Pérez says – will hopefully serve Los Lobos well ahead of an autumn tour and then celebrations of their half-century. “We’re all lucky and thankful,” says Berlin. “It didn’t look like it was going to last this long when we started, that’s for sure.”

Sours: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2021/aug/03/los-lobos-la-bamba-gave-us-an-identity-crisis

Biography

Singer/songwriter Lobo was born as Roland Kent LaVoie on July 31, 1943 in Tallahassee, Florida. One of seven children, Lobo was raised by his mother in Winter Haven, Florida. His father was a big band guitar player. Lobo joined the band the Rumors in 1961. He attended both St. Petersburg Junior College and the University of South Florida. In 1964 he joined the group the Suger Beats. Other bands Lobo was a member of in his salad days were US Male and Me and the Other Guys. In 1969 Lobo recorded "Happy Days in New York City/My Friend is Here," which was his debut single as a solo artist on the Laurie Records label. Lobo had his first hit song in 1971 with the charming "Me and You and a Dog Named Boo," which peaked at #5 on the Billboard pop charts. The plaintive ballad "I'd Love You to Want Me" proved to be Lobo's greatest smash success; it soared all the way to #2 on the Billboard pop charts in 1972. Moreover, "I'd Love You to Want Me" was a #1 hit in Germany in 1973 and cracked the UK pop charts at #5 in the middle of 1974. "Don't Expect Me to Be Your Friend" likewise did well; it reached #8 on the Billboard pop charts in 1972. Lobo had additional Top 40 hits in 1973 and 1974 with the songs "It Sure Took a Long, Long Time," "How Can I Tell Her," and "Standing at the End of the Line." Lobo had his last Top 30 chart success with "Don't Tell Me Goodnight" in 1975. He went on to record either albums and/or singles for the labels Philips, Curb Records, and MCA Records throughout the rest of the 70's. In 1979 Lobo had a #23 hit with "Where Were You When I Was Falling in Love." He started his own label called Lobo Records in 1981. Lobo had a trio of country radio hits in the early 80's with the songs "I Don't Want to Want You," "Come Looking for Me," and "Living My Life Without You". Lobo Records became Evergreen Records in 1985. The label scored a big country hit with the single "Paint the Town Blue," which was a duet between Lobo and Robin Lee. In the late 80's Lobo started to amass a substantial fan following in Asia. He has released several albums for the Asian market and has performed in concert to sold-out crowds in Asia. Lobo released his latest album "Out of Time" in 2008.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: woodyanders

Family (1)

Spouse Susie (? - present)

Personal Quotes (2)

I'm heard in elevators and malls everyday, alongside Bread and the Carpenters. People don't know me much or the way I look and that's OK. To this day, most probably think I'm some group.
Fifteen million singles have my name on them -- three million albums. I'd like to say the records sold because they were great and I was a great singer, but in all honesty I was merely good as a pop writer, only acceptable as a singer. Whatever makes a commercial singer, I had it. And it was never that I sounded so good. As far as I can figure, it had something to do with believability and simplicity. I mean, here was this guy singing what other people were thinking. It was simple stuff: no hidden meanings, no fancy workups, no musical advancements. Then again, possibly there was something there that was bigger than I've given credit to. I can't put my finger on it.
Sours: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm2499367/bio
  1. Rollup images
  2. Infinity cheer jacksonville
  3. Crystal background hd

Hit Song Of Lobo



Lobo - Lobo Greatest Hits Playlist - Best Songs Of Lobo ...

Mon, 04 Oct 2021 09:55:00 GMT

Lobo - Lobo Greatest Hits Playlist - Best Songs Of LoboLobo - Lobo Greatest Hits Playlist - Best Songs Of LoboThanks for watching. If you like video please "...

Lobo | The Very Best Songs Of Lobo | Lobo's Greatest Hits ...

Sun, 10 Oct 2021 10:02:00 GMT

Lobo | The Very Best Songs Of Lobo | Lobo's Greatest Hits Full AlbumLobo | The Very Best Songs Of Lobo | Lobo's Greatest Hits Full AlbumThanks for watching. ...

Greatest Hits — Lobo | Last.fm

Mon, 11 Oct 2021 06:05:00 GMT

Lobo (born Roland Kent Lavoie, July 31, 1943), is an American singer-songwriter who was successful in the early 1970s, scoring several Top 10 hits, including "Me and You and a Dog Named Boo," "I'd Love You to Want Me" and "Don't Expect Me To Be Your Friend." Lobo's songs have been characterized by their sweet melodies, sumptuous instrumentation and soulful lyrics.

Lobo Greatest Hits- Best Songs Of Lobo -Soft Rock Love ...

Mon, 11 Oct 2021 02:23:00 GMT

Lobo Greatest Hits- Best Songs Of Lobo -Soft Rock Love Songs 70s, 80s, 90s Lobo Greatest Hits- Best Songs Of Lobo -Soft Rock Love Songs 70s, 80s, 90s Lobo Gr...

Top Lobo Songs | Highest Chart Hits

Wed, 22 Sep 2021 11:21:00 GMT

2 Song Chart Appearances. Lobo was around 28 years old when his first singled charted. Lobo first charted in 1971. His last appearance in the charts was 1973. He had chart topping singles covering a span of 3 years. See if Lobo made the list of most famous people with first name Lobo.

List of all songs by Lobo (A-Z) | Songstube

Sun, 10 Oct 2021 13:09:00 GMT

Alphabetical list of all songs by Lobo. SongsTube provides all the best Lobo songs, oldies but goldies tunes and legendary hits.

Lobo ~ Songs List | OLDIES.com

Sat, 09 Oct 2021 18:10:00 GMT

Complete song listing of Lobo on OLDIES.com. To place an order or for customer service, call toll-free 1-800-336-4627 or outside the United States, call 1-610-649-7565

Top Lobo Songs | Highest Chart Hits

Wed, 22 Sep 2021 11:21:00 GMT

2 Song Chart Appearances. Lobo was around 28 years old when his first singled charted. Lobo first charted in 1971. His last appearance in the charts was 1973. He had chart topping singles covering a span of 3 years. See if Lobo made the list of most famous people with first name Lobo.

Stream Best Songs Of Lobo - Lobo Greatest Hits Full Album ...

Thu, 15 Jul 2021 20:00:00 GMT

Comment by chonlukun. nice love song. 2021-02-14T07:58:52Z Comment by M Andi Subahar. best. 2020-08-31T05:48:23Z. Users who like Best Songs Of Lobo - Lobo Greatest Hits Full Album

The Best Of Lobo — Lobo | Last.fm

Thu, 30 Sep 2021 06:54:00 GMT

Lobo (born Roland Kent Lavoie, July 31, 1943), is an American singer-songwriter who was successful in the early 1970s, scoring several Top 10 hits, including "Me and You and a Dog Named Boo," "I'd Love You to Want Me" and "Don't Expect Me To Be Your Friend." Lobo's songs have been characterized by their sweet melodies, sumptuous instrumentation and soulful lyrics.

The Best of Lobo - Lobo | Songs, Reviews, Credits | AllMusic

Fri, 01 Oct 2021 10:56:00 GMT

Find album reviews, songs, credits and award information for The Best of Lobo by Lobo on AllMusic - 2004 - Anyone who has ever loved "Me and You and a Dog ...

The Best Of Lobo Songs Download: The Best Of Lobo MP3 ...

Wed, 06 Oct 2021 16:19:00 GMT

About The Best Of Lobo Album. The Best Of Lobo is a English album released on 01 Aug 2012. This album is composed by Kent "Lobo" LaVoie. The Best Of Lobo Album has 18 songs sung by Lobo. Listen to all songs in high quality & download The Best Of Lobo songs on Gaana.com.

Top Los Lobos Songs | Highest Chart Hit

Thu, 23 Sep 2021 01:33:00 GMT

1 Song Chart Appearance. Los Lobos first charted 14 years after their formation or first release. Los Lobos first charted in 1987. Their last appearance in the charts was 1987. They had chart topping singles covering a span of 1 year.

How Can I Tell Her Lobo Greatest Hits Full Album Best ...

Mon, 11 Oct 2021 13:07:00 GMT

Lobo his very best. 2008 rerecorded version. 70s mellow hits album. 2000 the best of two decades. the 60's, vol. tag: lobo, lobo greatest hits, lobo greatest hits full album, the best of lobo, best of lobo, best songs of lobo. super oldies of the 50's greatest hits of the jigsaw puzzles for free home. the best of lobo, 1993.

List of songs by Los Lobos

Sun, 10 Oct 2021 22:20:00 GMT

Los Lobos Song list. Angels With Dirty Faces (1992) Don't Worry Baby (1984) Evangeline (1984) Kiko and the Lavender Moon (1992) La Bamba (1987) Made to Break Your Heart (2015) One Time, One Night (1987)

Lobo (musician) - Wikipedia

Mon, 11 Oct 2021 00:57:00 GMT

His follow-up album Classic Hits in 1995 were re-recordings of Lobo hits and some cover versions. In 1996 he released the album Sometimes , containing all new original songs. On another Asian label, Springroll Entertainment, he released You Must Remember This in 1997, an album of pop standards that was released in two formats, one with vocals and the other with instrumental tracks.

Top 10 Songs of May – Eye of the Lobo

Fri, 10 Sep 2021 14:56:00 GMT

Arizona-Hey Lobos It’s Daniel Suarez and I’m going to be going over the top 10 songs on Billboard’s Hot 100 as of May 15th, 2021.1- “Save Your Tears” By The Weeknd “Save Your Tears” By The Weeknd and Ariana Grande. 2- “Leave The Door Open” By Bruno Mars & Anderson .Paak 3- “Peaches” By Justin Bieber 4- “Levitating” By Dua Lipa Ft. DaBaby

Syarat dan Ketentuan / Kebijakan Privasi
© Nomor Siapa? - 2021
Database nomor indonesia

Sours: https://nomorsiapa.com/new?id=hit-song-of-lobo
Lobo - Lobo Greatest Hits Playlist - Best Songs Of Lobo

Lobo (born Roland Kent Lavoie, July 31, 1943), is an American singer-songwriter who was successful in the early 1970s, scoring several Top 10 hits, including "Me and You and a Dog Named Boo," "I'd Love You to Want Me" and "Don't Expect Me To Be Your Friend." Lobo's songs have been characterized by their sweet melodies, sumptuous instrumentation and soulful lyrics. This has made him well known outside the Western world, including Africa, India and Southeast Asia.

Born in Tallahassee, Florida, Lavoie was raised by his mother in Winter Haven, Florida with his six siblings. He began his musical career in 1961 as a member of a local band, The Rumours. The band included Gram Parsons and Jim Stafford, as well as drummer Jon Corneal, who later joined Parsons' International Submarine Band.

In 1964, while attending the University of South Florida, Lavoie joined a band called the Sugar Beats and met producer Phil Gernhard. He recorded a regional hit for the band, a cover of Johnny Rivers' song, "What Am I Doing Here".

During the 1960s, Lavoie performed with many other bands, including US Male, The Uglies, and Me and the Other Guys. It was in the latter band that he met musician Billy Aerts, who became a member of Lobo's touring band in the early 1970s and produced Lobo's comeback album in 1989.

Again working with Gernhard, his first solo record was released in 1969, the single "Happy Days In New York City" backed with "My Friend Is Here". Both were original tracks. It was released on Laurie Records.

By 1971, Lavoie had started calling himself Lobo (Spanish for wolf). Gernhard was an executive for Big Tree Records, and the company released his first single, "Me and You and a Dog Named Boo". The first major hit for the label, it reached number 5 in the US and launched a successful series of singles. The song also reached number 4 in the UK.

His debut album, Introducing Lobo, followed that May. In June his second single, "She Didn't Do Magic", was released. In September, "California Kid And Reemo" was released. Another single was The Albatross. It was around this time that Big Tree Records was merged with Bell Records. In the confusion, Lobo's second album Close Up was lost and never released.

Maintaining the Lobo alias, he released Of a Simple Man in 1972, which yielded back-to-back Top 10 hits, including "Don't Expect Me To Be Your Friend", which reached #8 in the US charts, and "I'd Love You to Want Me". "I'd Love You To Want Me" was Lobo's biggest hit, climbing to #2 on the Billboard charts in 1972, and later reached #1 in Germany and in mid-1974, #5 in the United Kingdom.

With the release of Calumet in 1973, Lobo had three more Top 40 hits: "It Sure Took a Long, Long Time," "How Can I Tell Her" and "Standing at the End of the Line." He made an appearance on American Bandstand that year and also released a fourth single from Calumet, "There Ain't No Way." A fifth, "Standing At The End Of The Line" was released in 1975.

In June 1974 Lobo's fourth album Just A Singer. It was the first album by Lobo to contain tracks not written by Lobo. The only single from the album was "Rings".

His last Top 30 single for Big Tree, "Don't Tell Me Goodnight", was released in 1975. Lobo also released the album, A Cowboy Afraid Of Horses and his last single for Big Tree, "Would I Still Have You", was released. The label followed up with a compilation that year, "The Best Of Lobo".

In 1976, Lobo started to break from Big Tree and Phil Gernhard, releasing the album Come With Me in Europe on the Philips label. "At First Sight" was the single. Neither were released in US.

1977 Lobo signed with Curb Records in 1977 and released the single "Afterglow", which was co-produced by Lobo and Gernhard. Another single, "You Are All I Ever Need" was released in 1978. It was last single to have Gernhard as producer.

In 1979, Lobo resurfaced on MCA Records, where he was paired with producer Bob Montgomery and released the single "Where Were You When I Was Falling In Love", which reached #23. He also released his first US album in four years, Lobo. Other singles for Curb were "Holding On For Dear Love", "With A Love Like Ours" and "Fight Fire With Fire".

Dissatisfied with the production of his records, Lobo sought a release from his Curb contract. He moved to Nashville and in 1981 he started his own label, Lobo Records, and released several singles including "I Don't Want To Want You", written by his brother, Roger Lavoie, "Come Looking For Me" and "Living My Life Without You". All making the country charts.

NOTE: The 1981 Disco Single by LOBO - "The Caribbean Disco Show" (Mercury - 1981) is not the same person as this Lobo.

Lobo Records became Evergreen Records in 1985. It released two singles, "Am I Going Crazy" and "Paint The Town Blue", a duet with Robin Lee.

Meanwhile, Lobo's popularity was growing in Asia, fanned by the release of his greatest hits compilations in 1987 and 1988.

In 1989, Lobo released his first new album in 10 years, Am I Going Crazy, made in Taiwan on UFO/WEA records and produced by Billy Aerts.

With his popularity in Asia sustained by the reissue of all his albums on CD, he signed a multi-album deal with PonyCanyon Records in Singapore, releasing Asian Moon (repackaging of tracks from Am I Going Crazy along with newly recorded tracks) in 1994, Classic Hits (re-recorded Lobo hits and some cover versions other artists' hits) in 1995 and in 1996 Sometimes (all new original songs). On another Asian label, Springroll Entertainment, he released You Must Remember This in 1997, an album of pop standards that was released in two formats, one with vocals and the other with instrumental tracks.

The East Asian financial crisis in 1997 drove his record labels out of business and Lobo retired to his home in Florida.

Retirement was short-lived, however, as in 2000 Lobo signed with a German record company, Gmbh Entertainment, and recorded a few tracks for various Hits CD's. He also co-wrote two Christmas songs with Billy Aerts, "A Big Kid's Christmas" and "Late Christmas Eve", which have been released on various Christmas compilations from 2000 to present.

Singles recorded during this period include "Caribbean Disco Show", "Let It Be Me", "Who'll Stop The Rain" and "Different Drum". These were all available on different "Greatest Hits" releases.

His popularity in Asia is having a resurgence, and in 2006 he toured in Southeast Asia.

Strangely, his music has been sampled by Melbourne experimental band Kooties, although they paid little respect to Lobo's original intentions.

In 2008 Lobo released his first new album in over 10 years. Out of Time features some new songs as well as the old favorites. Out of Time represents a step back to the original era of these recordings, revisiting his old songs the same way he wrote them; by doing all the instruments himself, they are Out of Time. It refers to the classic nature of the old songs, how they are still favorites, even though they don’t follow the norm of today’s songs.

Sours: https://www.last.fm/music/Lobo/+wiki

Songs lobo hit

Lobo (musician)

American singer-songwriter

Lobo

Lobo - TopPop 1973 04.png
Birth nameRoland Kent LaVoie
Born (1943-07-31) July 31, 1943 (age 78)
Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
GenresFolk rock, soft rock, country pop
Occupation(s)Singer-songwriter
InstrumentsVocals, guitarist
Years active1961–present
LabelsLaurie, Big Tree, MCA, Lobo Records, Curb, Pony Canyon
Associated actsThe Rumours (Gram Parsons, Jim Stafford)
Websitefansoflobo.com

Musical artist

Roland Kent LaVoie (born July 31, 1943), better known by his stage name Lobo, (which is a Spanish word for wolf), is an American singer-songwriter who was successful in the early 1970s, scoring several U.S. Top 10 hits including "Me and You and a Dog Named Boo", "I'd Love You to Want Me", and "Don't Expect Me to Be Your Friend".[1] These three songs, along with "Where Were You When I Was Falling in Love", gave Lobo four chart toppers on the Easy Listening/Hot Adult Contemporary chart.

Career[edit]

1961–1970: Early years[edit]

Born in Tallahassee, Florida, LaVoie was raised by his mother in Winter Haven, Florida, with his six siblings. He began his musical career in 1961 as a member of a local band, The Rumours. The band included Gram Parsons and Jim Stafford, as well as drummer Jon Corneal, who later joined Parsons' International Submarine Band.

In 1964, while attending the University of South Florida, LaVoie joined a band called the Sugar Beats and met producer Phil Gernhard. He recorded a regional hit for the band, a cover of Johnny Rivers' song, "What Am I Doing Here?"

During the 1960s, LaVoie performed with many other bands, including US Male, The Uglies, and Me and the Other Guys. It was in the latter band that he met musician Billy Aerts, who became a member of Lobo's touring band in the early 1970s and produced Lobo's comeback album in 1989.

Again working with Gernhard, his first solo record was released in 1969 on Laurie Records. It included the original tracks "Happy Days in New York City" backed with "My Friend Is Here".

1971–1975: Success with Big Tree[edit]

By 1971, LaVoie had started calling himself Lobo (Spanish for wolf). Gernhard was an executive for Big Tree Records, and the company released his first single, "Me and You and a Dog Named Boo" in March 1971. The first major hit for the label, it reached No. 5 in the US and No. 4 in the UK by May of that year, launching a successful series of singles. It sold over one million copies and was awarded a gold disc in September 1971.[2]

His debut album, Introducing Lobo, followed that May. In June 1971 his second single, "She Didn't Do Magic", was released. In September of the same year, "California Kid and Reemo" was released, followed by The Albatross. When Big Tree Records merged with Bell Records, Lobo's second project album Close Up was never released.

Under the Lobo alias, he then released Of a Simple Man in 1972, which included back-to-back U.S. Top 10 hits, including "I'd Love You to Want Me" (No. 2, November 18–25, 1972) and "Don't Expect Me to Be Your Friend" (No. 8, February 17–24, 1973). The former became Lobo's biggest hit, a million-seller gaining gold disc status in November 1972[2] and internationally reaching No. 1 in Germany in December 1973 and No. 5 in the United Kingdom in July 1974.

With the release of Calumet in 1973, Lobo had three more Top 40 hits: "It Sure Took a Long, Long Time", "How Can I Tell Her", and "Standing at the End of the Line". He made an appearance on American Bandstand that year. There were two further minor hit singles from the album, "There Ain't No Way" and "Love Me for What I Am".

In June 1974 Lobo's fourth album, Just a Singer, was released. It was the first album by Lobo to contain tracks not written by him. The only single from the album was "Rings". "Don't Tell Me Goodnight" in 1975 became his last Top 30 single for Big Tree. Lobo also released the album, A Cowboy Afraid of Horses with "Would I Still Have You" released as a single. The label followed it up with a compilation album that year entitled The Best of Lobo.

1976–1985: Curb Records, and move to Nashville[edit]

In 1976 Lobo broke away from Big Tree, releasing the album Come with Me in Europe on the Philips label. "At First Sight" and "It's Everywhere" were the singles. Neither was released in the US.

Lobo signed with Curb Records in 1977, releasing the single "Afterglow", co-produced by Lobo and Gernhard, and in 1978 "You Are All I'll Ever Need". No full-length album materialized from these sessions.

In 1979 Lobo was signed to Curb/MCA Records, where he worked with producer Bob Montgomery, releasing the single "Where Were You When I Was Falling in Love", which reached No. 23. The song also reached No. 1 on the Adult Contemporary chart. He also released his first US album in four years, Lobo. Other singles for Curb were "Holding On for Dear Love", "With a Love Like Ours", and "Fight Fire with Fire".

Reportedly dissatisfied with the production of his records, Lobo sought a release from his Curb contract. He moved to Nashville and, in 1981, started his own label, Lobo Records, releasing several singles including "I Don't Want to Want You" (written by his brother, Roger LaVoie), "Come Looking for Me", and "Living My Life Without You", all of which charted in the country charts. He also released "Bull Smith Can't Dance the Cotton Eye Joe" with the group Wolfpack, which included Narvel Felts and Kenny Earl.

Lobo Records was renamed Evergreen Records in 1985. The label released two of his singles, "Am I Going Crazy" and "Paint the Town Blue", the latter a duet with Robin Lee.

1987–present: Asian popularity and recent years[edit]

Although he is far less followed now in the United States, Lobo's popularity grew in Asia, fanned by the release of his greatest hits compilations in 1987 and 1988. This encouraged him to release in 1989 his first new album in 10 years, entitled Am I Going Crazy. It was recorded in Taiwan on UFO/WEA Records and was produced by Billy Aerts. He signed a multi-album deal with PonyCanyon Records in Singapore, and in 1994 released Asian Moon, repackaging some of the tracks from Am I Going Crazy along with newly recorded material. His follow-up album Classic Hits in 1995 were re-recordings of Lobo hits and some cover versions. In 1996 he released the album Sometimes, containing all new original songs.

On another Asian label, Springroll Entertainment, he released You Must Remember This in 1997, an album of pop standards that was released in two formats, one with vocals and the other with instrumental tracks.

In 2000, Lobo signed with a German record company, Gmbh Entertainment, and recorded a few tracks for various hits CDs. He also co-wrote two Christmas songs with Billy Aerts, "A Big Kid's Christmas" and "Late Christmas Eve", which have been released on various Christmas compilations from 2000 to present. Singles recorded during this period include "Let It Be Me", "Who'll Stop the Rain", and "Different Drum".

In 2006, based on his Asian popularity, he toured in Southeast Asia. In 2008, Lobo released Out of Time with old favorites and some new songs. A tribute album to the original era of the early Lobo recordings was made available from the website.

Lobo was among hundreds of artists whose material was destroyed in the 2008 Universal Studios fire.[3]

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Compilations[edit]

  • 1975 The Best of Lobo (Big Tree)
  • 1990 Greatest Hits (Curb)
  • 1993 The Best of Lobo (Rhino)
  • 1996 The Best of Lobo (Curb)
  • 1996 I'd Love You to Want Me (Rhino)
  • 1997 Me & You & a Dog Named Boo & Other Hits (Rhino)
  • 2004 The Very Best of Lobo (WEA International)
  • 2005 Introducing Lobo/Of a Simple Man (Wounded Bird)
  • 2005 Platinum Collection
  • 2006 Ultimate Collection (EMI) Malaysia
  • 2006 Me & You & a Dog Named Boo & Other Hits (Collectables)
  • 2007 Greatest Hits (Lobo Records)

Singles[edit]

Year Single Chart positions
USUS
AC
US CountryAUS
[4]
NZ
[4]
UK
[5]
1964 "What Am I Doing Here with You?" [as The Sugar Beats]
1966 "It's Gonna Be So Hard" [as The Uglies]
1969 "Happy Days in New York City" [as Kent LaVoie]
1971 "Me and You and a Dog Named Boo" 5 1 8 1 4
"She Didn't Do Magic" 46
b/w "I'm the Only One" 76*14
"California Kid and Reemo" 72 19
1972 "We'll Make It – I know We Will" 108*
b/w "The Albatross" 128*
"A Simple Man" 56 17
"I'd Love You to Want Me" 2 1 1 1 5
"Don't Expect Me to Be Your Friend" 8 1 4 4
1973 "It Sure Took a Long, Long Time" 27 3 49 14
"How Can I Tell Her" 22 4 49
"There Ain't No Way" 68 29 94
b/w "Love Me for What I Am" 86
1974 "Standing at the End of the Line" 37 25
"Rings" 43 8
1975 "Don't Tell Me Goodnight" 27 2
"Would I Still Have You" 44
1976 "At First Sight"
"It's Everywhere"
1977 "Afterglow"
1978 "You Are All I Ever Need"
1979 "Where Were You When I Was Falling in Love" 23 1 94
"Holdin' On for Dear Love" 75 13
1980 "With a Love Like Ours"
"Fight Fire with Fire"
1981 "I Don't Want to Want You" 40
1982 "Come Looking for Me" 63
"Bull Smith Can't Dance the Cotton-Eyed Joe" (with Wolfpack)88
"Living My Life Without You" 88
1985 "Am I Going Crazy" 57
"Paint the Town Blue" (with Robin Lee)49

US chart is Billboard unless otherwise noted. * Cash Box singles chart.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Lobo Songs (Top Songs/Chart Singles Discography)". Musicvf.com. Retrieved May 8, 2011.
  2. ^ abMurrells, Joseph (1978). The Book of Golden Discs (2nd ed.). London: Barrie and Jenkins Ltd. p. 297. ISBN .
  3. ^Rosen, Jody (June 25, 2019). "Here Are Hundreds More Artists Whose Tapes Were Destroyed in the UMG Fire". The New York Times. Retrieved June 28, 2019.
  4. ^ abcKent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992 (illustrated ed.). St Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. p. 180. ISBN .
  5. ^Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 326. ISBN .
  6. ^Whitburn, Joel (2015). The Comparison Book Billboard/Cash Box/Record World 1954–1982. Sheridan Books. p. 307. ISBN .

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobo_(musician)
L O B O _ 1992 _ THE BEST OF (FULL DISC)

Hmm, probably awareness of the reality of the world. Acceptance of this world as it exists. Assimilation with the inhabitants of this world. The gradual process of socialization and the fading feeling of apathy that has been my companions in recent years.

Similar news:

The handcuffs there were quite real, and I knew for sure that without a key they would not be so easy to open. Undress him, - he threw me off the bed. On the floor, and pressure on I dont remember how old I was then, but my mothers stepfather had already appeared.

It was a plump, huge bear. He worked according to his own schedule and each time showed up at home in a different way.



8649 8650 8651 8652 8653