Macbook laptop 2016

Macbook laptop 2016 DEFAULT

MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports) - Technical Specifications

Finish

Display

  • Retina display
  • 13.3-inch (diagonal) LED-backlit display with IPS technology; 2560-by-1600 native resolution at 227 pixels per inch with support for millions of colors
  • Supported scaled resolutions: 
    • 1680 by 1050
    • 1440 by 900
    • 1024 by 640
  • 500 nits brightness
  • Wide color gamut (P3)

Processor

  • 2.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i5, Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz, with 4MB shared L3 cache
    Configurable to 2.4GHz dual-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.4GHz, with 4MB shared L3 cache

Storage1

  • 256GB
    256GB PCIe-based onboard SSD
    Configurable to 512GB or 1TB SSD

Memory

  • 8GB of 1866MHz LPDDR3 onboard memory
    Configurable to 16GB of memory

Graphics

Charging and Expansion

Two Thunderbolt 3  (USB-C) ports with support for:

  • Charging
  • DisplayPort
  • Thunderbolt (up to 40 Gbps)
  • USB 3.1 Gen 2 (up to 10 Gbps)

Keyboard and Trackpad

  • Full-size backlit keyboard with: 
    • 78 (U.S.) or 79 (ISO) keys including 12 function keys and 4 arrow keys
    • Ambient light sensor
    • Force Touch trackpad for precise cursor control and pressure-sensing capabilities; enables Force clicks, accelerators, pressure-sensitive drawing, and Multi-Touch gestures

Wireless

  • Wi-Fi
    802.11ac Wi-Fi wireless networking; IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n compatible
  • Bluetooth
    Bluetooth 4.2 wireless technology

Camera

Video Support

Simultaneously supports full native resolution on the built-in display at millions of colors and:

  • One display with 5120-by-2880 resolution at 60Hz at over a billion colors
  • Up to two displays with 4096-by-2304 resolution at 60Hz at over a billion colors

Thunderbolt 3 digital video output

  • Native DisplayPort output over USB‑C
  • VGA, HDMI, and Thunderbolt 2 output supported using adapters (sold separately)

Audio

  • Stereo speakers with high dynamic range
  • Two microphones
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack

Battery and Power2

  • Up to 10 hours wireless web
  • Up to 10 hours iTunes movie playback
  • Up to 30 days of standby time
  • Built-in 54.5-watt-hour lithium-polymer battery
  • 61W USB-C Power Adapter

Electrical and Operating Requirements

  • Line voltage: 100V to 240V AC
  • Frequency: 50Hz to 60Hz
  • Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)
  • Storage temperature: –13° to 113° F (–25° to 45° C)
  • Relative humidity: 0% to 90% noncondensing
  • Operating altitude: tested up to 10,000 feet
  • Maximum storage altitude: 15,000 feet
  • Maximum shipping altitude: 35,000 feet

Size and Weight

  • Height: 0.59 inch (1.49 cm)
  • Width: 11.97 inches (30.41 cm)
  • Depth: 8.36 inches (21.24 cm)
  • Weight: 3.02 pounds (1.37 kg)3

Operating System

macOS Sierra
macOS is the operating system that powers everything you do on a Mac. macOS Sierra introduces Siri to Mac4 — along with new ways to enjoy your photos, shop more securely online, and work more seamlessly between devices.
Learn more

Accessibility

Accessibility features help people with disabilities get the most out of their new MacBook Pro. With built-in support for vision, hearing, physical and motor skills, and learning and literacy, you can create and do amazing things.
Learn more

Features include:

  • VoiceOver
  • Zoom
  • Increase Contrast
  • Reduce Motion
  • Siri and Dictation
  • Switch Control
  • Closed Captions
  • Text to Speech

Built-in Apps5

  • Photos
  • iMovie
  • GarageBand
  • Pages
  • Numbers
  • Keynote
  • Siri
  • Safari
  • Mail
  • FaceTime
  • Messages
  • Maps
  • Notes
  • Calendar
  • Contacts
  • Reminders
  • Photo Booth
  • Preview
  • iTunes
  • iBooks
  • App Store
  • Time Machine

What’s in the Box

  • 13-inch MacBook Pro
  • 61W USB-C Power Adapter
  • USB-C Charge Cable (2 m)

Configure to Order

Configure your MacBook Pro with these options, only at apple.com:

  • 2.4GHz dual-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.4GHz, with 4MB shared L3 cache
  • 16GB of 1866MHz LPDDR3 onboard memory
  • 512GB or 1TB PCIe-based onboard SSD

MacBook Pro and the Environment

Apple takes a complete product life cycle approach to determining our environmental impact. Learn more

MacBook Pro is designed with the following features to reduce its environmental impact:

  • Mercury-free LED-backlit display
  • Arsenic-free display glass
  • BFR-free
  • PVC-free6
  • Beryllium-free
  • Highly recyclable aluminum enclosure
  • Meets ENERGY STAR 6.1 requirements
  • Rated EPEAT Gold7

Apple and the Environment
Learn more about Apple’s dedication to reducing the environmental impact of our products and process. Or read our Product Environmental Reports for detailed information on the environmental performance of every Apple product.

Recycling
Apple takes a holistic view of materials management and waste minimization.
Learn more about how to recycle your Mac

Accessories

Mac Software

  • Final Cut Pro X
  • Logic Pro X

Displays and Adapters

  • LG UltraFine 4K Display
  • LG UltraFine 5K Display
  • Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 Adapter
  • USB-C to USB Adapter
  • USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter
  • USB-C VGA Multiport Adapter
  • USB-C to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter

AirPort and Wireless

  • AirPort Express
  • AirPort Extreme
  • AirPort Time Capsule

Other Accessories

  • USB-C to Lightning Cable
  • USB-C Charge Cable
  • 61W USB-C Power Adapter
  • Magic Keyboard
  • Magic Trackpad 2
  • Magic Mouse 2

Acoustic Performance

Declared noise emission values in accordance with ECMA-109

 Sound Power Level
L W A,m (B)
Sound Pressure Level
Operator Position
L p A,m (dB)
Idle1.25 (K V =0.25)3.5
Wireless web1.25 (K V =0.25)3.5
  1. LA,m is the mean A-weighted sound power level, rounded to the nearest 0.05 B.
  2. L p A,m is the mean A-weighted sound pressure level measured at operator position (rounded to the nearest 0.5 dB).
  3. 1 B (bel) = 10 dB (decibel)
  4. K v is the statistical adder for computing upper-limit of A-weighted sound power level.
  5. The quantity, L W A,c (formerly called L W Ad) may be computed from the sum of L W A,m and K v .
  6. The Wireless web test browses 25 popular websites.
  7. Configuration tested: 2GHz dual-core Intel i5 processor, 8GB memory, 1TB storage, Intel Iris Graphics 540 1536 MB.

  1. 1GB = 1 billion bytes and 1TB = 1 trillion bytes; actual formatted capacity less.
  2. Testing conducted by Apple in October 2016 using preproduction 2.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i5-based 13-inch MacBook Pro systems with a 256GB SSD and 8GB of RAM (wireless web test, iTunes movie playback test, and standby test). Testing conducted by Apple in October 2016 using preproduction 2.9GHz dual-core Intel Core i5-based 13-inch MacBook Pro systems with a 512GB SSD and 8GB of RAM (wireless web test and iTunes movie playback test) and preproduction 2.9GHz dual-core Intel Core i5-based 13-inch MacBook Pro systems with a 256GB SSD and 8GB of RAM (standby test). The wireless web test measures battery life by wirelessly browsing 25 popular websites with display brightness set to 12 clicks from bottom or 75%. The iTunes movie playback test measures battery life by playing back HD 1080p content with display brightness set to 12 clicks from bottom or 75%. The standby test measures battery life by allowing a system, connected to a wireless network and signed in to an iCloud account, to enter standby mode with Safari and Mail applications launched and all system settings left at default. Battery life varies by use and configuration. See www.apple.com/batteries for more information.
  3. Weight varies by configuration and manufacturing process.
  4. Siri may not be available in all languages or in all areas, and features may vary by area.
  5. iMovie, GarageBand, Pages, Numbers, and Keynote are available on the Mac App Store. Downloading apps requires an Apple ID and a device that is compatible with the OS version required for each app.
  6. PVC-free AC power cord available in all regions except India and South Korea.
  7. MacBook Pro achieved a Gold rating from EPEAT in the U.S. and Canada.
Sours: https://support.apple.com/kb/SP747

Apple MacBook (2016) review: MacBook still short on ports, but this improved minimalist laptop is more tempting than ever

Otherwise, aside from a RAM bump here and a slight price drop there, the 2017 batch is very similar to the one from 2016, with the same enclosures, ports, trackpads and screens. But be forewarned: Buying a new MacBook Pro may require you to invest in a variety of adapters for your legacy devices. Also note that the 13-inch MacBook Pro from 2015 has been discontinued, though the $1,999 15-inch model of that vintage remains available for those who want all the ports and fewer dongles.

Watch this: Apple's MacBook Pro gets an early upgrade

Fall 2016 update

In October 2016, Apple updated its laptop portfolio, delivering an overdue refresh of its 13- and 15-inch MacBook Pros. Considerably slimmer and lighter than their predecessors, the new models come equipped with larger Force Touch trackpads and Apple's new, dynamic Touch Bar. (A 13-inch model without the Touch Bar was also announced.) And the Touch Bar is very cool: the mini touch strip contextually changes to icons in different apps and sliders, hot keys, and function buttons emerge on the fly as needed.

The new models make some potentially difficult tradeoffs, however. Perhaps the most significant one is that the new MacBook Pros have fewer ports than the older ones. The previous generation had a total of 7: Two USB, two Thunderbolt 2 (in the form of Mini DisplayPort jacks), HDMI, SD, MagSafe and headphone. Besides a headphone jack, the new 15-inch model has four -- and they're all of the Thunderbolt/USB-C variety. The new 13-inch Touch Bar model also has four (all Thunderbolt) but the 13-inch model without Touch Bar has only two!

Be warned: Buying a new MacBook Pro will likely force you to invest in a variety of adapters for all your legacy devices. (Ironically, you won't be able to connect Apple's own iPhone 7, with its Lightning Connector, to any of the new MacBook Pros without an adapter.)

The new 13-inch MacBook Pros have Intel Core-i processors that are faster than the older 12-inch model's Intel Core-m series; they also support Thunderbolt 3 and come equipped with more USB-C ports. But they're a full pound heavier and cost at least $200 more. The new 13-inch model with the TouchBar starts at $1,799, £1,749 and AU$2,699; the 13-inch model without it starts at $1,499, £1,449 and AU$2,199; and the new 15-inch model starts at $2,399, £2,349 and AU$3,599. The older MacBooks, which remain available, start at $1,299, £1,249 and AU$1,999 (12- or 13-inch Pro) and $1,999, £1,899 and AU$2,999 (15-inch Pro).

The Apple laptop portfolio still includes the 13-inch MacBook Air -- with specs unchanged -- but the 11-inch MacBook Air is now available only to the educational market; to buy one, you'll need to be associated with a school or university or find one online somewhere. Not sure which one is right for you? Consult CNET's full head-to-head comparison of the entire lineup of MacBooks, including the Pro and Air models, as well as Apple's new MacBook lineup: What you need to know.

Editors' note: The review of Apple's 12-inch MacBook Pro, originally published in April 2016, follows.

The modest updates to Apple's 12-inch MacBook laptop don't go far enough to make it the new must-have machine for everyone. At the same time, there's a sizable enough boost to performance and battery life that the system can no longer be considered an outlier only suited for a very limited audience that values portability over productivity.

Nor is it the only player in the game. Since the 2015 original, we've seen super-thin laptops such as the upcoming HP Spectre shaving millimeters from previous versions, or tablet hybrids such as the Microsoft Surface Pro 4 and Samsung Galaxy TabPro S showing off what Intel's new Core M chips can do in a small, reasonably priced package.

But even if it's closer to the middle of the road than the it was last year, the 12-inch MacBook is still a love-it-or-hate-it laptop. It seems to inspire either fierce loyalty or intense derision, at least judging from comments on my review of the original version, and social media feedback on any follow-up stories since. A new set of updates for 2016, including new processors for faster performance and better battery life, plus a new rose gold color option, may help throw off some of that shade, but not all.


Indeed, I liked the 2015 version of the MacBook, despite its many limitations. It relied on Intel's initially unimpressive Core M processor, and its performance and battery life compared unfavorably to the bigger MacBook Air and Pro systems. The keyboard was unusually shallow, in order to fit into such a thin body. And most of all, the single USB-C port was a hard pill to swallow for those convinced of the need for separate power, video, and data ports.

It was not the perfect laptop for everyone, or even most people. But over time, I found myself appreciating Apple's exercise in strictly enforced minimalism. I turned to it more and more often, especially for on-the-go computing in coffee shops around New York, eventually declaring it as my all-around favorite (as of March 2016, at least). But, it could still get bogged down with too many programs and windows open, and the battery life wasn't at the level where it could go days and days between charging sessions. The USB issue turned out to be less serious than I feared, and only two or three times in the months after the product's original release did I find myself stymied by a lack of ports (although when I did get stuck with a USB key and a misplaced converter dongle, it was very annoying).

With this 2016 update, Apple has addressed some, but not all, of the issues with the original. Both this system, and other computers with the second generation of Core M processors (confusingly part of Intel's sixth generation of Core chips, also known by the codename Skylake), are closer to the mainstream levels of performance seen in laptops with more common Core i3 and Core i5 processors from Intel.

Along with new Core m3 and m5 CPUs (the M series now follows the same 3/5/7 format as the Core i-series chips), the new MacBook gets Intel's updated 515 integrated graphics, which won't make you a gamer, but may help with video application performance. The speed of the internal flash memory has also improved, but I doubt that's something casual users would even notice.

Frankly, the most obvious difference between the 2016 MacBook and the 2015 model is the new addition of a fourth color option, rose gold, which is already available on iPhones and iPads. Sadly, our review sample is a rather straitlaced space gray (silver and gold are the other two options).

Note also that we're testing the step-up model, which costs $1,599 in the US (£1,299 and AU$2,199), and includes an Intel Core m5 processor and a big 512GB of storage. The base $1,299 model (£1,049 and AU$1,799) has the Core m3 and 256GB of storage.

Color aside, the body is identical to last year's model, weighing a hair over two pounds and measuring 13.1mm thick. The HP Spectre packs a 13-inch display (but only a 1,920x1,080-resolution one) into a 10.4mm body, but at the cost of more weight, at 2.45 pounds. That coming-soon HP also uses Core i5 and Core i7 CPUs, which should give it a significant performance boost. It's becoming increasingly obvious that PC makers need to balance size, weight, performance and battery life, but can usually max out two out of those four at best.

Apple MacBook (2016)

Price as reviewed$1,599
Display size/resolution12-inch 2,304 x 1,440 screen
PC CPU 1.2GHz Intel Core M5-6Y54
PC Memory 8GB DDR3 SDRAM 1866MHz
Graphics 1536MB Intel HD Graphics 515
Storage512GB flash storage
Networking 802.11ac wireless, Bluetooth 4.0
Operating system Apple El Capitan OSX 10.11.4


A keyboard you may like, but won't love

This is still the thinnest Mac that Apple has ever made. Part of the reason for that is the butterfly mechanism under the keyboard. The nearly edge-to-edge keyboard has very large key faces, yes, but the keys are shallow, barely popping up above the keyboard tray and depressing into the chassis only slightly. It takes some getting used to, especially if you're accustomed to the deep, clicky physical feedback of other MacBooks or the similar island-style keyboards of most other modern laptops. It took a while to get used to, and it'll never be my favorite keyboard, but I found it was easy to acclimate to after a few days of heavy usage, and I've easily written more than 100,000 words on the 2015 version of this system.

The touchpad retains the Force Touch feature found in both the previous MacBook and the current 13-inch MacBook Pro. (A version of this migrated to the iPhone 6S and 6S Plus as 3D Touch.) A set of four sensors under the pad allow you to "click" anywhere on the surface, and the Force Click effect, which combines the sensors with haptic feedback (or, as Apple calls it, "taptic"), allows you to have two levels of perceived clicking within an app or task. That deep click feels to the finger and brain like the trackpad has a stepped physical mechanism, but in fact, the movement you feel is a small horizontal shift, which, even when fully explained, still feels like you're depressing the trackpad two levels.

I'm more of a tapper than a clicker, and the first thing I do on any new MacBook is turn on tap-to-click in the settings menu (which is still inexplicably turned off by default), so I have not given Force Touch much thought since it was introduced, with the exception of deep-clicking on addresses occasionally to bring up a contextual map pop-up. Here's another Mac trackpad tip: besides the tapping feature under the trackpad preferences menu, you should go to the accessibility menu and look under Preferences > Accessibility > Mouse & Trackpad > Trackpad options to turn on tap-to-drag.

A small but sharp screen

The 12-inch Retina display has a 2,304x1,440-pixel resolution, which gives you a very high pixel-per-inch density, as well as an aspect ratio that sticks with 16:10, as opposed to the 16:9 aspect ratio found on nearly every other laptop available now, and in HDTV screens.

The slightly glossy screen works from wide viewing angles and is very clear and bright. On-screen icons, text and images all scale well to be very viewable despite the smaller size and higher resolution. While the bezel around the display is thin, it's nowhere as minimalist as the barely there bezel on the excellent Dell XPS 13.

Audio remains thin, best suited for YouTube videos or single-viewer Netflix experiences. While Apple has owned the Beats brand for a while now, there's no sign of any kind of Beats-enhanced audio in any Macs yet.

Another issue carried over from the previous version is the webcam, which is still just a low-res 480p model, which leads to generally soft images when using FaceTime, Photo Booth, or other camera apps.

Still the elephant in the room

If you ask 10 people about the 12-inch MacBook -- assuming they know enough about this product to differentiate it from other MacBooks -- and they'll all say something along the lines of: "That's the one with just one USB-C port, right?"

There were hopes that we'd see a second port, either USB-C or something else, in this updated model, but that was not to be. The use of a single port for data, video and power -- and a not-quite-mainstream one at that -- remains the most bedeviling thing about this laptop.

And yet, using the 2015 MacBook fairly heavily over a course of months, I also found it wasn't nearly the deal breaker some had feared. The battery life was long enough that I didn't need to worry about taking up the power port to connect an external peripheral, and frankly, so many things have migrated to the cloud, that I've even removed the once-ubiquitous key-shaped USB drive from the keychain, where it hung for many years.

Yes, if you need a wired Ethernet connection on a daily basis, use sneakernet-delivered USB keys every day, or need to send a video output to an external monitor, it can be a real pain. There are USB-C dongles and adaptors available for each and every eventuality, but they're inconvenient and often expensive. A simple USB-C to USB-A adapter is $20, while Apple's big multiport dongle that gives you HDMI, USB-A and USB-C (the latter for pass-through charging) is $80.

Through hands-on testing, I've concluded I can mostly survive in a single-port world, but that won't be true for everybody.

Core M, take two

The original pitch for Core M was that it enabled laptops to be very thin and light, but still powerful and long-lasting. That was an appealing idea, but the first-gen Core M chips found in premium-priced systems such as this and the Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro didn't live up to the hype in terms of performance and battery life. Of those early models, the MacBook was the most impressive, likely because Apple was able to tune both the hardware and operating system to work optimally with that still-new CPU. Despite that, the 2015 MacBook could slow down at times, with too many windows and tabs open, and with very large documents and files in use.

The handful of systems we've tested with the newer, second wave of Core M chips, including the Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro S and HP Spectre x2, have all felt zippier, even if still lagging behind full-size laptops with Core i5 processors. With this updated MacBook, you can get a new Core m3 or Core m5 processor. We're testing the better Core m5 version, so it's not going to be an exact comparison to the original 12-inch MacBook.

So far, in a couple of days of use, this Core m5 system feels faster than the older model, not so much in terms of minute-to-minute responsiveness or opening apps, but in that there were fewer moments where the system seemed to slow down or lag when pushed. The benchmark results reflect this, and while it felt like you'd be pushing your luck to use the 2015 MacBook as your mission-critical, all day, every day computer, I feel more confident in this more powerful update, although we'll need more extensive hands-on use to say for sure.

Battery life in this new version is, by Apple's account, about an hour longer than a system with the first-gen Core M CPU would get. In an online video streaming test, the MacBook ran for 10:33, which is about a half hour longer than the most-recent 13-inch MacBook Pro. We're continuing to run other battery tests, and will update this review with additional results.

An even better laptop, but still with caveats

In hands-on use, the new MacBook feels almost exactly like the previous version. If you've got the 2015 MacBook, there's no need to upgrade, but if you were holding off to see what the second generation looked like, the potential boost to performance and battery life makes me feel even more confident about using this as primary laptop, especially for frequent travelers. However, the lack of ports and the feel of the keyboard will still be enough to discourage some, especially those who are looking for a laptop that will stay tethered to a desk for all day, every day.

Keep in mind, too, that we'll almost certainly see updated MacBook Pro laptops later in 2016, possibly as early as Apple's WWDC event in June.

Multimedia Multitasking test 3.0

Apple MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016)505Microsoft Surface Pro 4519Apple MacBook (12-inch, 2016)702Apple MacBook (12-inch, 2015)830Samsung Galaxy TabPro S856


Geekbench 3 (Multi-Core)

Microsoft Surface Pro 46775Apple MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016)6729Apple MacBook (12-inch, 2016)5879Samsung Galaxy TabPro S4722Apple MacBook (12-inch, 2015)2838



Streaming video playback battery drain test

Apple MacBook (12-inch, 2016)633Apple MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016)608Samsung Galaxy TabPro S563Microsoft Surface Pro 4298



System Configurations

Apple MacBook (12-inch, 2016)Apple El Capitan OSX 10.11.4; 1.2GHz Intel Core m5-6Y54; 8GB DDR3 SDRAM 1866MHz; 1536MB Intel HD Graphics 515; 512GB SSD
Apple MacBook Air (13-inch, 2015)Apple Yosemite OSX 10.10.2; 1.6GHz Intel Core i5-5250U; 4GB DDR3 SDRAM 1600MHz; 1536MB Intel HD Graphis 6000; 128GB SSD
Samsung Galaxy TabPro SMicrosoft Windows 10 Home (64-bit); 2.2GHz Intel m3-6Y30; 4GB DDR3 SDRAM 1600MHz; 128MB (dedicated) Intel HD Graphics 515; 128GB SSD
Apple MacBook (12-inch, 2015)Apple Yosemite OSX 10.10.2; 1.1GHz Intel Core M-5Y31; 8GB DDR3 SDRAM 1600MHz; 1536MB Intel HD Graphics 5300; 256GB SSD
Microsoft Surface Pro 4Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (64-bit) 2.4GHz Intel Core i5-6300U; 8GB DDR3 SDRAM TK; 128MB (dedicated) Intel HD Graphics 520; 256GB SSD
Sours: https://www.cnet.com/reviews/apple-macbook-2016-review/
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It's best to think of the 2016 MacBook as a MacBook S. Similar to the evolution from the iPhone 6 to the iPhone 6s, Apple didn't revamp the design for its ultraslim 2-pound laptop. Instead, the company focused mostly on internal upgrades for the 12-inch MacBook ($1,299 to start; $1,599 as configured). These enhancements include a more powerful 6th-generation Core M processor, faster flash storage and an extra hour of battery life. This is a more capable sequel for sure. For this kind of money, though, I wanted more -- namely, an extra USB Type-C port and other improvements.

The 12-inch MacBook is better than its predecessor, but it still involves compromises.

Design

The 12-inch MacBook remains a beautiful piece of hardware, made of sturdy aluminum and measuring just 0.5 inches thick. Apple added a rose-gold color option to the mix, which I tested, to go along with space gray, gold and silver. Yes, the rose-gold MacBook has a pink hue to it, but I didn't mind being seen using this laptop on the bus or at Starbucks. After all, (at least some) guys wear power pink shirts, too.

What I like most about the MacBook is that I can use it while commuting or flying and still have plenty of room to work when the person in front of me reclines. It's also so light that I would sometimes forget whether the notebook was in my backpack.

By comparison, the aluminum-clad HP EliteBook Folio boasts an even thinner 0.47-inch profile and weighs a slightly heavier 2.2 pounds. But that's justified by the larger, 12.5-inch screen. With its 13-inch display, the Vaio Z weighs 2.56 pounds and is a chunkier 0.66 inches, while the Dell XPS 13 is 2.7 pounds and 0.33 to 0.6 inches thick. Lenovo's 14-inch ThinkPad X1 Carbon packs a much larger display and keyboard but weighs 2.6 pounds and is 0.59 to 0.65 inches thick.

MORE: MacBook vs. Air vs. Pro: What Should You Buy?

One-Port Problem Remains

The MacBook's extreme minimalism may be a selling point, but the lone USB Type-C port is still a problem for me. If I want to plug in the laptop's power cable and attach an external display or another device, such as the iPhone, at the same time, I need to connect the USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter ($79), which has a power port, USB 3.0 port and HDMI port.

Apple sells other adapters, including a $25 USB-C-to-Lightning cable (for iPhones and iPads) and a $19 USB-C-to-USB cable (for cameras and other USB devices).

While the ecosystem of USB-C peripherals has grown, I still wish the MacBook would grow another USB-C port.

There are also third-party options from Belkin and SanDisk, including a 64GB USB-C flash drive ($79). There are plenty of other options available, too, but while the ecosystem of USB Type-C peripherals has grown, I still wish the MacBook would grow another USB Type-C port.

Another bummer: You can't connect more than one monitor to the MacBook at the same time --something I do every day with the MacBook Pro. However, Pluggable claims that you can connect the MacBook to its Plugable USB-C Triple Display Docking Station to power multiple monitors. We were able to use this dock to power two external monitors at 2K resolution simultaneously (2048 x 1152) with one HDMI connection and one DVI, but the 4K output to a single monitor using this accessory wasn't reliable during our initial testing.

Keyboard: Flat But Fast

To achieve the MacBook's razor-thin profile, the MacBook sports a flat keyboard that uses a unique butterfly mechanism. As I noted in my review of last year's model, the keys have very little travel -- just 0.5 millimeters. That's half of what the MacBook Air provides (1 mm), and also shallower than the keys on the Vaio Z (1.04 mm) and the XPS 13 (1.2 mm).

Nevertheless, I grew accustomed the MacBook's layout within a couple of hours, and I typed a fast-for-me 78 words per minute on the 10FastFingers.com typing test, with only two errors. That compares to my average of 77 wpm and one error on the 13-inch Air. The MacBook's keyboard isn't comfortable, but I found it perfectly usable.

Force Touch Touchpad: Still Magical

Even after a year, I'm pretty amazed by how the MacBook's large, 4.4 x 2.7-inch Force Touch trackpad tricks your brain into thinking that it's physically clicking down when you press it. It's not. Instead, the pad uses a Taptic Engine to deliver haptic feedback. It worked brilliantly as I clicked on links, opened apps and selected text.

The MacBook's 12-inch display is so sharp and colorful it makes me want to throw out my MacBook Air.

As with last year's MacBook, the Force Click feature lets you save time by deep pressing on items. For example, you can look up the definition of a word by Force Clicking it, or you can preview a web page or preview an address in Maps with a deep press. However, I wound up disabling this feature, because I found it difficult to move icons around in the Dock with Force Click turned on.

Display: Just Awesome

The MacBook's 12-inch display is so sharp and colorful that it makes me want to throw out my MacBook Air. The laptop has a resolution of 2304 x 1440 pixels, which blows away the Air's low-res 1400 x 900 panel.

MORE: Why 78 Percent of Laptop Screens Suck

When I watched the 4K trailer for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story on this panel, a fiery explosion that sent Stormtroopers flying had intense sparks of yellow and orange, and a close-up of Felicity Jones in gleaming black armor neatly reflected the lights surrounding her.

Registering 327 nits on our light meter, the MacBook's screen is in between the brightness readings for the touch-screen version of the XPS 13 (336 nits) and the nontouch XPS 13 (318 nits), and higher than the ThinkPad X1 Carbon (292 nits for full HD, 257 for 2560 x 1440). However, the Vaio Z's display hit a sky-high 548 nits.

The MacBook's display can produce an impressive 107 percent of the color gamut, which beats the touch XPS 13 and the ThinkPad X1 Carbon (both less than 105 percent). However, the Vaio Z reached 117 percent.

Apple should not get a pass for stuffing a low-resolution 480p camera into a $1,299 laptop.

Apple's panel is also quite color accurate, notching a Delta-E error rate of 0.99 (0 is perfect). While that's not as good as the X1 Carbon or the Vaio Z (0.5 to 0.8 range), it trumps the touch XPS 13 (3.13) and the category average (2.7).

Audio: Surprisingly Strong

I continue to be surprised by the MacBook's audio quality given its thin profile. When I streamed Iggy Pop's "Lust for Life," the pulsating drums meshed well with the vocals, and the speaker (located above the keyboard) produced loud volume without distortion. The ominous horns in the Rogue One trailer, as well as the piercing laser cannon fire from thudding AT-ATs, came through clearly.

Webcam: 480p, Really?

Apple should not get a pass for stuffing a low-resolution 480p camera into a $1,299 laptop. It's not that I video chat often, but when I do, I don't want to look like a pile of grain, as I did when testing the FaceTime app. I could live with an extra millimeter of thickness, if that's what it would take.

Performance: A Sizable Boost

The biggest changes to the 2016 MacBook are its internal components, which include a 6th-generation Core M processor, 8GB of RAM and faster flash storage (256GB or 512GB). You have your choice of a 1.1-GHz Core m3 or 1.2-GHz Core m5 CPU, and we tested the latter chip.

The Core m5 processor and faster flash memory add up to a much more capable ultraportable.

Overall, I found this machine more responsive than its predecessor when opening apps and switching among 10 or more tabs in Google Chrome, but there were still times when OS X's spinning ball appeared, such as when I tried to search for one app while downloading another in the Mac App Store.

On the Geekbench 3 benchmark, which measures overall performance, the Core m5-powered MacBook scored 5,906. That smokes last year's MacBook (4,631) and also beats the latest 13-inch, Core i5-powered MacBook Air (5,783), though the latter system has an older 5th-generation Core Series CPU. The XPS 13, the ThinkPad X1 Carbon and the Vaio Z, all of which had 6th Generation Core i5 processors, predictably scored a higher 6,374; 6,828; and 7,252, respectively.

The updated MacBook also benefits from faster PCIe-based flash storage. On our file-transfer test, in which we time how long it takes to move about 5GB of files, the MacBook took a brisk 14.3 seconds, which translates to 355.9 MBps. Neither the touch or the nontouch version of the XPS 13 crossed 250 MBps, but both the X1 Carbon and the Vaio Z managed 419 MBps with their PCIe drives.

If you're wondering whether the MacBook can crunch numbers, don't worry. This laptop took just 3 minutes and 11 seconds to match 20,000 names and addresses in OpenOffice. That's more than a minute faster than the XPS 13, and 40 seconds ahead of the Vaio Z. The X1 Carbon took 4:14. Remember, though, that we tested the Core m5 version of the MacBook; the Core m3 version will be slower.

Graphics

The integrated Intel 515 graphics in the MacBook will be fine for editing photos and playing some light Mac games, such as Rayman Origins, but don't expect more than that.

On the benchmark for the DiRT 3 racing game, the MacBook mustered just 27 frames per second at its native resolution with all of the details on low, and various effects (such as multisampling and VSync) turned off. That's below 30 fps, our threshold for playability. Still, the action seemed relatively smooth.

Heat: A Bit Toasty on the Bottom

The MacBook registered fairly cool temps after we streamed Hulu video for 15 minutes, but it ran warm on the underside of the system. The touchpad and the area between the G and H keys stayed below our 95-degree comfort threshold, at 84 and 90 degrees, respectively. However, the bottom of the notebook reached 100 degrees. That's 5 degrees warmer than last year's MacBook.

Battery Life: An Hour Better

Apple promises up to 10 hours of battery life on the new MacBook when surfing the web, and it got close to that mark.

On the Laptop Mag Battery Test, which involves continuous web surfing at 100 nits of screen brightness, the system lasted a strong 9 hours and 38 minutes. That's about an hour longer than last year's MacBook.

The MacBook's runtime soundly beat that of the touch-screen version of the XPS 13 (8:08) but was well behind the nontouch model (11:54). The Vaio Z and X1 Carbon lasted 9:04 and 9:06, respectively. However, the 13-inch MacBook Air lasted an astounding 14:40.

MORE: Laptops with the Longest Battery Life

With the screen on full brightness and when running multiple programs, the MacBook was down to 53 percent after 2.5 hours, so you'll want to keep it on half brightness or less to squeeze out extra juice.

Configuration Options

Apple offers two configurations of the MacBook. The $1,299 base model comes with a Core m3 processor, 8GB of RAM and 128GB of flash storage. Jumping up to $1,599 will get you a faster Core m5 CPU and double the storage.

I'd opt for the pricier config, because if you're going to spend this much on a laptop, it should be as powerful -- and offer as much room for your digital stuff -- as possible.

Bottom Line

The 2016 MacBook is certainly an improvement over its predecessor. It's significantly faster, especially if you opt for the Core m5 model, and it lasts an hour longer on a charge, all while being extremely portable. I also continue to love the Retina display and don't really mind the flat butterfly keyboard. However, for this kind of money, I would really like to plug in a power cable and a second device sans a dongle, and I believe anything in this price range should be able to power two external monitors.

To be fair, not everyone works like I do. Some won't care about attaching peripherals (or at least as often), and for them, the MacBook will be pretty close to a dream machine. It's tailor-made for frequent travelers or corridor warriors constantly bouncing from meeting to meeting. But it's too pricey for most students. For them, I'd recommend the 11-inch Air or the 13-inch MacBook Air (or wait for them to be refreshed) or the XPS 13.

Overall, the new MacBook is a compelling laptop, but a few tweaks would turn this very good ultraportable into a great one.

Apple MacBook (2016) Specs

BluetoothBluetooth 4.0
BrandApple
CPU1.2-GHz Core m5
Company Websitewww.apple.com
Display Size12
Graphics CardIntel HD Graphics 515
Hard Drive Size512GB SSD
Hard Drive TypeSSD
Native Resolution2304 x 1440
Operating SystemOS X El Capitan
Ports (excluding USB)USB-C
RAM8GB
Size11.04 x 7.74 x 0.14-0.52 inches
Touchpad Size4.4 x 2.7 inches
Warranty/SupportOne-year limited warranty with 90 days free telephone support
Weight2.03 pounds
Wi-Fi802.11ac

Less

Responsible for the editorial vision for Laptopmag.com, Mark Spoonauer has been Editor in Chief of LAPTOP since 2003 and has covered technology for nearly 15 years. Mark speaks at key tech industry events and makes regular media appearances on CNBC, Fox and CNN. Mark was previously reviews editor at Mobile Computing, and his work has appeared in Wired, Popular Science and Inc.
Sours: https://www.laptopmag.com/reviews/laptops/macbook-2016
2016 15\

MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2016) - Technical Specifications

    

Touch Bar

  • Touch Bar with integrated Touch ID sensor

Finish

Display

  • Retina display
  • 15.4-inch (diagonal) LED-backlit display with IPS technology; 2880-by-1800 native resolution at 220 pixels per inch with support for millions of colors
  • Supported scaled resolutions: 
    • 1920 by 1200
    • 1680 by 1050
    • 1280 by 800
    • 1024 by 640
  • 500 nits brightness
  • Wide color gamut (P3)

Processor

  • 2.6GHz
    2.6GHz quad-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.5GHz, with 6MB shared L3 cache
    Configurable to 2.9GHz quad-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.8GHz, with 8MB shared L3 cache
  • 2.7GHz
    2.7GHz quad-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.6GHz, with 8MB shared L3 cache
    Configurable to 2.9GHz quad-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.8GHz, with 8MB shared L3 cache

Storage1

  • 256GB
    256GB PCIe-based onboard SSD
    Configurable to 512GB, 1TB, or 2TB SSD
  • 512GB
    512GB PCIe-based onboard SSD
    Configurable to 1TB or 2TB SSD

Memory

  • 16GB of 2133MHz LPDDR3 onboard memory

Graphics

  • 2.6GHz
    Radeon Pro 450 with 2GB of GDDR5 memory and automatic graphics switching
    Intel HD Graphics 530
    Configurable to Radeon Pro 460 with 4GB of GDDR5 memory and automatic graphics switching
  • 2.7GHz
    Radeon Pro 455 with 2GB of GDDR5 memory and automatic graphics switching
    Intel HD Graphics 530
    Configurable to Radeon Pro 460 with 4GB of GDDR5 memory and automatic graphics switching

Charging and Expansion

Four Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports with support for:

  • Charging
  • DisplayPort
  • Thunderbolt (up to 40 Gbps)
  • USB 3.1 Gen 2 (up to 10 Gbps)

Keyboard and Trackpad

  • Full-size backlit keyboard with: 
    • 64 (U.S.) or 65 (ISO) keys including 4 arrow keys
    • Touch Bar with integrated Touch ID sensor
    • Ambient light sensor
    • Force Touch trackpad for precise cursor control and pressure-sensing capabilities; enables Force clicks, accelerators, pressure-sensitive drawing, and Multi-Touch gestures

Wireless

  • Wi-Fi
    802.11ac Wi-Fi wireless networking; IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n compatible
  • Bluetooth
    Bluetooth 4.2 wireless technology

Camera

Video Support

Simultaneously supports full native resolution on the built-in display at millions of colors and:

  • Up to two displays with 5120-by-2880 resolution at 60Hz at over a billion colors
  • Up to four displays with 4096-by-2304 resolution at 60Hz at over a billion colors

Thunderbolt 3 digital video output

  • Native DisplayPort output over USB‑C
  • VGA, HDMI, and Thunderbolt 2 output supported using adapters (sold separately)

Audio

  • Stereo speakers with high dynamic range
  • Three microphones
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack

Battery and Power2

  • Up to 10 hours wireless web
  • Up to 10 hours iTunes movie playback
  • Up to 30 days standby time
  • Built-in 76.0-watt-hour lithium-polymer battery
  • 87W USB-C Power Adapter

Electrical and Operating Requirements

  • Line voltage: 100V to 240V AC
  • Frequency: 50Hz to 60Hz
  • Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)
  • Storage temperature: –13° to 113° F (–24° to 45° C)
  • Relative humidity: 0% to 90% noncondensing
  • Operating altitude: tested up to 10,000 feet
  • Maximum storage altitude: 15,000 feet
  • Maximum shipping altitude: 35,000 feet

Size and Weight

  • Height: 0.61 inch (1.55 cm)
  • Width: 13.75 inches (34.93 cm)
  • Depth: 9.48 inches (24.07 cm)
  • Weight: 4.02 pounds (1.83 kg)3

Operating System

macOS High Sierra
macOS is the operating system that powers everything you do on a Mac. macOS High Sierra brings new forward-looking technologies and enhanced features to your Mac. It’s macOS at its highest level yet.*
Learn more about latest operating system

Accessibility

Accessibility features help people with disabilities get the most out of their new MacBook Pro. With built-in support for vision, hearing, physical and motor skills, and learning and literacy, you can create and do amazing things.
Learn more about Accessibility

Features include:

  • VoiceOver
  • Zoom
  • Increase Contrast
  • Reduce Motion
  • Siri and Dictation
  • Switch Control
  • Closed Captions
  • Text to Speech

Built-in Apps4

  • Photos
  • iMovie
  • GarageBand
  • Pages
  • Numbers
  • Keynote
  • Siri
  • Safari
  • Mail
  • FaceTime
  • Messages
  • Maps
  • Notes
  • Calendar
  • Contacts
  • Reminders
  • Photo Booth
  • Preview
  • iTunes
  • iBooks
  • App Store
  • Time Machine

What’s in the Box

  • 15-inch MacBook Pro
  • 87W USB-C Power Adapter
  • USB-C Charge Cable (2 m)

Configure to Order

Configure your MacBook Pro with these options, only at apple.com:

  • 2.9GHz quad-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.8GHz, with 8MB shared L3 cache
  • Radeon Pro 460 with 4GB of GDDR5 memory and automatic graphics switching
  • 512GB, 1TB, or 2TB PCIe-based onboard SSD

MacBook Pro and the Environment

Apple takes a complete product life cycle approach to determining our environmental impact. Learn more about MacBook Pro and the Environment 

MacBook Pro is designed with the following features to reduce its environmental impact:

  • Mercury-free LED-backlit display
  • Arsenic-free display glass
  • BFR-free
  • PVC-free5
  • Beryllium-free
  • Highly recyclable aluminum enclosure
  • Meets ENERGY STAR 6.1 requirements
  • Rated EPEAT Gold6

Apple and the Environment
Learn more about Apple’s dedication to reducing the environmental impact of our products and process. Or read our Product Environmental Reports for detailed information on the environmental performance of every Apple product.

Recycling
Apple takes a holistic view of materials management and waste minimization.
Learn more about how to recycle your Mac

Accessories

Mac Software

  • Final Cut Pro X
  • Logic Pro X

Displays and Adapters

  • LG UltraFine 4K Display
  • LG UltraFine 5K Display
  • Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 Adapter
  • USB-C to USB Adapter
  • USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter
  • USB-C VGA Multiport Adapter
  • USB-C to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter

AirPort and Wireless

  • AirPort Express
  • AirPort Extreme
  • AirPort Time Capsule

Other Accessories

  • USB-C to Lightning Cable
  • USB-C Charge Cable
  • 87W USB-C Power Adapter
  • Magic Keyboard
  • Magic Keyboard with Numeric Keypad
  • Magic Trackpad 2
  • Magic Mouse 2

Acoustic Performance

Declared noise emission values in accordance with ECMA-109

 Sound Power Level
L W A,m (B)
Sound Pressure Level
Operator Position
L p A,m (dB)
Idle1.70 (K V = 0.25)9.0
Wireless web1.70 (K V = 0.25)9.0
  1. L W A,m is the mean A-weighted sound power level, rounded to the nearest 0.05 B.
  2. L p A,m is the mean A-weighted sound pressure level measured at operator position (rounded to the nearest 0.5 dB).
  3. 1 B (bel) = 10 dB (decibel)
  4. K v is the statistical adder for computing upper-limit of A-weighted sound power level.
  5. The quantity, L W A,c (formerly called L W Ad) may be computed from the sum of L W A,m and K v .
  6. The Wireless web test browses 25 popular websites.
  7. Configuration tested: 2.7GHz quad-core Intel Core i7 processor, 16GB memory, 512GB storage, Radeon Pro 455 with 2GB of GDDR5 memory and automatic graphics switching Intel HD Graphics 530.

* Some features will be available on September 25, 2017, with macOS High Sierra.

  1. 1GB = 1 billion bytes and 1TB = 1 trillion bytes; actual formatted capacity less.
  2. Testing conducted by Apple in October 2016 using preproduction 2.6GHz quad-core Intel Core i7-based 15-inch MacBook Pro systems with a 256GB SSD and 16GB of RAM. The wireless web test measures battery life by wirelessly browsing 25 popular websites with display brightness set to 12 clicks from bottom or 75%. The iTunes movie playback test measures battery life by playing back HD 1080p content with display brightness set to 12 clicks from bottom or 75%. The standby test measures battery life by allowing a system, connected to a wireless network and signed in to an iCloud account, to enter standby mode with Safari and Mail applications launched and all system settings left at default. Battery life varies by use and configuration. See www.apple.com/batteries for more information.
  3. Weight varies by configuration and manufacturing process.
  4. iMovie, GarageBand, Pages, Numbers, and Keynote are available on the Mac App Store. Downloading apps requires an Apple ID and a device that is compatible with the OS version required for each app.
  5. PVC-free AC power cord available in all regions except India and South Korea.
  6. MacBook Pro achieved a Gold rating from EPEAT in the U.S. and Canada.
Sours: https://support.apple.com/kb/SP749

2016 macbook laptop

Apple Macbook Pro 13 2016

Apple Macbook Pro 13 2016 is faster, thinner and more powerful than its predecessor and is extremely lightweight at only 1.37 kg. Apple has introduced a number of new features with this device. An important feature is the Touch ID sensor which is integrated into the power button and enables instant access to logins and fast, secure online purchases with Apple Pay. Apple Macbook Pro 13 2016  runs MacOS Sierra and is powered by 6th generation dual core Intel Core i5 clocked at 2 GHz with Turbo Boost up to 3.1 GHz coupled with integrated Intel HD Graphics 540. It sports a 13.3 inch IPS LED Backlit Retina Display with 2560 x 1600 pixels resolution, 500 nits brightness and Wide color gamut. On the memory front, it is equipped with 8GB DDR3 RAM at a speed of 1866 MHz and 256 GB SSD.

It features a 720p FaceTime HD camera, Full size backit keyboard, Force Touch trackpad for precise cursor control and pressure-sensing capabilities and a Lithium Polymer battery that keeps the device running for10 hours. The connectivity options available on the device are WiFi, Bluetooth 4.2, Headphone jack and Two USB Type-C ports which support Thunderbolt 3 as well as USB 3.1 Gen 2 speeds. It integrates data transfer, charging, and video output in a single connector, delivering up to 40 Gbps of throughput for twice the bandwidth of Thunderbolt 2. As far as audio or sound quality is concerned, the speakers have been redesigned and are now placed on either side of the keyboard and provide as much as twice the dynamic range and up to 58 percent more volume, with two and a half times louder bass for maximum boom. It comes in two colour variants- Silver and Space Grey.

Sours: https://www.digit.in/laptops/apple-macbook-pro-13-2016-price-51665.html
แกะกล่อง MacBook Pro 2016 with Touch Bar โอ้ววว

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