Hybrid guitar amp

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Best guitar amps tube, solid-state and modeling amplifiers for all levels and budgets

Besides the guitar itself, a decent guitar amp is one of the most significant purchase a guitarist will make. Indeed, an amp is arguably more important to your overall tone than the guitar! Your first 'proper' amp is likely to be based on something that your heroes play, but you'll soon end up wanting something that better fits your own playing style. That’s where our expert guide to the best guitar amps comes in

The amp is the key to the door marked ‘tone’. Whether you use overdrive pedals to provide your gain, or you're looking for your amp to provide full bore distortion on its own, the amp you go for will determine the overall character your audience hears out front.

There's a dizzying array of amps on the market, so you need to do some thorough research before pulling the trigger to figure out what's right for you. Thankfully we've done all that hard work for you, pinning down the best heads, combos and modelers from Mesa/Boogie, Orange, Marshall, Vox and many more, as part of our list of the best guitar amps you can buy right now. And we've even found the best prices for 'em, too!

Are you looking for a great deal on the best guitar amps this Black Friday? Check out our Black Friday guitar deals page for the latest news, and the best deals around.

If you'd like to read more in-depth buying advice, click the 'buying advice' button above. If you'd rather get straight to the products, keep scrolling.

Best guitar amps: Guitar World's choice

An elite-level touring guitar amp costs some serious dollar, which puts it out of the reach of most players. But if you've got the budget, however, the Mesa/Boogie Mark Five: 25 is just about the best guitar amp we’ve heard for the money. It marries up versatility, build quality and class, with an astonishing range of tones. If you treat the amp like an investment, as something that will see you through the next 20 years of playing, then the Mark Five: 25 actually represents decent value for money.  

If, on the other hand, you need something a bit more financially realistic – for players of any level – then the Boss Katana MkII is easy to recommend. Gone are the days of inexpensive solid-state and modeling amps that promise so much but fail to deliver. The Katana delivers five killer amp characters backed up by amazing effects – as you’d expect from Boss – with plenty in the way of extra tools and tricks.

Best guitar amps: Product guide

1. Orange Micro Terror

The tiniest of tiny terrors

Price: $/£ | Watts: 20 | Type: Hybrid | Preamp tubes: 12AX7 | Power amp tubes: Solid-state | Speakers: N/A

Compact

Cheap

Not full-tube

Not that loud

With a tube preamp and a solid-state power amp, the Orange Micro Terror manages to stay shockingly tiny while delivering 20 watts of output. Through a 4x12 it's deceptively massive, although because it's so low in wattage, there's not really a true 'clean' sound on offer.

Still, it's approximately a million times better than the entry-level amps we had when we were younger, and at a push you could probably play small shows with them. We've switched out one of our amps with the Micro after a technical difficulty in the past (yes, it's small enough to bring as a backup in your pedalboard case), and we don't think the crowd noticed.

That said, it is relatively quiet, and the Tiny Terror is noticeably louder when you're playing out. Still, for the price, who can argue?

2. Positive Grid Spark Guitar Amp

The smartest amp on the market

Price: $/£ | Watts: 40 | Type: Modeling | Preamp tubes: N/A | Power amp tubes: N/A | Speakers: 2x4” custom designed speakers

Impressive smart features

Bluetooth compatible for streaming music

Spark app unlocks even more tones 

Nothing at this price 

The Positive Grid Spark has taken the amp world by storm. Integrating the already highly respected BIAS tone engine with some pretty incredible smart technology was only ever going to be a good thing, and it definitely doesn’t disappoint. 

Onboard, there’s 30 amp models and 40 effects. There’s bluetooth connectivity to stream music, as well as &#;” Aux and headphone inputs. You’ve got USB inputs and outputs too, which enable you to use your Spark as an audio interface for when you need to capture that next great idea.

The Spark is also packed full of learning tools that will help you develop as a player, and have fun while doing it. Those features include ‘Auto Chords’ - which will find chord charts for any song you choose - and ‘Smart Jam’ - which will generate an authentic backing track to accompany you, whatever you play. 

Read the full Positive Grid Spark review 

3. Boss Katana MkII

Could be all you ever need from a guitar amp

Price: $/£ | Watts: 50 | Type: Solid-state with digital effects | Preamp tubes: N/A | Power amp tubes: N/A | Speakers: N/A

Wide range of sounds

Great value

Needs the software for deep editing

It’s helpful for learner guitarists to choose an amp that will allow them to experiment with different sounds. As great as tube amps are, they tend to stick to one core job and focus on doing that brilliantly. Digital effects, on the other hand, give the player a chance to try out different sounds and combinations of effects to find the sound that suits them best. 

The Boss Katana MKII is, in many ways, the perfect ‘first’ or backup amp for most people. It packs in a host of Boss effects, along with a selection of great sounding amp models, and will easily manage the step up from practice to small gig. Hooking the Katana up to your computer grants you access to deep editing of parameters, while we also loved the way it can record direct into a digital audio workstation via USB.

Read our full Boss Katana MkII review 

4. Fender Hot Rod Blues Junior IV

This amp may be small, but it’s mean too

Price: $/£ | Watts: 15 | Type: Tube | Preamp tubes: 12AX7 | Power amp tubes: EL84 | Speakers: 12” Celestion A-Type

Classic tone

Compact

Not very versatile

Not cheap

For an amp to gig small clubs, play at home, or in practice, there are few amps more practical than Fender mini combos. We like the Jr IV because it has a 12" speaker, which to our ears is always substantially fuller and more balanced than most 10" speakers out there.

Though this amp only really does one thing, it does it well; however, due to its size it does break up rather easily, making it not always the best option for pristine cleans. It's also a bit of a studio secret weapon for this reason, as it can be driven to early hard saturation.

Read the full Fender Hot Rod Blues Junior IV review

5. Vox AC15 C1

The best guitar amp for a vintage vibe with class to spare

Price: $/£ | Watts: 15 | Type: Tube | Preamp tubes: 12AX7 | Power amp tubes: EL84 | Speakers: 12” Celestion G12M Greenback

Nails that iconic Vox tone

You’ll love the tremolo!

Not one for the high gain fans

Launched over 60 years ago, the Vox AC15 is the veteran of the pack in this best guitar amps guide. Yet still people gravitate towards that famous grille, lured in by the promise of one of the guitar world’s most recognisable tones. Everyone from the Beatles to Brian May has used Vox AC amps over the years, drawn towards one of the warmest clean tones out there.

The Vox AC15 is a superb choice for rock, pop and blues, and we particularly liked the built-in tremolo and reverb sounds which make for some epic surf-rock tones.

6. PRS MT15 Mark Tremonti Head

Longtime PRS man gets signature lunchbox amp

Price: $/£ | Watts: 15 | Type: Tube | Preamp tubes: JJ EC83S | Power amp tubes: 6L6 | Speakers: N/A

Quality high gain tones

Separate EQ for each channel

No onboard reverb

Mark Tremonti and PRS have established themselves as one of the longest-running endorser/endorsee partnerships in the guitar world. Between them, the pair have offered up stacks of affiliated signature guitar models, but the PRS MT15 marks the first time they’ve collaborated on an amp.

The MT 15 follows the standard lunchbox amp blueprint, packing in two channels and switchable output power to make for an ideal tool for practice, recording and small shows. It’s geared towards higher gain fans, with the 6L6 power amp tubes dealing up plenty in the way of treacle-thick saturation. The included FX loop is a nice touch, as is the individual EQ controls for both channels, making the PRS MT15 a decent package for the gain fiend in your life. 

Read the full PRS MT 15 Mark Tremonti Head review

7. Blackstar HT Club 40 MKII

Likeable everyman amp rebooted

Price: $/£ | Watts: 40 | Type: Tube | Preamp tubes: ECC83 | Power amp tubes: EL34 | Speakers: 12” Celestion

UK/USA voicing switch offers versatility

Great-sounding reverb

May be too many options for some players

We’re yet to come across anyone with an overly extreme or negative opinion on Blackstar’s range of reasonably-priced tube amps. You hear phrases like solid, dependable, reliable and unpretentious, and that’s no bad thing. Take the Blackstar HT Club 40 MKII, for example, which is the brand’s mid-range offer. It doesn’t pack in crazy features you’ll never use, or cost a fortune, or fall apart every time you load in after a show. If you want high gain, sure, it can throw down the filth with the best of them. Likewise, if you want an authentic, bell-like clean sound, no problem.

Like the rest of the HT family, the Blackstar HT Club 40 MKII is a Good Solid Amp that will do you proud without breaking the bank. It may not set your heart alight with every power chord, but it’ll certainly get the job done. 

8. Hughes & Kettner TubeMeister Deluxe TM20 Head

Technical wizardry meets German engineering

Price: $/£ | Watts: 20 | Type: Tube | Preamp tubes: 12AX7 | Power amp tubes: EL84 | Speakers: N/A

Modern features

Compact

Only 20W

The EQ profile of Hughes & Kettner's flagship tube heads has always been somewhat controversial. With a tube layout that's akin to a Marshall and a genesis in hot-rodding Marshalls, it's always surprising how much smoother the cleans of an H&K are, even if the gains are fierce.

The TubeMeister Deluxe packs enough power for small gigs, but can also be run all the way down to 0W for true silent practicing. It's got an integrated H&K Red Box DI, which means that either live or in the studio it's easy to get consistent tones.

Finally, it's pretty compact. Not as svelte as the Victory or the Orange, but given that you can pick one up new for two-thirds the price of the Victory, it's good value for money if you like the distinctive H&K sound.

9. Marshall SC20H Studio Classic

This downsized JCM is ground zero for the modern Marshall sound

Price: $1,/£ | Watts: 20 | Type: Tube | Preamp tubes: ECC83 | Power amp tubes: EL34 | Speakers: N/A

Classic tones

Looks amazing

Few extra shiny features

Compared to some of the amps on this list, this mini JCM looks positively lacking in features. However, it reminds us that maybe you don't need the bells and whistles. Maybe what you really need is fantastic sounding amplification, and no distractions. If that idea resonates with you, then this is probably the amp for you.

From grunge to doom, to noise rock, the SC20H is a fantastic foundation for a guitar rig, it's built like a tank, and it's a classic for a reason. And, while the big version remains famously frill-free, Marshall has equipped the SC20H with an effects loop and direct recording output making it a beast of a studio amp. 

Read the full Marshall SC20H Studio Classic review

Victory VX The Kraken

Unleash the Kraken

Price: $1,/£1, | Watts: 50 | Type: Tube | Preamp tubes: 12AX7 | Power amp tubes: 6L6 or EL34 | Speakers: N/A

Range of tones

Compact

Only 50W

The signature guitar amp of British YouTube star Rabea Massaad, the Victory VX Kraken has some pretty impressive credentials. Based on the sound of the Marshall JCM and the Peavey Mark II, perhaps the defining modern amp for metal, an encounter with the Kraken sounds as intense as you’d expect from the name.

The result is an amp that contains incredible clean and dirt sounds, and also some of our favorite saturated gain sounds, in a compact package that you can easily gig with. In fact, it's small enough that you can fly with it as hand luggage.

Mesa/Boogie Mark Five: 25 Head

The best guitar amp for versatile cleans, and devastating gains

Price: $1,/£1, | Watts: 25 | Type: Tube | Preamp tubes: 12AX7 | Power amp tubes: EL84 | Speakers: N/A

Sounds amazing

Feature-packed

Price

The Mesa Mark V comes in a variety of sizes from the full-tilt 90W head down to a compact 25W offering. Though some features are streamlined or removed, the 25 loses none of the key tricks, while becoming small enough to take on public transport. 25 watts is just about enough to gig and record with, and there's a reason why the Mark IV and Mark V have become legendary.

Sure, partly it's about the prestige of Mesa amps in general, but the IV earned its stripes through session players seeking a Swiss-Army-Knife amp. The tubes used also offer a clue; whereas other Mesa heads like the DC5 used 6L6s for a more rectifier-like tone, the EL84s are a different beast, while the clean channel has a distinctly Fender-like chime about it.

However, with Mesas, the stock tones aren't really the whole story. With a three-band EQ and boost functionality, these can be radically altered into new territory, and the distinctive graphic EQ on the front panel allows for even more drastic tone shaping.

Peavey Invective

A metal head for the new generation

Price: $1,/£1, | Watts: | Type: Tube | Preamp tubes: 12AX7 | Power amp tubes: 6L6GC | Speakers: N/A

Excellent clean and gain channels

Modern features

Most don't need W

Price

When it comes to modern metal, there have been few players and producers as influential as Misha 'Bulb' Mansoor of Periphery. Obviously if you're looking for djenty modern metal then the Invective is more than capable of delivering, but it's for some of its other features that it's just as interesting.

Firstly, there's a range of power-switching options, meaning you don't have to run it full-blast at W the whole time. Second, there's a boost function that is modelled on the Ibanez Tubescreamer. This is because many modern metal tones are achieved by smashing the front-end of a tube amp using a Tubescreamer with the 'level' control all the way up.

Third, there's auxiliary power outs, so you can run your favourite pedals in the amp's effects loop using the amp as a power source.

Finally, though the amp itself is based on the +, a common complaint of the series has been a somewhat mediocre clean channel, something that Misha specifically fixed on the Invective. This makes this guitar amp far more than just part of the line, but a substantially more versatile improvement. This is fitting really, as EVH defined the new metal sound with his signature amps; maybe the Invective will do the same for a new generation.

Read the full Peavey Invective review

Kemper Profiler Powerhead

The most flexible of digital heads

Price: $2,/£1, | Watts: | Type: Profiler | Preamp tubes: N/A | Power amp tubes: N/A | Speakers: N/A

Versatile

Integrated power amp

Price

Sours: https://www.guitarworld.com/features/best-guitar-amps

If you’re looking at buying a guitar amp, you might get overwhelmed when you see all the different types of guitar amps out there. With so many different brands, shapes, sizes, and features, it can be hard to figure out what is the right guitar amp for you.

In this guide, let’s take a look at the different types of guitar amps out there and find which one might be right for you.

There are four main types of guitar amps: tube, solid state, modelling, and hybrid. Each type of amp uses a different type of technology to produce your tone. All four types of guitar amps also come in different configurations of speakers, which play a big part in shaping your tone.

Even if you think you already know what type of guitar amp is right for you, read through the information on all four types.

Knowing more about other types of amps will help you make sure you do make the right choice for your needs. As a guitar teacher, I often see guitarists with the wrong type of amp for their needs. Being open-minded about different types of amps will lead you to better gear.

Tube Guitar Amps (aka Valve Amps)

If you’ve ever heard somebody talk about guitar amps, you probably heard them talk at some point about tube amps (also known as valve amps). For many guitarists, tube amps are the pinnacle of amp technology and produce the best tone. Whether that’s true or not has been and will always be a hot debate because tone is completely subjective.

Tube amps are named after the vacuum tubes they use to drive the amp:

Guitar amp tube

The above photo shows a typical tube in a guitar amp. These tubes will heat up and glow orange when they’re cranked up. The basic idea is that when you crank up the tubes, they start to break up your signal and produce a smooth overdrive so many guitarists enjoy.

Tubes were used in all amplifiers before transistors were invented, but many guitarists still prefer to use a tube guitar amp today due to the warm tones they can produce.

If you hear somebody talk about valve amps, they’re the same as tube amps. “Valve” is an English term, while “Tube” is an American term. They both refer to the vacuum tubes/valves in the amp.

Compared to the other types of guitar amps covered later, tube amps use ancient technology. This adds to the appeal for some guitarists. Some guitarists like the idea of sticking to vintage gear and consider it “the real stuff”.

Other guitarists take a look at what is possible from modern guitar amp technology and decide that tube amps aren’t worth it. The right choice for you is to look at each type of guitar amp objectively and whether the type of amp fits your needs. Most guitarists don’t do this and as a result, they end up with an amp that doesn’t suit them.

While many guitarists will talk to you about the benefits of tube amps until they’re blue in the face, don’t feel like you need to buy a tube amp. They don’t suit all guitarists and having a tube amp doesn’t guarantee the best tone.

Guitar amp tubes back

The highly sought-after warm tone of a tube amp does come at a cost. Tube amps are typically far more expensive, heavier, and more fragile than other types of guitar amps.

The easiest way to tell if a guitar amp is a tube amp is to try and pick it up. You’ll notice a huge difference in weight in a tube amp compared to any other non-tube amp. Tube amps can be ridiculously heavy and fragile.

The extra weight is fine for at home use, but if you plan on traveling with your amp to gigs or band rehearsals, you might find the extra weight of a tube amp a hassle.

VOX AC30 guitar amp

The above amp, a VOX AC30, is a great example of a very popular tube amp. It might not look heavy, but at just over 70 lbs (32kg) it’s far heavier than a solid state or modelled combo amp. For example, the Line 6 AMPLIFi is a modelled combo amp that weighs 37lbs (17kg).

Tube Amp Pros:

  • Many guitarists feel tube amps produce the best tone
  • Tube amps are usually simple to use

Tube Amp Cons:

  • Tube amps tend to be more expensive
  • Tubes are fragile, will burn out, and require maintenance
  • Tube amps can be seriously heavy
  • Best tones from tube amps are usually only possible at high volumes
  • Many tube amps don’t produce good tones at low volumes
  • Compared to other types of guitar amps, tube amps are limited in the variety of tones they can produce

Even if you have your mind set on getting a tube amp, have a read through the different types of guitar amps to see how they compare. You may find tube amps suit you the best, or you may find a better alternative.

Solid State Guitar Amps

After the transistor was invented, a new type of guitar amp started to appear. Solid state guitar amps replace glass vacuum tubes with transistors on a printed circuit board.

The below photo compares a typical vacuum tube against a transistor:

Guitar amp tube vs transistor

It should be obvious that there’s a big difference between the two. A transistor is rock solid, extremely light, and reliable. A glass vacuum tube in comparison can break or burn out over time. The big advantage of transistors is that they won’t burn out as a vacuum tube will. They don’t require maintenance and should last a lifetime.

Tube vs Solid State Guitar Amps

It should be no surprise that solid state guitar amps can be far lighter than tube amps. You may have heard of transistors when people talk about fuzz pedals (find out about fuzz pedals and transistors here). For many guitarists, the big drop in weight and price is a big reason for choosing a solid state guitar amp over a tube amp.

When solid state guitar amps first came out, they were seen as cold and sterile. The warmth and inconsistencies that gave tube amps their character were suddenly gone when you plugged in a solid state amp.

For many guitarists, this was a step backwards. For guitarists in styles like Jazz where you want a sparkly clean tone, solid state amps were ideal.

Roland JC

The above amp is a Roland JC (JC stands for Jazz Chorus). The JC still stands out today as one of the best solid state amps available. For many jazz guitarists (and other similar styles), the tone it produces is perfect for their needs.

The above JC weighs 62lbs (28kg) which might sound like not much different than the VOX AC30 from earlier (at 70lbs / 32kg). But keep in mind the JC is a watt amp while the VOX AC30 is a watt amp.

The point to take away here is that different amps suit different types of guitarists. A rock guitarist might see a solid state amp as cold and sterile, while a jazz guitarist might see a tube amp as noisy and mushy.

It’s also worth mentioning that many rock guitarists enjoy using solid state amps and many jazz guitarists enjoy using tube amps. Every guitarist has different tastes and preferences in tone, so don’t let anybody tell you what type of gear you should be using.

Solid State Guitar Amp Pros:

  • Can produce crystal clear clean tones
  • Can be light and relatively cheap

Solid State Guitar Amp Cons:

  • Many guitarists don’t like the tones produced
  • Solid state amps are very limited compared to modelling amps

Solid state guitar amps aren’t as popular today as they have been mostly replaced by modelling amps.

Modelling Guitar Amps

Modelling guitar amps (sometimes called digital guitar amps) are an evolution over solid state guitar amps. These guitar amps use modern technology to produce a wide range of tones and effects.

The name ‘modelling’ comes from the idea that the amp tries to recreate the tone from a different type of amp. For example, a modelling amp may attempt to reproduce the tone of a Marshall tube amp without the use of tubes. Then with the press of a button, you can change to a modelled version of a classic VOX AC 30 or a Mesa Boogie.

The big advantage of modelling guitar amps is flexibility. Some modelling amps give you access to hundreds of different amp models, inbuilt effects, and presets.

When modelling guitar amps first started appearing, they quickly developed a terrible reputation. Guitarists called them digital rubbish and poor imitations of the real thing. If you try out an early model of a modelling guitar amp, you will probably agree.

Thankfully, as with any technology, modelling amps kept getting better over time. Every year saw improvements in modelling technology and better quality tones.

The gap between a “real” amp and a “modelled” amp started to narrow. Today, you can find hundreds of YouTube videos comparing “real” amps against modelled amps in blind tests. The below video is a great example of how realistic modelled guitar amps are today:

When listening to the examples from the above video, don’t try to think which one is “real” or “modelled”. It really doesn’t matter if you can correctly identify which is which. What really matters is if you like either or both of the tones the amps produce.

While there will always be guitarists that claim that “nothing beats the real thing”, the truth is modelling technology is at the point where a good quality modelling amp can sound almost indistinguishable from the non-modelled version.

The BOSS Katana is an example of a very popular modern modelling amp with a wide range of tone options:

Boss Katana KTN

The four main amp presets (plus an original BOSS acoustic amp) found on the BOSS Katana are based on these guitar amps: Roland JC (Clean), Fender Bassman (Crunch), Peavey Lead (Lead), Soldana SLO (Brown).

A modelling amp like this one gives you access to the guitar tones found on some of the most famous guitar amps in history. Some modelling amps allow you to access literally hundreds of different amp models all in one unit.

The Boss Katana KTN is a watt amp that weighs 25lbs (kg). When compared to the tube or solid state amps shown earlier, it should be obvious how much lighter a typical modelling amp can be.

This is partly why they’ve become so popular for guitarists going to band practice or gigs. Not only are they easy to transport, but they provide a lot of flexibility in tones.

Modelling Guitar Amp Pros:

  • Access to a large variety of guitar tones and effects
  • Significantly lighter than solid state or tube amps
  • Usually far lower in cost compared to other amp types

Modelling Guitar Amp Cons:

  • Older modelling amps don’t sound as good as the lastest modelling amps

If you’re looking at getting a modelling guitar amp, remember that modelling technology is constantly improving. So when it comes to modelling amps, if you have to choose between an older or newer model from the same brand, the latest model is usually the smart option.

Hybrid Guitar Amps

The last type of guitar amp worth mentioning is hybrid amps. Hybrid guitar amps are a bit of a weird type of amp. Just like hybrid cars are a weird mix of gasoline and electric, hybrid guitar amps are a weird mix of different amp technology.

The idea behind hybrid guitar amps is that they give you the best of both worlds. You have access to the sought-after tones produced by tubes and you also get access to the flexibility of solid state technology.

While that might sound great, hybrid amps can often be disappointing in the same way that hybrid cars often disappoint. A hybrid car has great advantages over a gasoline car, but it comes with compromises. A hybrid car has a gasoline engine, but that engine is nowhere near as good as a gasoline car’s engine like a Mustang. A hybrid car also runs on electricity, but it’s nowhere near as good as an all-electric car like a Tesla.

Hybrid cars are a compromise – it’s not as good as a gasoline car and not as good as an all-electric car. It’s somewhere in between.

It’s the same with hybrid guitar amps. Most guitarists will either prefer a classic tube amp or a modelling amp, but not a weird hybrid of the two. Hybrid guitar amps do suit some guitarists, but fewer and fewer guitarists are finding these type of amps appealing.

The Line 6 DT25 is a popular hybrid amp that makes use of Line 6’s modelling technology and combines it with real tubes (combo version shown below, but there is also a head version available):

Line 6 DT25

For some guitarists, a hybrid amp is the only time they will consider using modelling technology. For these guitarists, the tubes give the “real” character other modelling amps lack. Whether this is true for you or not depends on the type of tones you like from a guitar amp.

The DT25 combo weighs 47lbs (21kg) which is lighter than a typical tube amp, but heavier than a typical modelling amp.

Hybrid Guitar Amp Pros:

  • Access to a wider range of guitar tones and effects than a typical tube amp
  • Makes use of real tubes for that “authentic” guitar amp tone

Hybrid Guitar Amp Cons:

  • Heavier than typical modelling amps due to the tubes
  • More expensive than typical modelling amps
  • The difference in tone compared to a typical modelling amp may not make it worthwhile for you

Just like hybrid cars, hybrid guitar amps do suit some people. While there aren’t many hybrid guitar amps out there compared to tube or modelling amps, there are some great options worth considering.

How to Choose The Right Guitar Amp Type For You

Now that you’ve read through the four types of guitar amps, you should have a good idea on what type of you should get. Before you start to think about brands or amp models, be clear in what type of amp might suit your needs best.

For example, if you feel a tube amp would suit you best you can then start researching tube amps and find the brands and models that suit you. You can narrow your search down to tube amps and compare the different models from different makers and find the right tube amp for you.

This is a far better approach than what many guitarists do. Many guitarists start with a brand, then look for a model. This is a poor approach because it immediately restricts the wide range of amazing amps you could choose from.

Many guitarists are starting to realize that brand loyalty with guitar amp manufacturers is as silly as Apple vs Samsung loyalty. Even if you’ve been playing Marshall amps all of your life, it’s still worth checking out what other brands have on offer. As Joe Satriani says:

“Don’t worry about Peavey vs Marshall, worry about what sets you free” – Joe Satriani

The reason I want to emphasize this is because guitarists can often be closed-minded. I’ve seen many students over the years come to me with a horribly inappropriate amp for their needs because they were told to “only get a tube amp” or “nothing beats a Marshall”.

Instead of starting your amp research by thinking about brand, think about your answers to these questions:

  • Do I need to regularly transport the amp?
  • How loud does the amp need to be?
  • Will I be using pedals for my effects, or do I want to have the amp do everything?
  • How many different types of tones do I want to access?
  • What is my budget?
  • Will I be recording music with the amp?
  • Will I be performing live with the amp?

Take your time answering each of the above questions before you make your mind up on the type of amp to get.

Once you answer all of the questions, go through each of the four types of guitar amps and think about how closely each type fits with your needs.

Keep in mind that each type of amp can come in very different configurations. For example, while tube amps are typically heavy, there are tiny tube amp heads such as the Orange Tiny Terror you could match with a small speaker cabinet.

This approach gives you an easy way to objectively compare the different types of amps and help you work out which type really would fit your needs.

To learn more about guitar amps and how to get the most out of your amp, read through my Ultimate Guide to Guitar Amp Settings. Many guitarists have contacted me over the years to say that it was one of the most important articles they’ve read. So if you want to get the most out of your amp, check it out.

Categories Buyer's Guides, Essential Topics, GuidesTags ampSours: https://guitargearfinder.com/guides/different-types-of-guitar-amps-explained/
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Top 23 Hybrid Amplifier Heads for Guitar

We have collected for you the Hybrid Amplifier Heads for Guitar

Equipment list navigation:

  1. Vox MV 50 CR Rock
  2. DV Mark Raw Dawg 60 EG
  3. Vox MV 50 CL Clean
  4. Joyo Zombie II
  5. Joyo Meteor
  6. BluGuitar Amp1 Mercury Edition
  7. Vox MSB25 Mini Superbeetle
  8. Joyo Jackman II
  9. Orange Micro Terror
  10. Orange Micro Dark
  11. Vox MV 50 AC
  12. Joyo Bluejay
  13. Orange Terror Stamp
  14. BluGuitar Amp1 Iridium Edition
  15. Joyo Jackman
  16. Joyo Zombie
  17. Joyo Atomic
  18. Joyo Firebrand
  19. Vox MV 50 Boutique
  20. Laney IRT-SLS
  21. DV Mark Micro 60 CMT Head
  22. Orange Micro Terror Bundle
  23. BluGuitar Amp1 Mercury Edition Bundle

1. Vox MV 50 CR Rock

Vox MV 50 CR Rock

Amp Head for Electric Guitar

  • Analogue preamplifier with Nutube technology
  • Power: 50 W
  • Class D amplifier
  • Controls for gain EQ and volume
  • EQ switch on the back to adapt to speaker box
  • Line/Headphone jack with speaker simulation
  • Impedance select switch: 4, 8 or 16 Ohm
  • ECO mode switch
  • 1 Input for guitar
  • 1 Speaker output socket
  • VU meter as output level indicator
  • Robust carrying handle
  • Retro design
  • Weight: g
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): x 75 x mm
  • Incl. 19 V power supply

2. DV Mark Raw Dawg 60 EG

DV Mark Raw Dawg 60 EG

DV Mark Raw Dawg 60 EG Head, Eric Gales Signature Electric Guitar Head, power: 60 watts into 4 ohms, 50 watts into 8 ohms, MPT power amplifier (Mark Proprietary Technology), 1 channel, tube preamp: micro, tone control: level, bass, mid, high, on-board reverb control, FX LOOP send and return, footswitch connection for reverb on / off (footswitch not included), weight: 1,9 kg, dimensions (W x D x H): x x 70 mm


3. Vox MV 50 CL Clean

Vox MV 50 CL Clean

Amp Head for Electric Guitar

  • Analogue preamplifier with Nutube technology
  • Power: 50 W
  • Class D amplifier
  • Controls for treble, bass and volume
  • EQ switch on the back to adapt to speaker box
  • Damping switch for changing the output power in 3 stages switch position FULL 1/10 1/
  • Damping max. (0 dB) dB dB
  • Line/Headphone jack with speaker simulation
  • ECO mode switch
  • 1 Input for guitar
  • 1 Speaker output socket
  • VU meter as output level indicator
  • Robust carrying handle
  • Retro design
  • Weight: g
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): x 75 x mm
  • 19 V power supply unit included

4. Joyo Zombie II

Joyo Zombie II

Joyo Zombie II, Hybrid Amplifier Head for Electric Guitar; Bluetooth function can play music from external sources in addition to the guitar signal, defined high gain sound, Class D power amplifier; Channels: 2; Power: 20 watts; Pre-Amp Tubes: 12AX7; Controls: 2 x Gain, 2 x Tone, 2 x Volume; Switches: Clean/OD, Bluetooth; Effects: 0; Speaker Outputs: min. 8 Ohms (1/4&#; Jack); Connections: Input (1/4&#; Jack), FX Send & Return (2 x 1/4&#; Jack), Phones (1/8&#; TRS-Jack), Footswitch (1/4&#; Jack); Dimensions (W x D x H): x x mm; (6,42&#; x 5,51&#; x 4,33&#;); Weight: 1,3 kg (2,9 lbs); Included: Footswitch (1-way switch), power supply


5. Joyo Meteor

Joyo Meteor

Amp Head for Electric Guitar with Bluetooth

  • Addition to the guitar signal, Bluetooth feature can play music from external sources
  • 2 Channels: Clean and Overdrive
  • Sound characteristics: British mid-rich high-gain stack
  • Power: 20 W
  • Preamp with 12AX7 tube
  • Class D amplifier
  • Controls: Gain, tone and volume
  • Switch: Clean / OD &#; Bluetooth &#; Power
  • Serial FX Loop Send & Return 2x mm jack
  • Bluetooth on/off switch (for receiving Bluetooth signal)
  • Speaker output: 1x mm jack min. 8 Ohm
  • Headphone output via mm stereo mini jack
  • Dimensions: x x mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Colour: Yellow / Black
  • Power adapter included
  • Suitable gig bag: Article number (not included)

6. BluGuitar Amp1 Mercury Edition

BluGuitar Amp1 Mercury Edition

Hybrid Amplifier Head for Electric Guitar

  • Versatile, fully analogue amplifier in pedal format
  • 4 Channels
  • Power: Watts
  • Adjustable boost
  • 3 Integrated footswitches
  • Speaker simulation for recording applications
  • Novel nanotube tube amplifier
  • PowerSoak power reducer
  • Controls: Clean Volume, Overdrive Gain, Overdrive Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Reverb, Master
  • Switches: Clean / Overdrive, Boost, Reverb
  • Effects: Reverb
  • Speaker outputs: 16 Ohms & 8 ohms ( mm jack)
  • Effect grinding paths: Serial / Parallel
  • Input: mm Jack
  • FX Loop Send & Return: 2x mm Jack
  • Rec Out / Headphones: mm Stereo jack
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): x x 68 mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Matching footswitch: Article Nr. (not included)

7. Vox MSB25 Mini Superbeetle

Vox MSB25 Mini Superbeetle

Electric Guitar Amp Head & Cabinet

  • Power: 50 W RMS @ 4 ohms, 25 W RMS @ 8 ohms, W RMS @ 16 ohms
  • Effects: Digital Reverb &#; Nutube Tremolo
  • Tube: Nutube 6P1
  • Controls: Gain, Treble, Bass, Reverb, Tremolo, Volume
  • EQ Flat / Deep
  • Eco On / Off
  • Impedance selector 4/8/16 ohms
  • Equipped with: 1 x 10&#; Celestion Custom
  • Max. Cabinet power: 50 W RMS @ 8 ohms
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): x x mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Includes power supply (DC 19 V) and speaker cable

8. Joyo Jackman II

Joyo Jackman II

Joyo Jackman II, Hybrid Amplifier Head for Electric Guitar; Bluetooth function can play music from external sources in addition to the guitar signal, classic british full stack sound, Class D power amplifier; Channels: 2; Power: 20 watts; Pre-Amp Tubes: 12AX7; Controls: 2 x Gain, 2 x Tone, 2 x Volume; Switches: Clean/OD, Bluetooth; Effects: 0; Speaker Outputs: min. 8 Ohms (1/4&#; Jack); Connections: Input (1/4&#; Jack), FX Send & Return (2 x 1/4&#; Jack), Phones (1/8&#; TRS-Jack), Footswitch (1/4&#; Jack); Dimensions (W x D x H): x x mm; (6,42&#; x 5,51&#; x 4,33&#;); Weight: 1,3 kg (2,9 lbs); Included: Footswitch, power supply


9. Orange Micro Terror

Orange Micro Terror

Hybrid Electric Guitar Amp Head

Since the amps have returned with the original color scheme, they are rightly claiming their niche in the highly competitive amplifier market. Just as before, when countless sizes used these amps, Orange Amplifier builds distinctive sound for people who know exactly what they want.

  • Power 20 watts
  • 1 Channel
  • Controls volume, tone and gain
  • Precision tube: 1x ECC83
  • AUX input: mm jack
  • Speaker connection: 1x 8 Ohm
  • Dimensions: mm x mm x 92 mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Incl. 15 Volt DC power supply

Orange Micro Dark

Orange Micro Dark

Amp Head for Guitar

  • Power: 20 W
  • Preamp tubes: ECC83 / 12AX7
  • Controls: Gain, shape and volume
  • Speaker connector: 1x Ohm
  • Headphone jack with CabSim (speaker simulation)
  • FX loop
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): x x 95 mm
  • Weight: 1 kg
  • Incl. 15 V DC power supply

Vox MV 50 AC

Vox MV 50 AC

Amp Head for Electric Guitar

  • Analogue preamplifier with Nutube technology
  • Power: 50 W
  • Class D amplifier
  • Controls for gain EQ and volume
  • EQ switch on the back to adapt to speaker box
  • Line/Headphone jack with speaker simulation
  • Impedance selector switch 4, 8 or 16 Ohm
  • ECO mode switch
  • 1 Input for guitar
  • 1 Speaker output socket
  • VU meter as output level indicator
  • Robust carrying handle
  • Retro design
  • Weight: g
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): x 75 x mm
  • 19 V power supply included

Joyo Bluejay

Joyo Bluejay

Amp Head for Electric Guitar with Bluetooth

  • Addition to the guitar signal, Bluetooth feature can play music from external sources
  • 1 Channel
  • Sound characteristics: Classic clean US combo
  • Power: 20 W
  • Preamp with 12AX7 tube
  • Class D amplifier
  • Controls: Gain, tone and volume
  • Switch: Normal/Bright, Bluetooth, Power On/Off
  • Serial FX Loop Send & Return 2x mm jack
  • Bluetooth On/Off Switch (for receiving a Bluetooth signal)
  • Speaker output: 1x mm jack min. 8 Ohm
  • Headphone output via mm stereo mini jack
  • Dimensions: x x mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Colour: Blue/Black
  • Power adapter included
  • Suitable gig bag: Article number (not included)

Orange Terror Stamp

Orange Terror Stamp

Orange Terror Stamp; Tube Hybrid guitar amplifier, tube preamp; in pedal format; 20 W; 1 channel; two different volume settings; FX loop; 1 x ECC83/12AX7; 1 x 8 Ohms or 1 x 16 Ohms; headphone output; with cabinet simulation; dimensions (W x H x D) 13,5 x 6,1 x 9,9 cm; weight 0,4 kg; color white; power supply 15V/2ADC (included)


BluGuitar Amp1 Iridium Edition

BluGuitar Amp1 Iridium Edition


Joyo Jackman

Joyo Jackman

Electric Guitar Amp Head with Bluetooth

  • Bluetooth feature can play music from external sources in addition to the guitar signal
  • 2 Channels: clean and overdrive
  • Sound characteristics: well defined high-gain amplifier
  • Power: 20W
  • Preamp with 12AX7 tube
  • Class-D amplifier
  • Controls: Gain, Tone and Volume
  • Switch: Clean / OD &#; Bluetooth &#; Power
  • Serial FX Loop Send & Return 2 x mm jack
  • Bluetooth On / Off Switch (to receive a Bluetooth signal)
  • Speaker output: 1 x mm jack min. 8 ohms
  • Headphone output via mm stereo mini jack
  • Dimensions: x x mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Colour: Red / Black
  • Includes power supply
  • Suitable gig bag: Art (not included)

Joyo Zombie

Joyo Zombie

Electric Guitar Amp Head with Bluetooth

  • Bluetooth feature can play music from external sources in addition to the guitar signal
  • 2 Channels: clean and overdrive
  • Sound characteristics: well defined high-gain amplifier
  • Power: 20W
  • Preamp with 12AX7 tube
  • Class-D amplifier
  • Controls: Gain, Tone and Volume
  • Switch: Clean / OD &#; Bluetooth &#; Power
  • Serial FX Loop Send & Return 2 x mm jack
  • Bluetooth On / Off Switch (to receive a Bluetooth signal)
  • Speaker output: 1 x mm jack min. 8 ohms
  • Headphone output via mm stereo mini jack
  • Dimensions: x x mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Colour: Grey / Black
  • Includes power supply
  • Suitable Gigbag: Art (not included)

Joyo Atomic

Joyo Atomic

Amp head for electric guitar with Bluetooth

  • Bluetooth connectivity: connect any Bluetooth-enabled device and play music through the BantamP
  • 2 Channels: Clean and Overdrive
  • Sound characteristics: British Class-A combo
  • Power: 20 W
  • Preamp with a single 12AX7 tube
  • Class-D power amp
  • Controls: Gain, Tone and Volume
  • Switches: Clean / OD &#; Bluetooth &#; Power
  • Serial FX loop
  • Send & return
  • 2x mm jack
  • Bluetooth on / off switch (to receive a Bluetooth signal)
  • Speaker output: 1x mm jack, min. 8 ohm
  • Headphone output via mm stereo mini jack
  • Dimensions: x x mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Colour: Green / Black
  • Incl. power supply
  • Corresponding gig bag: Article Nr (not included)

Joyo Firebrand

Joyo Firebrand

Joyo Firebrand, Hybrid Amplifier Head for Electric Guitar; Bluetooth function can play music from an external source in addition to the guitar signal; Channels: 2; Power: 20 watts; Pre-Amp Tubes: 12AX7; Controls: Gain, Tone, Volume; Switches: Clean/OD, Bluetooth On/Off, Power On/Off; Speaker Outputs: 1/4&#; Jack (8 Ohms); Effect Loops: Series; Connections: Instrument Input (1/4&#; Jack), FX Send & Return (2 x 1/4&#; Jack), Headphone Out (Stereo 3,5 mm Jack), Input AC V 50/60Hz OUTPUT DC18V/A; Dimensions (W x D x H): x x mm; (6,42&#; x 4,33&#; x 5,51&#;); Weight: 1,2 kg (2,6 lbs), included: power supply, colour: orange/blue, gigbag optional (# )


Vox MV 50 Boutique

Vox MV 50 Boutique

Amplifier Head for Electric Guitar

  • Analogue preamplifier with Nutube technology
  • Power: 50 watts
  • Class D power amplifier
  • Gain EQ and volume controls
  • EQ switch provides sound that&#;s the perfect match for the size of the cabinet being used
  • Line / headphone jack with cabinet simulation
  • Impedance selector 4, 8 or 16 ohms
  • ECO mode switch
  • 1 x Input for guitar
  • 1 x Speaker output
  • Stylish VU meter for output level
  • Robust carrying handle
  • Retro design
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): x 75 x mm
  • Weight: g
  • Includes 19 volt power supply

Laney IRT-SLS

Laney IRT-SLS

Hybrid Amplifier Head for Electric Guitar

  • 3 Channels (Clean, Rhythm and Lead)
  • Power: W
  • 2 Power Modes: High Power &#; W and Standard Power &#; W
  • Preamp tubes: 2 x ECC83
  • Controls: Pre-Boost, Clean Volume, Rhythm Gain, Lead Gain, Bass Pull Shift, Middle Pull Shift, Treble Pull Shift, Volume, Master Tone, Master Reverb and Variwatts
  • Switch: On / Off
  • Effects: Reverb
  • Serial FX loop
  • Connections: Input ( mm jack), Speaker Output (Twist Lock and mm jack combo), FX Loop Send and Return (2 x mm jack), Footswitch Input (5 pin DIN)
  • Speaker outputs: 4 &#; 16 ohms ( mm jack)
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): x x 70 mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Includes FS4 footswitch

DV Mark Micro 60 CMT Head

DV Mark Micro 60 CMT Head

DV Mark Micro 60 CMT Head Ciro Manna Signature, electric guitar head, 60W @ 8ohms / 50W @ 4ohms, Tube Preamp: Micro, MPT (Mark Proprietary Technology) power amp, 2 channels (clean/lead), controls (clean channel): level, bass, mid & high, controls (lead channel): level, drive, bass & high, On-Board reverb control, FX LOOP (send/return), 2x 6,3mm jack speaker outputs (4 ohms minimum Ioad), aux in, headphone out, dual voltage selector V/V, footswitch connector for channel switch (not included), optional DV MARK Bag XS (not included), dimensions (w x h x d): 20 x 6,4 x 22,1cm, weight: 1,9kg


Orange Micro Terror Bundle

Orange Micro Terror Bundle

Bundle offer comprising

Orange Micro Terror

  • Hybrid Electric Guitar Amp Head

Since the amps have returned with the original color scheme, they are rightly claiming their niche in the highly competitive amplifier market. Just as before, when countless sizes used these amps, Orange Amplifier builds distinctive sound for people who know exactly what they want.

  • Power 20 watts
  • 1 Channel
  • Controls volume, tone and gain
  • Precision tube: 1x ECC83
  • AUX input: mm jack
  • Speaker connection: 1x 8 Ohm
  • Dimensions: mm x mm x 92 mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Incl. 15 Volt DC power supply

Orange PPC

  • Guitar Cabinet
  • Speaker: Voice of the World 8&#;
  • Power handling: 20 W
  • Impedance: 8 Ohm
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): x x mm
  • Weight: 4 kg
  • Colour: Orange

Harley Benton GC 3 PP

  • Guitar Cable Jack &#; Jack
  • Length: 3 m
  • Amphenol

the sssnake PPS

  • The sssnake PPS
  • m Speaker cable, 2 x mm² cross section
  • mm Jack &#; mm Jack
  • Suitable for passive speakers &#; not for active speakers

BluGuitar Amp1 Mercury Edition Bundle

BluGuitar Amp1 Mercury Edition Bundle

Bundle offer comprising

BluGuitar Amp1 Mercury Edition

  • Hybrid Amplifier Head for Electric Guitar
  • Versatile, fully analogue amplifier in pedal format
  • 4 Channels
  • Power: Watts
  • Adjustable boost
  • 3 Integrated footswitches
  • Speaker simulation for recording applications
  • Novel nanotube tube amplifier
  • PowerSoak power reducer
  • Controls: Clean Volume, Overdrive Gain, Overdrive Master, Bass, Middle, Treble, Reverb, Master
  • Switches: Clean / Overdrive, Boost, Reverb
  • Effects: Reverb
  • Speaker outputs: 16 Ohms & 8 ohms ( mm jack)
  • Effect grinding paths: Serial / Parallel
  • Input: mm Jack
  • FX Loop Send & Return: 2x mm Jack
  • Rec Out / Headphones: mm Stereo jack
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): x x 68 mm
  • Weight: kg
  • Matching footswitch: Article Nr. (not included)

BluGuitar BluBox VSC

  • Professional Impulse Response Speaker Simulation in DI Box Shape
  • With a virtual collection of the most popular loudspeakers in the history of music
  • First-class sounding solution for the direct connection of any guitar amplifier to a PA or a recording console thanks to state-of-the-art convolution technology
  • 16 Cabinet models
  • Switch: Mic, Position, Ground Lift and Input Sensitivity
  • Connectors: Line In, Line Out, Speaker In, SpeakerThru (each jack), XLR Mic, XLR Mic, Out
  • Bit converter
  • Minimum latency of only 1 ms
  • Power consumption: mA
  • Power supply via 9 V DC power supply (coaxial connection &#; negative pole inside, not included)
  • Dimensions: x 95 x 38 mm
  • Weight: g

Cordial CTI 6 PR-BK

  • Professional Instrument Cable
  • Length: 6 m
  • Jack/Angled jack
  • Neutrik connector
  • Colour: Black

Write your review and rate this rating The Best 23 Hybrid Amplifier Heads for Guitar

Sours: https://soundsmag.com/top-hybrid-amplifier-heads-for-guitar/
mini hybrid guitar amp + orangebox distortion

Now to work, now from work, now to one client, now to another. So her ass was tucked up. And yet, Lilya is a brunette. I admired her and began to stir in my pants.

Amp hybrid guitar

To our secretary Zhenya. Briefly about her. shy. The girl is very neat and tidy, always collected and very beautiful.

Orange Micro Dark: 20W Hybrid Amp

Nope, your friend will devour me if I let her into the house. I said and turned around to return to my little joys. Little rubbish, how did she get it with her blackmail. Our mother was quite religious and would have devoured my brain if she knew about tattoos.

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The hand involuntarily began to walk over my body, then gently running its fingers over my stomach, going down, then desperately squeezing my chest. A wave of excitement rolled over with such force that I myself was surprised why I was so turned on. Maybe from the upcoming stormy night. I squatted down, pushed aside a strip of panties and moistened two fingers in my mouth.



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