Chainsaw links

Chainsaw links DEFAULT

How to Take a Link Out of a Chainsaw Blade

By Amie Taylor

Damaged links require immediate removal to prevent chain saw malfunction.

While a chain saw is a handy tool for taking down a dead tree, cutting up firewood or removing heavy fallen branches, it can also be dangerous to use when the chain is too long or too loose. Fortunately, you can remove a link yourself to adjust the chain to its proper length and tension.

Ensure that the chain saw is cool and not hot from recent use before commencing chain link removal. Remove the spark plug wire from the spark plug to ensure that the chain saw has no power to it.

Locate the master link that most manufacturers install to make removal of the chain a simple process. A visual inspection of the chain will reveal the master link due to its appearance that makes it stand out slightly from the other links.

Pop the master link open and remove the link to which it was connected. Apply pressure to the link by pressing it toward the link next to it with pliers to pop it free. Attach the master link to the link that was attached to the one that was removed and snap it closed.

Pop a link out of the chain with a chain-breaking tool when there's no master link on the chain. Align the hole in one of the links of the chain with the punch that presses the rivet out of the middle of the link and the flat base of the tool. Push down on the handle to apply pressure to the rivet until it pops out and releases the link. Snap the remaining links back together securely.

Test the tension of the chain after reassembly by holding the chain saw in one hand, and tugging and quickly releasing the chain with two fingers of the other hand along the top center of the guide bar. Ensure that the chain snaps back into place quickly and doesn't sag or appear loose on the underside of the bar. If the chain is too loose, remove another link, reconnect the chain and repeat the test. Reconnect the spark plug after performing the test and before using the chain saw.

References

Tips

  • Inspect the chain saw for broken or damaged parts, and loose nuts and screws before firing it up. Make any necessary repairs before use.

Warnings

  • Wear work gloves and safety goggles when removing a chain saw link to avoid cuts to your hands or eye damage from a flying link.

Writer Bio

Amie Taylor has been a writer since 2000. Book reviews, gardening and outdoor lawn equipment repair articles and short fiction account for a handful of her published works. Taylor gained her gardening and outdoor equipment repair experience from working in the landscaping and lawn-care business she and her husband own and operate.

Sours: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/out-chainsaw-blade-100396.html

Fit Guide

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  • 358.36148,
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  • 358.740180,
  • 41142,
  • 41443,
  • 41748,
  • 41952,
  • 41AY421S793,
  • 944.41443,
  • 944.41543,
  • 944.41801,
  • CMXGSAMCN4218,
  • CMXGSAMCX4218,
  • CMXGSAMY421S,
  • S185
  • 2Z753,
  • 2Z760,
  • 2Z970,
  • 4Z022,
  • 4Z023,
  • 4Z109,
  • 4Z573,
  • 6Z284,
  • 6Z823
  • ES-171,
  • ES-173,
  • PS-3300TH,
  • PS-34,
  • PS-340,
  • PS-341,
  • PS-3410TH,
  • PS-3410TH TLC,
  • PS-3410THC,
  • PS-350,
  • PS-400,
  • PS-401,
  • PS-420,
  • PS-45
  • CS-280,
  • CS-290,
  • CS-300,
  • CS-3000,
  • CS-301,
  • CS-302,
  • CS-303T,
  • CS-310,
  • CS-315,
  • CS-330,
  • CS-330MX4,
  • CS-330T,
  • CS-340,
  • CS-3400,
  • CS-341,
  • CS-345,
  • CS-3450,
  • CS-346,
  • CS-351,
  • CS-3510,
  • CS-355T,
  • CS-360T,
  • CS-361P,
  • CS-370,
  • CS-370F,
  • CS-370T,
  • CS-400,
  • CS-400F,
  • ECS-2000,
  • ECS-3000
  • 2000002 80V,
  • 20332,
  • CS60L03,
  • CSC404,
  • GCS80420,
  • GCS80421,
  • GS180 2001902
  • 20,
  • 20AV,
  • 23,
  • 23AV,
  • 3300,
  • 3314,
  • 3316,
  • 3318,
  • 3350,
  • 3550,
  • 3800,
  • 3850,
  • I3350B,
  • PS33,
  • RANGER,
  • UT10514,
  • UT10516,
  • UT10517,
  • UT10530,
  • UT10530A,
  • UT10532,
  • UT10540,
  • UT10542,
  • UT10544,
  • UT10546,
  • UT10548,
  • UT10549,
  • UT10560,
  • UT10562,
  • UT10564,
  • UT10566,
  • UT10568,
  • UT10569,
  • UT10580,
  • UT10582,
  • UT10584,
  • UT10586,
  • UT10588,
  • UT10589,
  • UT10640,
  • UT10660,
  • UT10680,
  • UT10901,
  • UT10901A,
  • UT10918,
  • UT10926,
  • UT10947A,
  • UT10947D,
  • UT10947E,
  • UT10974A,
  • UT43100,
  • UT43103,
  • UT43120,
  • UT43122,
  • ZR10540,
  • ZR10560,
  • ZR10580,
  • ZR10901,
  • ZR10901A,
  • ZR10947,
  • ZR10947A,
  • ZR10947D,
  • ZR43100,
  • d3300,
  • d3350b,
  • d3850,
  • d3850b,
  • z3850
  • 120 MARK II,
  • 136,
  • 137,
  • 141,
  • 142,
  • 235E,
  • 240,
  • 240E,
  • 33,
  • 336,
  • 338XPT,
  • 339XP,
  • 36,
  • 38,
  • 41,
  • T540XP
  • 25EV,
  • 28,
  • 28V,
  • 30,
  • 30V,
  • 35EV,
  • 40V,
  • CS36,
  • CS36LE,
  • CS40,
  • CS40LE,
  • CS40V,
  • J3816
  • EA3500S,
  • EA3500SRDB,
  • EA3501S,
  • UC4550A,
  • UC4551A
  • CS 340,
  • CS 380,
  • EB 356,
  • EB 358,
  • EBC1840DK,
  • MC3516,
  • MC4218AV,
  • MCC1435A,
  • MCC1635A,
  • MCC1840B,
  • MS 354a,
  • MS 4016,
  • MS 4018,
  • MXC1840D,
  • MXC1840DK,
  • Mac Cat 438
  • 1220,
  • 1420,
  • 1425,
  • 1625,
  • 1630,
  • 180,
  • 1800,
  • 190,
  • 1900,
  • 1950,
  • 1975,
  • 200,
  • 2000,
  • 2025,
  • 205,
  • 2050,
  • 2055,
  • 2075,
  • 210,
  • 2150,
  • 2155,
  • 2160,
  • 2175,
  • 220,
  • 2200,
  • 221,
  • 222,
  • 225,
  • 2250,
  • 2300,
  • 235,
  • 2350,
  • 236,
  • 2375,
  • 240,
  • 2400,
  • 2450,
  • 250,
  • 2500,
  • 255,
  • 2550,
  • 2555,
  • 260,
  • 2600,
  • 262,
  • 3314 Woodshark,
  • 3416,
  • 3516,
  • 3516AVX,
  • 3816,
  • 400E,
  • 4018,
  • 4218,
  • 4218A,
  • 4218AVX,
  • 967607201,
  • E14E,
  • E16E,
  • ELECTRIC PRO 400E,
  • ES400,
  • Micro 25 XX Series,
  • Micro 25 XXV Series,
  • P3314,
  • P3816,
  • PATRIOT 1900,
  • PP4218AVX,
  • PPB4218,
  • PPR4218A,
  • PR4218,
  • S23,
  • S25,
  • Super Micro 25 XX Series,
  • Super Micro 25 XXV Series,
  • WILD THING,
  • Woodshark
  • 107624-01,
  • 107624-02,
  • 107625-01,
  • 107625-02,
  • 111174-01,
  • CLD3516AWB,
  • CLD4016W,
  • CLD4018AW,
  • CLD4018AWC,
  • EL-8,
  • LD3516AWB,
  • LD4016AW,
  • LD4018AW,
  • LD4018WC,
  • RM1632A,
  • RM1635W,
  • RM1640B,
  • RM1640W,
  • RM1645,
  • RM1840W,
  • RM4218
  • RY10532,
  • RY3818,
  • RY40580,
  • RY43006,
  • ZRRY10532
  • 100,
  • 110,
  • 120,
  • 140,
  • 150,
  • 160,
  • 326T,
  • 402s,
  • 90
  • TB3516CC Gas,
  • TB3518CC Gas,
  • TB4018
  • 10A Electric,
  • 11A Electric,
  • 13A Electric,
  • 9A Electric

Replacement Guide

Sours: https://www.oregonproducts.com/en/s62-advancecut-18-inch-chainsaw-chain%3B-fits-echo-cs-400-and-cs-370%2C-poulan-2150-and-4180%2C-more%3B-3-8-in-low-profile-pitch%2C-050-in-gauge%2C-62-drive-links/p/s62
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Wrap-up

The numbers stamped on your chainsaw chain have a meaning. There’s a lot of confusion about what chainsaw chain markings are for, and in this post we’re going to help you clear things up. 

First, we’ll answer what the numbers are for generally, and then we’ll get into specific definitions from some of the most popular chain brands.

So, what do the numbers on a chainsaw chain mean? 

The numbers stamped on a chainsaw chain are an ID code used by the manufacturer to indicate the pitch and gauge measurements of the chain. Pitch and gauge are important dimensions which influence whether or not a chain is compatible with a chainsaw.

That’s the general answer, but we can get much more specific. Below, we’ve included two charts  that show the values for leading chain brands, and we’ll also further define pitch and gauge.

Chain Markings (Oregon, Husqvarna, Carlton)

In this section, there is a chart that shows the gauge and pitch ratings that correspond to chain markings used by 3 of the most popular chain brands: Oregon, Husqvarna, and Carlton. If you have a Stihl chain, check the second table below. Stihl uses a combination of 2 chain numbers.

Both of these tables contain data that was originally posted by Sahanpuru, and we’ve reformatted things to make it a bit easier to read. The tables are sortable, so feel free to use that feature to find your chain. Using the “CTRL + F” search box is also a good way to search this page.

Chain MarkingBrandGaugePitch
A1Carlton.050″3/8″
A2 Carlton .058″3/8″
A3Carlton.063″3/8″
B1Carlton.050″.404″
B2Carlton.058″.404″
B3Carlton.063″.404″
E1Carlton.050″1/4″
K1Carlton.050″.325″
K2Carlton.058″ .325″
K3Carlton.063″.325″
N1CCarlton.050″3/8″ Low Profile
N4Carlton.043″3/8″ Low Profile
H21Husqvarna.058″.325″
H22Husqvarna.050″.325″
H23Husqvarna.050″.325″
H25Husqvarna.058″.325″
H26Husqvarna.063″.325″
H30Husqvarna.050″.325″
H35Husqvarna.050″3/8″ Low Profile
H36Husqvarna.050″3/8″ Low Profile
H42Husqvarna.058″3/8″
H45Husqvarna.063″3/8″
H46Husqvarna.063″3/8″
H47Husqvarna.063″3/8″
H57Husqvarna.063″.404″
H58Husqvarna.058″3/8″
H64Husqvarna.063″.404″
H80Husqvarna.050″3/8″
H82Husqvarna.050″3/8″
H83Husqvarna.050″3/8″ Low Profile
16Oregon.063″.404″
18Oregon.080″.404″
20Oregon.050″.325″
22Oregon.063″.325″
25Oregon.050″1/4″
26Oregon.058″.404″
27Oregon.063″.404″
28Oregon.050″.404″
33Oregon.050″.325″
34Oregon.058″.325″
35Oregon.063″.325″
50Oregon.050″.404″
51Oregon.058″.404″
52Oregon.063″.404″
58Oregon.058″.404″
59Oregon.063″.404″
68Oregon.063″.404″
72Oregon.050″3/8″
73Oregon.058″3/8″
75Oregon.063″3/8″
90Oregon.043″3/8″ Low Profile
91Oregon.050″3/8″ Low Profile

Chain Markings (Stihl)

Okay, if you have a Stihl chain, you’ll want to use the below table. Stihl uses a slightly different approach for their chain numbers compared to the other manufacturers above.

Instead of using a single chain marking, Stihl uses a combination of 2 numbers. One of these numbers is stamped into the drive link (just like the other manufacturers), and Stihl stamps an additional number into the tooth link. 

For more information on where chain markings are stamped, jump to this section below. Now here’s the table details for Stihl chain numbers:

Drive Link
Marking
Tooth Link
Marking
BrandGaugePitch
11Stihl.043″1/4″
13Stihl.050″1/4″
32Stihl.050″.325″
52Stihl.058″.325″
62Stihl.063″.325″
33 Stihl .050″3/8″
53Stihl.058″3/8″
63Stihl.063″3/8″
1 6 Stihl.043″3/8″ Low Profile
36Stihl.050″3/8″ Low Profile
34Stihl.050″.404″
54Stihl.058″.404″
64Stihl.063″.404″

Where to Find Chain Markings

If your head is spinning from all the numbers, and you don’t know where to find these chain markings yet, don’t worry. We’ve got you covered. The exact location can vary slightly depending on the manufacturer, but generally it’s going to be on the drive link. 

And for Stihl chain’s, these markings show up on both the drive links and tooth links of a chain. Check-out the image below to see an example:

What do the numbers on a chainsaw chain mean

This chain is well used, so it’s a little tough to read the stamped text. However, you should be able to see the following:

  1. The number “6” on the drive link
  2. The “Stihl” brand name on the tooth link
  3. The number “2” on the tooth link

As you can see, this is a Stihl chain, which makes for a great example because you can see where the marking is on the drive link and on the tooth link. 

Most manufacturers will have a number on the drive link and the brand name (items 1 and 2 above). Stihl is the exception, because they also use a number on the tooth link (item 3 above). 

Using the chain numbers from this example, we can refer to our table of values, and learn that this chain has the following gauge and pitch:

  • Gauge = .063″
  • Pitch = .325″

If you can’t find the chain numbers or are having trouble reading them, there are two other ways you can measure your chain. We have those described in our other article here.

In the next section, we’ll define exactly what these numbers mean. We’ll also cover drive link count, which is another important measure you’ll need to know for your chain.

What is Gauge and Pitch?

1. Gauge

Gauge is the measurement used to describe the width of a chainsaw chain’s drive links. The higher the gauge, the wider the links. It’s helpful to know this, because if you’re not sure about the gauge rating on a chain, you can check it easily by measuring the width of the drive link.

When you’re choosing a chainsaw chain, getting the correct gauge is critical, because that will determine if you have a proper fit with your chainsaw’s bar groove. See below:

Chainsaw gauge numbers

A chain’s drive links are the part of the chain that slide around the bar groove, allowing the chain to cling to the body of the chainsaw. If your chain’s drive links have the wrong gauge, they will either be too big or too small for the bar groove.

When the gauge is too small, you run the risk of throwing your chain, which can be quite dangerous. You would also have a hard time keeping the chain in place, and may not be able to finish a cut at all. When the gauge is too big, it won’t fit into the bar groove in the first place.

For a chain to be compatible with your chainsaw, it has to match the gauge rating of your chainsaw’s bar. You can learn the 4 measurements relevant to a chainsaw bar in this post.

2. Pitch

Technically speaking, the pitch is calculated as the distance between 3 rivets, divided by 2. In essence, this is a measure of the distance between your chain’s links. Since it’s a little more complicated to measure the pitch manually, I prefer to get it elsewhere. 

You can find the chain pitch using the chain markings and our tables above. It’s also typically printed on the packaging (for new chains) so sometimes you can get it there. 

When looking for compatible chains, you can find the pitch you need for your chainsaw, by looking at a the information stamped on the side of the chainsaw bar. If you’re not sure where to look for that, you can learn all about it in our post about chainsaw bar measurements.

3. Drive Link Count

In order to have the complete set of chain measurements, you’re also going to need one other piece of information: how long the chain should be. The length of chainsaw chains are not measured in inches or CM. Instead, chains are measured by the number of links. 

For example, instead of saying a chain is 14 inches long, it would say something like “60 links”. If you have a chain already, it’s easy to determine the number of links, just count them! This goes by drive links, by the way, so make sure those are the links you’re counting. 

Similar to gauge and pitch, the number of links will also influence whether the chain is compatible with your chainsaw. You can find the link count that is compatible with your chainsaw, stamped into the side of the chainsaw bar. 

How to Change a Chainsaw Chain

Once you’ve identified your chain, you may be ready to install it on your chainsaw. We’ve written an in-depth article on how to replace a chainsaw chain, check it out to learn the steps. For now, here’s a brief summary of what you’ll need to do next:

  1. Grab a scrench and a gauge tool
  2. Remove the front panel
  3. Pull the bar off
  4. Remove the old chain (if there is one)
  5. Inspect and clean the bar
  6. Clean around the sprocket
  7. Re-assemble the bar and chain
  8. Screw the panel back on
  9. Tighten the chain
  10. Test chain tension

If you’ve changed a chain before, then this could be a helpful checklist. If it’ll be your first time changing a chain, go ahead and jump to our in-depth guide, which includes step-by-step photos that will make things much easier for you to follow.

There you have it. We’ve covered the numbers on chainsaw chains, what they mean, where to find them, and more.  

I hope that you’ve found the answer you were looking for, and if you did find this post helpful, please share it with a friend or on social media. We’re always excited to help more people, and to get the word out about BurlyBeaver.com.

I hope you have a marvelous day (or evening), and we’ll see you next time. 

Now go do something awesome!

Sours: https://burlybeaver.com/chainsaw-chain-numbers/
Chainsaws \u0026 Tools : How to Shorten the Chain on a Chainsaw
Black and DeckerNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksDN400, DN401, DN402, DN404, DN412, DN416, 8308, 8310, 8312, 8314, GK110, GK320 

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

44

49

54

DaytonNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links2Z753, 2Z760, 2Z970, 4Z022,
4Z023, 4Z109,
4Z573, 6Z284,
6Z823

 

10"

12"

14"

16"

18"

3/8" Picco®, 3/8" .050"

40

45

52

56

62

2Z462, 2Z462A,
2Z561, 2Z971,
4Z251, 4Z251A,
4Z252, 4Z397,
6Z826, 7Z627

 

16"

17"

18"

20"

21"

24"

3/8" .050"

60

61

66

70

72

81

Dolmar/SachsNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 108, 200, 201, 260, 275, 285, 295, Hobby PS340, PS400 

12"

14"

16"

18"

3/8" Picco®

45

52

56

62

100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 108, 200, 201, 260, 275, 285, 295, Hobby PS340, PS400 

16"

3/8" .050"

56

109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120 

16"

18"

20"

3/8" .050"

59

64

69

109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120Chain length for 16" may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

16"

18"

20"

3/8" .058"

59/60

64

69

109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120 

18"

20"

.325" .058"

66

72

EchoNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links280E/EG/EVL, 285EVL, 290EVL, 301, 302, 304/VL, 320EVL, 330EVL, 351EVL, 360EVL, CS300EVL, 440EVL/EVLH, 4000, 4500, 4601 

12"

14"

16"

18"

3/8" Picco®

45

52

57

62

280E/EG/EVL, 285EVL, 290EVL, 301, 302, 304/VL, 320EVL, 330EVL, 351EVL, 360EVL, CS300EVL, 440EVL/EVLH, 4000, 4500, 4601 

16"

3/8" .050"

57

CS280, CS290, CS300, CS301, CS302  

1/4" .050"

 CS280, CS290, CS300, CS301, CS302, CS315, CS330, CS351, CS3000, CS3400, CS3450Chain length for 16" may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

10"

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

40

45

52

56/57

CS400, CS440, CS3900, CS4000, CS4400, CS4500, CS4600, CS5000 

16"

18"

20"

.325" .050"

66

72

78

CS60, CS451, CS452, CS500, CS501, CS510, CS550, CS601, CS602, CST610, CS650, CS660, CS701, CS702, CS706, CS750, CS6700, CS8000 

16"

18"

20"

24"

3/8" .050"

60

66

70

81

CS602, CS702   

.404"

  HomeliteNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksBandit, Classic 192, Little Red, LX30, Super 2, Super 2CC,
VI Super 2, XEL Electric, XEL-14,
XL, XL 2(after 5042001), XL2CC,
XL-10, XL-16,
180 Series, 190, 200, 240, 245(before XE339)Chain length may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

10"

12"

14"

16"


42

48

53

59

Bandit, Classic 192, Little Red, LX30, Super 2, Super 2CC,
VI Super 2, XEL Electric, XEL-14,
XL, XL 2(after 5042001), XL2CC,
XL-10, XL-16,
180 Series, 190, 200, 240, 245(before XE339)Chain length may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

16"

18"

20"

3/8" .050

59/60

64

70

EL12, EL14, EL16 

12"

14"

16"

3/8" .050"

45

50

56

110 (Electric)   

1/4" .050"

3/8" Picco®

  Big Red, EZ Series,
EZ 250(prior to 1989)
Mini SL, Super EZAO, V-15 Mini S6, XL 76,
XL 100 Series, 130,
150, 290, 340, 350

Chain length may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

16"

20"

3/8" .050"

59

70

CS40, CS50, 245, 250, 252, 290,
300 (after 1989)

Chain length may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

16"

18"

20"

.325" .050"

67

73

79

C Series, Super XL, SXL 922, SXL 923, SXL 925, VI 955,
XL 12, XL 15, XL 400, XL(700 Series), XL(800 Series), XL(900 Series), 330, 350, 360, 410, 450, 460, 550, 650

Chain length may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

16"

18"

20"

24"

3/8" .050"

60

66

70

81

PS33, 20AV, 23AV, 3300, 3350, 3800, 3850 

14"

16"

18"

3/8" .050"

52

56

62

25, 27, 4100, 4150, 4500, 4550 

16"

18"

20"

.325" .050"

66

72

78

HusqvarnaNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links34, 35, 37, 335Some models use 1/4" chain

14"

3/8" Picco®

50

A-65, 65L, A-77, 160, 163, 180S, 263, 280S, 380CD, 480 

14"

16"

3/8", .404"

52

56

Husky Jr. 121 

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

52

57

 

16"

3/8" .050"

57

EL 16, 23, 36, 41, 136, 141, 243(Models 36, 41, 136, 141 may take G66).

14"

16"

3/8" .050"

52

56

32 

14"

16"

3/8" .050"

53

58

33, 36, 38, 40, 41, 42, 44, 45, 49, 50, 51, 55, 57, 133, 140S, 154, 234, 238, 240, 242, 246, 254, 257, 340, 345, 346, 350, 351, 360, 440, 444, XP Rancher 50, EL1400, 1405 

16"

18"

20"

3/8" .050"

59

64

70

 

18"

3/8" .058"

64

 

16"

18"

.325" .058"

64

72

36, 40, 41, 45, 49, 51, 55, 136, 141, 340, 346, 351Use only with narrow-kerf design bar. (Models 36, 41, 136, 141 may take S52/S56).

16"

.325" .050"

66

Rancher, SS77, 61, 62, 65,  66, 77, 160, 162, 181, 185, 257, 260, 261, 262, 263, 266, 268, 272, 281, 285, 288, 365, 371, 380, 394, 480, 1100, 2100, 2101XP, 3120XP, 266XP 

16"

18"

20"

3/8" .050"

60

68

72

 

16"

18"

20"

24"

3/8" .058"

60

68

72

84

 

20"

3/8" .063"

72

John DeereNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links8, 9, 61, 81, 91Chain length may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

44

49

54

12, 15  

3/8" Picco®, 3/8 .050

 17, 19  

3/8" .050

 25EV, 28V, 30V, 35EV, 40VChain length may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

45

52

56/57

50AV, 51SV, 55V, 60V, 65, 66SV, 70V, 80EV 

16"

18"

20"

24"

3/8" .050"

60

66

70

81

45EV, 46EV, 450V 

16"

18"

20"

.325" .050"

66

72

78

JonseredNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links36, 361, 365, 370, 2014, 2016, 2036 

 

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

45

52

56

60, 61, 62, 66, 70, 75, 77, 80, 81, 90, 110, 111, 490, 601, 621, 751, 801, 820, 830, 910, 920, 939, 1020Chain length may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

16"

18"

20"

3/8" .050"

59/60

64

70

18"

3/8" .058"

64

16"

18"

.325" .058"

66

72

45, 49, 50, 51, 52, 370, 410, 420, 425, 435, 450, 451, 455, 510, 521, 535, 2050, 2051, 2054 

 

16"

18"

20"

.325" .058"

66

72

78

2036, 2040

Some models used 3/8" .050 chain

16"

.325 .050

66

2051, 2054, 450, 455, 510SP, 520, 525, 535  

.325" .050, .325" .058

 625, 630, 630 Super, 670, 2095  

3/8" .050, 3/8" .058

 MakitaNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksDCS 9000 

16"

24"

3/8" .058"

60

84

DCS 330S, DCS 340, DCS 341, DCS 390S, DCS 400, DCS 401 

14"

16"

3/8" .050"

52

56

5012B, 5014NB,
5016NB 

12"

14"

16"

3/8" .050"

45

54

58

DCS 520I,
DCS 5200I,
DCS 6800I,
DCS 9000 

18"

20"

21"

3/8" .050"

64

70

72

DCS 430,
DCS 431 

16"

18"

20"

.325" .050"

.325" .050"

.325" .050"

66

72

78

McCullochNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksPRO35, 40, Mini Macs PM 6, PM 12, PM series (155, 310, 320, 330, 340, 355, 360, 364, 370, 374, 375, 384, 470, 474, 480, 484, 494, 510, 515), Eager Beaver, Mini Mac (all Models), Mac 110, 115, 120, 130, 140, 160S, 400, 430, 435, 440, 445, 3200, 3210, 3214, 3216, 3514, 3516, 3518, 3816, 3818AV, McCat Super 6AV, 18AV, Silver Eagle 2010, 2012S, 2014S, 2016S, 2116AVS, 2316, 2318AVS, Titan 35,40, Wildcat/MacCat, Electramac 10ES, 12ES, 14ES, 16ES, 200-12, 250-12, 250-14, 300S-16, 450S-16, Silver Eagle, 250-14, 300S-16Chain length may vary. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

Some models used 1/4" chain.

10"

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

38/39

44/45

4950

54/55

MAC 4600,
4900 Series 

16"

18"

20"

.325" .050"

66

72

78

Mac (1-10, 2-10, 3-10, 4-10, 5-10, 6-10, 7-10, 10-10), CP55, CP70, CP70L, 10-10A, Pro 10-10A, Pro Mac (55, 60, 555, 570, 605, 610, 650, 655, 700, 800, 805, 850), Super Pro (60, 70, 80, 81,), Double Eagle 50, Double Eagle 80, Eager Beaver 3.4, 3.7, Titan 50, 57, Timber Bear, Silver Eagle 3420, 3720 

16"

18"

20"

24"

3/8" .050"

60

66

70

81

Olympic / Olem-MacNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links233, 234, 240, 241, 244, 335, 340, OM3200, 140EF, 930, 935, 940, 942, 945, 945, 950, 951 

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

44

50

56

233, 234, 240, 241, 244, 335, 340, OM3200, 140EF, 930, 935, 940, 942, 945, 945, 950, 951 

16"

18"

.325" .058"

66

72

930, 935, 940, 942, 945, 945, 950, 951 

16"

18"

20"

3/8" .050"

60

64

71

250/A/AS, 251, Super 251, 252, 254, 260, 261, 272, 280, 284, 355, 460, 461, 480, 481, 482 

16"

18"

20"

24"

3/8" .050"

60

66

70

81

PartnerNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksMini P, Mini PII, Mini PIII, Spartan (330, 350, 1601, 1602, 1610, 1611, 1612, 1613, 1614, 1616)Some models used 1/4" chain.

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

45

52

56

365 

14"

3/8" .050"

52

F50, F55, P50, P51, P55, P65, P70, P85, P100, R11, R12, R14, R16, R17, R18, R19, R20, R21, 22, R23, R30, R35, 40, R416, R420, R421, R435, R440, S50, S55, S65, 550, 650, 1655, 2055, 7000 

14"

16"

20"

3/8" .050"

60

72

P360, P400, P450, P500, P5000 

16"

.325" .050"

66

PioneerNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksP10, P11, P12Chain length may vary. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

Some models used 1/4" chain

14"

3/8" Picco®

50

P20, P21, P25, P26, P28, P970, P1072, P1073, P1074 

16"

.325" .058"

69

P11, P20, P25,
P285, P970, P1072, P1073 

16"

20"

3/8" .050"

60

72

P38, P39, P40, P41, P42, P45, P50, P51, P52, P55, P60, P61, P62, 515 Farmsaw, Farmlite 

16"

20"

3/8" .058"

60

72

PoulanNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksE14E, E16E, Micro 25 (XX Series, XXV Series), Super Micro 25 (XX Series, XXV Series), Wildthing, S23, S25, 180, 190, 200, 205, 225, 235, 240, 255, 260, 1220, 1420, 1425, 1625, 1800, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075, 2150, 2175, 2250, 2300, 2350, 2375, 2400, 2450, 2500, 2550, 2600, 2700, 2800, 3000, 3300, 255, 295, EL14 

10"

12"

14"

16"

18"

3/8" Picco®

40

45

52

56

62

285, 295, 305, 306SA, 310, 335, 336, 2700, 2750, 2800, 2900, 3000, 3050, 3100, 3300 

16"

18"

20"

.325" .050"

66

72

78

203, 245, 306, 360, 361, 375, 395, 400, 450, 3400, 3500, 3600, 3700, 3800, 3900, 4000, 4200, 4400, 4900, 5200, 5400, 5500, 6700, 6900, 7700, 8500 

16"

17"

18"

20"

24"

3/8" .050"

60

61

66

70

81

405, 415, 425, 445,
455, 475, 505 

16"

20"

3/8" .050"

3/8" .050"

60

72

365, 380, 3350, 3450, 3500, 3600, 3650, 3750 

20"

22"

3/8" .050"

70

76

Poulan Pro S25, 205, 225, 285, 305, 335 

12"

14"

16"

18"

3/8" Picco®

45

52

56

62

Poulan Pro 325 

16"

18"

.325" .058"

66

72

Poulan Pro 405, 455, 525, 655 

16"

18"

3/8" .050"

60

72

Red MaxNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksG300 

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

45

52

56

RemingtonNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksJob Master, Mighty Mite (100-500, Weekender), Yardmaster, Jobmaster, Sportsman, Outdoorsman, Outdoorsman II, Rancher, 812, 814, 816, 840, 850, 860Chain length may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

Models with chain brakes use 3/8" low profile chain.

10"

12"

14"

16"

3/8" .050

40

45

49/50

56

Electric EL-1, EL-6, EL-7, Limb ‘N’ Trim, 8-14, 75475, 75481, 75762, 76728, 098031, 99178, 100015, 100089-05 

10"

12"

14"

15"

16"

3/8" .050"

40

45

50

53

56

Logger, PL-4, PL-5, PL-5A, PL-55, PL-55A
SL-4 Automatic, SL-9, SL-9 Automatic, SL-10, SL-11A, SL-14, SL-16, Woodsman 

16"

18"

20"

21"

24"

3/8" .050"

60

66

70

72

81

Pole Saw #104317                     

8"

3/8" .043"

34

Sears / CraftsmanNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links35201

360 model number prefix

20"

.325" .050"

78

3412, 3425, 3455, 3476, 34101, 34102, 34106, 34109, 34111, 34114, 34124, 34181, 35006, 35008, 35018, 35093, 35104, 35106, 35108, 35114, 35116, 35118, 35119, 35120, 35134, 35136, 35138, 35144, 35156, 35158, 35198, 35201, 35202, 35203, 35205, 35206, 35207, 35216, 35231, 35235, 35263, 35266, 35267, 35363, 35366, 35367, 35504, 35505, 35506, 35508, 35512, 35514, 35516, 35624, 35718, 35723, 35736, 35802358 model number prefix

10"

12"

14"

16"

18"

3/8" Picco®

40

45

52

56

62

35094, 35211358 model number prefix

Chain length for 14" may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

14"

3/8" Picco®

52/53

35232, 35238, 35886358 model number prefix

Chain length for 14" may vary depending on make of bar. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

16"

3/8" Picco®

56/57

35119, 35607, 35624.2, 35628358 model number prefix

18"

.325" .050"

72

35238, 35618, 35623358 model number prefix

18"

3/8" Picco®

62

35212, 35483, 35608, 35609, 35690, 35885, 35887, 35889358 model number prefix

16"

18"

20"

24"

3/8" .050"

59

66

70

81

35120, 35492, 35633358 model number prefix

20"

.325" .050"

78

3400, 3401, 3402, 3445, 3455315 model number prefix

10"

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

40

45

52

56

3411, 3460, 3461, 34071315 model number prefix

12"

14"

3/8" Picco®

48

52

3408, 3465, 3466, 3417*

315 model number prefix

*Caution: The  self-sharpening unit must be removed from the 3417 saw or serious injury could result.

14"

3/8" Picco®

53

35251, 35255917 model number prefix

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

53

57

35138, 35147, 35148, 35177, 35178, 35187, 35197, 35371, 35375

917 model number prefix

Caution: The  self-sharpening unit must be removed from the saw or serious injury could result.

17"

.325" .050"

71

35372, 35376

917 model number prefix

Caution: The  self-sharpening unit must be removed from the saw or serious injury could result.

18"

.325" .050"

74

35373, 35377

917 model number prefix

Caution: The  self-sharpening unit must be removed from the saw or serious injury could result.

18"

.325" .050"

74

ShindaiwaNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links90, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 107, 110, 113, 117, 120, 140, 150, 160, 180, 300, 305, 340, 345, 346 350, 355, 360, 415, 416, 420, 440, 450, 451, 480, 500, 510, 560Chain length may vary Count drive lugs on existing chain.

10"

12"

14"

16"

18"

3/8" Picco®

40

45

52/53

56/57/58

62

 

16"

3/8" .050"

56

 

16"

.325 .050"

59

575, 580, 680, 685, 695, 757 

16"

18"

20"

3/8" .050"

60

68

72

575, 580, 680, 685, 695, 757 

16"

18"

20"

24"

3/8" .058"

60

68

72

84

575, 580, 680, 685, 695, 757 

20"

3/8" .063"

72

377, 405, 406, 407, 410, 415, 416, 440, 450, 451, 480, 485, 488, 500 

16"

18"

20"

.325" .050"

66

72

78

SkilNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links1601, 1602, 1610 (Types 1, 2 & 3),
1611 (Type 1), 1612, 1613, 1614 (Types 1 & 2), 1616 (Types 1, 2 & 3), 1700, 1705 (Types 1, 2 &3)Chain length may vary Count drive lugs on existing chain.

Some models used 1/4" chain.

10"

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

40

45

52

56

1620, 1622, 1624, 1634, 1636

Chain length may vary. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

10"

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

40

45

52

57

605, 606 Electric

Chain length may vary. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

52

58

1641

Chain length may vary. Count drive lugs on existing chain.

16"

18"

20"

24"

3/8" .050"

60

66

70

81

SoloNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links600, 603, 605, 606, 631, 632, 638, 662, 670, 680, 690 

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

53

58

634, 639, 641, 644, 645, 647, 651, 654 

16"

18"

20"

.325" .050"

67

73

79

StihlNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksE10, E14, 009, 010, 011, 012, 015, 018, 019, 020, 020T, 021, 023, 023CSome Stihl models may come equipped with 3/8"-.043" gauge chain (Picco® Narrow).

Some models may use 1/4" chain.

12"

14"

16"

18"

3/8" Picco®

44

50

55

61

017, 019T, 021, 023L, HT75, E140 

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco® Narrow (.043)

44

50

55

023, 025 

16"

18"

.325" .063"

62

68

026, 026 Pro, 029 

16"

18"

20"

.325" .063"

67

74

81

024, 026, 028, 029, 030, 031, 032, 034, 036, 036 Pro, 036QS, 038, 039, 040, 041, 042, 044, 045, 048, 056, 064, 066, E15, E20 

16"

18"

20"

24"

28"

3/8" .050

60

66

72

84

91

044 Pro, 046M 

18"

20"

25"

28"

3/8" .050

66

72

84

91

044 Pro, 046M 

18"

20"

25"

30"

3/8" .063

66

72

85

97

066M 

20"

25"

28"

32"

36"

3/8" .050

72

85

92

106

115

066M 

20"

25"

30"

36"

3/8" .063

72

85

97

115

088M 

21"

3/8" .063

72

088M 

25"

30"

33"

36"

41"

47"

.404 .063

80

91

99

108

123

138

TAS / TanakaNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksECS290, ECS300, ECS320, ECS330, ECS650, ECS355, ECS405, ECS3500, ECS360, ECS370 

12"

14"

16"

18"

3/8" Picco®

45

52

57

62

 

16"

3/8" .050

56

 

16"

.325 .050

59

ToroNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links51100, 51140 

10"

12"

14"

3/8" Picco®

40

45

52

WenNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive Links1100(Type 1), 1200(Type 1), 1400(Type 1) 

10"

12"

14"

3/8" Picco®

41

49

54

Bumble Bee, Hornet, Wasp, 1100, 1200, 1400, 2000, 2400, 2600, 2700, 5000, 5008, 5010, 5014, 5016 

10"

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

41

49

53

58

Lumberjack, 6014, 6016 

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

49

55

Western AutoNotesBar LengthReplacement Chain SizeNumber of Drive LinksAV14 (Electric), AV16 (Electric), CAT 17 (Electric), WIZ: 010, 012, 014, 110, 112, 212, 214, 316, 525 DA, 1800, 2000 

10"

12"

14"

16"

3/8" Picco®

40

45

52

57

B013, WIZARD AV18, 430, 3400 

16"

18"

20"

3/8" .050"

60

66

70

Sours: https://www.planopower.com/how-to-determine-size-of-replacement-saw-chain

Links chainsaw

Chainsaw Chain Measurements, Sizes, and Types

Chainsaw chains are available in almost limitless combinations of sizes, types, and features. This is because chainsaws themselves also vary greatly in size and application.


When it's time to replace a chain, it is especially important to have all the right information regarding the chainsaw and its chain size. Matching the right chain to a chainsaw is easy if you have the right measurements, however, matching the right chain to a chainsaw is a little more complicated than finding other power tool accessories, because of the unique way that chainsaw chains are measured. The information below explains exactly how chainsaw chains are measured, the difference between these measurements, and how to quickly find the measurement numbers needed to order the correct chain.After matching the right size of chain there is still a host of chainsaw chain types and features to choose from and match to the application, but that's usually much more straight-forward than finding measurements. Finally, this article also provides step-by-step search instructions for finding the correct chainsaw chain on eReplacementParts.com. Our search filtering features make finding the right chain extremely easy when customers have the necessary measurement numbers. But first, let's talk about the three measurements that are absolutely necessary for matching chainsaw chains.   The 3 Necessary Chainsaw Chain NumbersThere are three measurements that every chainsaw user must know ahead of time to match the right size chainsaw chain to their chainsaw:

1. Pitch

2. Gauge, and

3. the numberof drive links (yes, they must be counted)The following is a complete explanation of how these qualities are measured on chainsaw chains, what the most common measurements are, how to find these measurements, and how to measure them when they cannot be found.   1. Pitch MeasurementThe pitch of a chainsaw chain is a measurement that describes how close together links are on the chain. It does not tell you how many links are present, or what the overall length of the chain is.

Pitch = the distance between any 3 rivets on the chain, divided by half. (see picture below)

Pitch Measurement
  Yes, that's kind of a complicated measurement, but luckily, most chainsaws display this measurement somewhere on the tool or in the user manual. Chainsaw chains are available in the following pitch sizes, measured in inches:

1/4", .325", 3/8", 3/8" low-profile, and .404". 3/8" pitch chains are the most common pitch size, and 3/8" low-profile pitch chains are even more common than regular 3/8" chains.3/8" low-profile chains displace a smaller amount of the material being cut, because their "kerf" (the width of material removed in cutting) is more narrow, reducing the power needed for cutting. 3/8" low-profile chains typically fit chainsaws whose guide bars are 18" or shorter in length, which are the majority of medium-use, non-professional application chainsaws such as a homeowner might own..404" pitch chains are normally for larger, professional-grade chainsaws often used by the likes of firemen and rescue workers. The greater distance between links makes for more aggressive cutting.When a chainsaw chain's pitch measurement is displayed on the tool, it is usually on the guide bar, towards the user-end of the tool. Sometimes the measurement is displayed very clearly, and sometimes it is mixed in with a bunch of other numbers, so you have to know what to look for.When a pitch number can't be found on the tool or in the user manual, pitch can be measured, but because a high level of accuracy is needed to tell the difference between .325" and 3/8", for example, it is often a better idea to take the saw to a shop to be measured.If you decide to measure the pitch yourself, just remember to measure between the middle points of 3 rivets on the chain, and then divide the number by 2. So, for a 3/8" pitch chain, the measurement between three links would be 3/4" (.75"), which is 3/8" (.375") when divided by 2.[Back to top]   2.Gauge MeasurementThe parts of chainsaw chains that fit into the saw's guide bar are called the drive links. The drive link is the bottom part of the chainsaw chain (see picture below).

Drive Links
Gauge measures the thickness of the drive links if you were to look at them along the length of the chain.

Gauge Measurement
Obviously, it is important to match the right chain gauge to the saw so that the chain will fit into the guide bar correctly. Chainsaw chains are available in the following gauge measurements, also measured in inches:

.043", .050", .058", and .063". .050" is the most common gauge. Like the pitch measurement, the gauge measurement is often displayed on the chainsaw, usually towards the user-end of the guide bar. Also like the pitch measurement, the gauge measurement can either be displayed clearly or jumbled in with a bunch of other numbers, so it's important to have an idea of what kind of numbers to look for.Because gauge measurements are so small, it is not recommended that users measure gauge themselves if the measurement can't be found on the tool or in the user manual. However, if a pair of accurate calipers are available, measuring gauge is a cinch. Without calipers, we recommend taking the saw to a shop to have the chain gauge measured (some toolmen are so familiar with these chains that they will be able to identify its measurements by sight).[Back to top]   3.Number of Drive LinksTo get the right chainsaw chain, the number of drive links on the chain must be counted if the count is not already known. Overall length measurements of chainsaw chains (such as "a 2 foot chain" etc.) are not helpful for finding the right chainsaw chain. This is because the overall length of chainsaw chains is determined by a combination of pitch (distance between links) and the number of drive links.This is the most accurate way for chain manufacturers to keep all the different sizes and types of chains in order. The number of links on a chain is normally not displayed on the tool like pitch and gauge, or listed in the manual. This is why the links must be counted.

Drive Links
[Back to top]   Chain-Matching Search StepsThe following are steps that should be taken before beginning a search for a matching chainsaw chain.

1. Get the pitch measurement of the chain either by finding it on the tool, in the user manual, or dividing the distance between 3 links by 2 (recommended that this be done by a shop).

2. Get the gauge measurement of the chain either by finding it on the tool, in the user manual, or by measuring the thickness of the chain's drive links with very accurate calipers.

3.Count the number of individual drive links in the chain. No exceptions.Now for the good news:the rest is easy. If you have those three numbers, matching the right replacement chain only takes a moment. Below are steps for using these 3 numbers with eReplacementParts.com's easy search filter features on our "Chainsaw Chains" page. All you have to do is click the correct measurements and number of links on the page, and it will automatically filter the search results to display only the chains that match those measurements.

 

1. Navigate to the "Chainsaw Chains" Page on eReplacementParts.com.

Below is a link to our Chainsaw Chains page:

https://www.ereplacementparts.com/chainsaw-chains-c-714_17587_17588.html

This page will display all of the nearly two hundred chainsaw chains that we currently carry, before the search results are narrowed that is.

2. Narrow Search Results by Pitch Measurement.

There is a box titled "Narrow Listings By:" at the top of the "Chainsaw Chains" page. Below the title of the box are click-able buttons in brackets for narrowing the displayed search results. Here's what it looks like:

Narrow Listings By Box

To narrow the search results to list only chains whose pitch number match the chain you're looking for, simply click the correct pitch measurement in the "Narrow Listings By:" box. When you do, the page will automatically refresh and display only the chains that match the selected pitch.

So, for example, if I were to click the "[3/8"]" button next to where it says "Pitch:", the page will only display chains with a 3/8" pitch when it automatically refreshes.

Also, after narrowing down the results by clicking a measurement, the click-able buttons for that measurement category will disappear when the page refreshes, since that chain quality has already been determined. So, after clicking the "[3/8"]" pitch measurement button, all of the "Pitch:" measurement buttons will disappear when the page refreshes.

 

3. Narrow Search by Gauge Measurement.

In the "Narrow Listings By:" box, select the correct gauge measurement by clicking the correct button as described in Step 2.

This will further narrow the search results to only chains that match both the previously-selected pitch measurement and the recently-selected gauge measurement.

Just as described above, the page will automatically refresh after making the new selection, displaying narrower search results and removing the "Gauge:" measurement buttons now that the measurement has been determined.

 

4. Narrow Search Results by Number of Links.

This is where having counted the number of links comes in handy. Now that pitch and gauge have been narrowed down, select the correct number of links counted on your chainsaw in the "Narrow Listings By:" box by clicking the correct link numberbutton next to the "Drive Links:" section.

This will automatically refresh the page and display only the chains that match the selected pitch, gauge, and number of links.

The search can also be narrowed further by manufacturer and availability if desired.   And that's it for selecting the right size chain! Once pitch, gauge, and number of drive links are selected, the search results still might display many different matching chains. This is because there are still a number of chain feature variations even within chains that have the same measurements.The next section of this article briefly discusses different chainsaw chain types and features, and their applications.[Back to top]   Chain AggressivenessThere are three different levels of chainsaw chain aggressiveness:

1. Low-Kickback/Anti-Kickback

2. Regular (Skip-Tooth), and

3. Aggressive (Full-Skip)

Low-Kickback/Anti-Kickback:

Example: 3/8" Pitch .050" Gauge Low-Kickback Chainsaw Chain

Most chainsaw chains have low-kickback or anti-kickback features that reduce the risk of kickback-related accidents.

Kickback is what happens when the upper nose of the chainsaw guide bar makes contact with a material during operation. This part of the chainsaw guide bar is referred to as the "Kickback Danger Zone," because, if it makes contact with a material during operation, the increased force of resistance will instantly throw the chainsaw back in the direction of the user (yikes). Kickback-related accidents are often gruesome.

The diagram below illustrates the "Kickback Danger Zone":

Kickback Danger Zone

The following caution appears at the top of our "Chainsaw Chains" Accessories page:

"NOTE: While any chainsaw chains can kick back, many of our chain saw chains lack kickback protection and are made for professional users only. If you have not received specialized training for kickback control and prevention, you should only purchase "Low Kickback" chains to help prevent injury."

This is actually pretty universal advice. A chainsaw user should have special training if using a chainsaw chain that lacks anti-kickback features.

For more about Chainsaw Kickback and Safety--Click here.

Because low-kickback chains often limit the amount of material being cut, the cutting goes a little slower than with more aggressive chains, however, low-kickback chains require less power for cutting, because they often have narrow kerfs.

It might also be useful to point out that most chain manufacturers have their own trademarked names for low-kickback feature designs available for their chains.

Low-Kickback Chain

 

Regular Chains (Skip-Tooth):

Example:3/8" Pitch .050" Gauge Skip-Tooth Chainsaw Chain

Skip-tooth chains space one link between cutting teeth. This allows for lower-resistance, faster, grittier cutting. If a chain is not listed as low-kickback, full-skip, or as having some other special function or feature, it is most likely a regular, skip-tooth chain for professional applications.

Skip-Tooth Chainsaw Chain

 

Aggressive (Full-Skip):

Example:3/8" Pitch .058" Gauge Full-Skip Chainsaw Chain

Full-skip chains space two links between cutting teeth, providing very low-resistance cutting. These chains are typically for saws with guide bars of 24" or longer. When trained to correctly use chains and saws of this length and cutting aggression, users often appreciate the extra length because they don't have to bend down as much to reach the work area.

However, these chains are for trained, professional use, and the majority of chainsaw users will not have an application that calls for this type of chain.

Full-Skip Chainsaw Chain
[Back to top]   Other Chainsaw Chain FeaturesThere are also a number of chainsaw chain features offered for many sizes and types of chains. These features often have catchy, trademarked names given by the manufacturers who design them, but we will just list them here generically by what they do.

 

Built-In Lubrication:

Manufacturers have several different design features that help to keep chains lubricated both during and between operation. These are usually grooves and/or holes in the cutting teeth or links that help lubricant stay on the chain.

Proper lubrication is naturally very important to a moving cutting tool like a chainsaw, so users may want to consider this feature if maintaining proper lubrication through conventional means sounds like a hassle.

 

Self-Sharpening Chains:

Self-sharpening chainsaw chains have design features that keep teeth filed as the chain passes around the guide bar. Sharpening is probably the biggest maintenance hassle that chainsaw users face, and is usually best done by a shop. Using a self-sharpening chain can help space those trips to the chainsaw shop further apart.

This feature does not always sharpen the chain completely evenly. Because of this, the teeth occasionally need to be touched up manually and eventually will need to receive regular sharpening maintenance. But self-sharpening chain features will keep the chain sharper longer overall.

 

Low-Vibration Chains:

Chainsaws and chainsaw chains receive vibration ratings from standardized testing. This is important because long term use of vibrating tools like chainsaws can cause serious health concerns to the hands (like pain, numbness, burning sensation, etc.)

In response to this concern, many chain manufacturers include design features that can greatly reduce saw vibration.

This is usually accomplished by creating a space between the chain and the guide bar that acts as a buffer against friction and, therefore, vibration.

Users should not be too concerned about chainsaw vibration if the saw sees only occasional use, but if using the saw is part of one's daily routine, a low-vibration chain becomes very important.

 

"Ripping" Chains:

Users searching through chain types might run into these. Ripping chains are for a very specialized, professional application that involves cutting lengths of wood along the grain. Using these chains requires extra skill and technique, so users will know it if they need one. Users of chainsaws for normal applications never have a need for ripping chains.

 

Carbide Chains:

Carbide is a kind of extremely hard and durable material, although it is quite brittle and can shatter when struck with force. Chainsaw chains made with carbide are designed to be more durable in environments that would quickly wear a normal chain out until useless.

Carbide chains can be very expensive, so they are normally only considered for uses where sand, cold weather, dirt, or other rough conditions would cause unusual wear to a chain.

Although their durability will keep the chain sharp longer and prevent wear, this results in a trade-off as carbide chains tend to be less sharp and slower-cutting overall.   There are more "bells and whistles" available for chainsaw chains than the ones listed here, but these cover the features that will be most common to average chainsaw applications. As discussed above, matching the 3 measurements is the most important step when shopping for a chain. After that, chain features and types can simply be matched to user preference and application.[Back to top]
ConclusionFor being just one kind of power tool accessory, there is a lot to get straight about chainsaw chains. Their unique systems of measurement require a little familiarity with terms and other technical things, but once those three magic numbers are jotted down, you're in the clear. If you're looking to get a new chain for your chainsaw, our Chainsaw Chains page is the place to start. With the information in this article, you're ready to use those search filtering features and narrow down the chain you're looking for with just a few clicks. Clicking around on our Chainsaw Chains page is also a great way to get more familiar with chain sizes and types, even if there's still some time before your next chainsaw chain replacement.
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The best Chainsaw Chain sharpening video ever

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