Nvidia graphics settings

Nvidia graphics settings DEFAULT

1. Right-click on your computer’s desktop and select 'NVIDIA Control Panel.'

 

 

2. Under Select a Task select 'Manage 3D Settings.'

 

 

3. Select the 'Global Settings tab' and choose 'High-performance NVIDIA processor' under the preferred graphics processor drop-down bar.

 

 

4. Use the scroll bar to navigate to the bottom of the Settings table in Global settings.

 

5.  Change the 'Texture Filtering Settings' to the following:

 

 

 

Sours: https://www.foresightsports.com/nvidia-graphics-card-settings

For computers with dual graphics card (discrete+integrated), the Windows 10 system automatically selects the graphics card by default. You can also manually select the discrete graphics card for a specific app or a program, but the signal output will be processed by the integrated graphics card.

There are two ways to set discrete graphics card as default.

Global settings

Applying discrete graphics card to all apps and programs:

  1. Right-click any blank space on the desktop and choose NVIDIA Control Panel.

  2. Click Manage 3D settings, go to Preferred graphic processor, and select High-Performance NVIDIA processor and then Apply.

Program Settings

Applying discrete graphics card for a specific app or program:

  1. Right-click any blank space on the desktop and choose NVIDIA Control Panel.

  1. Click Manage 3D Settings and select Program Settings. Click Add to add applications, select High-Performance NVIDIA Processor, and then click Apply.

Sours: https://consumer.huawei.com/en/support/content/en-us00689624/
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How to boost your PC game graphics with Nvidia Control Panel

When you install the drivers for an Nvidia GPU, they come packed with a couple of weighty pieces of software - Nvidia GeForce Experience and Nvidia Control Panel. At a glance, GeForce Experience jumps out at you more with its bold interface and options to auto-optimise your games. But it’s the non-descript Nvidia Control Panel - which wouldn’t look out of place in Windows XP - that really lets you fine-tune your in-game graphics.

We’ll be taking a look at the 3D Settings section of Nvidia Control Panel, sifting through its glut of graphical tweaks to pick out the ones most capable of making your games shine.

The Basics

To get started, open Nvidia Control Panel, then under 3D Settings in the navigation pane select ‘Adjust image settings with preview’. In the preview pane that opens, select ‘Use the advanced 3D image settings’. This will allow any changes you make to take effect.

Next, go to ‘Manage 3D settings’ in the left-hand pane to open the 3D Settings box. This is where you’ll be making your graphical tweaks.

Most of the settings under ‘Global Settings’ are best left at they are. Shader cache, for example is best left on as it stores a game’s shaders on your hard drive, precompiling them and giving a small boost to loading times and performance (particularly in open-world games).

You may also be tempted to crank ‘Power management mode’ up to ‘maximum performance’, but this will make your GPU run loud and hot at its max clock speeds when gaming. It’s overkill, and bad for the longevity of your card. ‘Optimal power’ is a good balance between performance and power.

Many of the 3D settings in NVCP just don’t work universally enough or have a tangible enough impact to recommend. So if we don’t mention a particular option, just stick with its default settings.

Anisotropic Filtering (AF)

In first- and third-person games, you spend a lot of time looking at walls and floors at oblique angles, with the given surface stretching off into the distance. 

The less texture filtering you have, the shorter the distance at which textures become blurred. It’s a bit like being short-sighted, but specifically for surfaces at angles. 

This is ostensibly done to improve performance, but these days your average GPU should be able to handle 16x anisotropic filtering with little trade-off.

Look at the path in these two shots from The Witcher 3. With AF switched off, it’s just a few feet before the path’s textures become murky (marked by the red line). With 16x AF, it retains its nice crunchy texture much further into the distance.

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Looking at the list of NVCP’s 3D settings, you might also spot ‘Texture filtering - Anisotropic Sample Optimization’, which can improve performance when you have AF switched on at a small cost in filtering quality. Only use this if you believe that AF is having a negative impact on game performance.

NVCP’s anisotropic filtering can work better than in-game AF settings, but this isn’t guaranteed, and other times it’s of identical quality (The Witcher 3 and F.E.A.R being cases in point). So it’s best to compare the NVCP with in-game AF methods (if there are any), and decide for yourself which works best.

DSR

DSR, or Dynamic Super Resolution, is one of the most ingenious tricks added to Nvidia’s Control Panel in recent years. By ticking the boxes in 'DSR - Factors', you unlock higher resolutions for your games (so 1.75x and 4x on a 1080p display will unlock 1440p and 4k resolutions respectively). 

Enable DSR - Factors under 'Global Settings', then go to your in-game resolution menu and you’ll see the higher resolutions listed. 

DSR renders the game at a higher resolution than your monitor’s native resolution, then squeezes it back down to fit you monitor, resulting in far fewer jagged edges and clearer textures. The catch is that DSR is just as strenuous on your GPU as if you were actually running that higher resolution, so expect big performance hits in more demanding games.

However, if you have a game that’s running at silky framerates on top settings - if you’ve got performance to spare, in other words - then it’s worth a go. It works for older games that don’t officially support anti-aliasing too, but beware of UIs in these games becoming extremely small at higher DSR factors. 

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These two images above from Dishonored 2 show a clear difference in texture fidelity on a 1080p display between no DSR and 4x DSR (4k, in other words). Everything in the image - from the painting of the gorilla to the flower in front - pops much more. The performance hit in this case was considerable however, knocking down the framerate from 75 to 30.

The 'DSR - Smoothness' option affects how much blur is applied to the image, offsetting any artifacting that may occur as a result of the forcefully downsampled resolution. We leave this at the default 33% in Global Settings, but you can tweak it on a by-game basis - lower will roughen edges, higher will blur the image.

Antialiasing (AA)

There are so many antialiasing options in the 3D Settings list that they can be overwhelming. Do they all work for all games? Can you switch them all on at the same time to turn your games into a veritable hotpot of velvety antialiasing? 

The answer is ‘no’, on both counts. The compatibility of these AA options varies greatly from game to game, so to an extent it’s a case of just trying them out for yourself. We can help you get started though.

Antialiasing - FXAA: Provides a layer of smoothing over the the top of other AA methods, reducing the visibility of jaggies at the cost of blurring. Low performance impact. 

It rarely works in modern games, but can look good in older games, particularly when combined with DSR. Some people complain that FXAA blurs the image too much, so it’s best switched on on a by-game basis. 

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With no DSR or FXAA, Civ 4’s ageing graphics look jagged and shifting all over. The string of the bow is barely visible. 

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With 4x DSR, the jaggies are greatly reduced. Note also how the texture on the road is much clearer. 

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Add some FXAA, and the jaggies are all but gone. Look closely enough, and you you can just about see the entire string of the archer’s bow too. Impressive. 

Antialiasing - Gamma correction: Largely outdated. Helps thin objects blend against contrasting backgrounds. Only affects older games with MSAA and CSAA. No harm in leaving it on on the off-chance it may help.

Antialiasing - Mode/Setting: Best left off in almost all circumstances. If a game has its own antialiasing options, then they will definitely do a better job than those in NVCP. You can try the ‘Enhance application setting’ option, but don’t expect miracles. The only time it’s worth trying to ‘Override’ application settings is when a game lacks its own AA options. Even then, these options aren’t guaranteed to work. The most universal form of antialiasing is DSR, so you’re better off experimenting with that than this.

Antialiasing - Transparency: Smooths out edges on so-called alpha textures - textures with transparency effects like wire fences and masses of leaves on trees. Apply only to games where you have performance to spare (it’s unlikely to work with most modern games anyway).

In the images from FEAR below, you can see how AA transparency smooths out the jarring pixelation on the fence. What you don’t see in the images is that without transparency those pixels on the fence shift and shimmer obscenely. With transparency, the fence becomes nice and static. For older games, this effect is well worth switching on.

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Multi-Frame Sampled AA (MFAA): A relatively recent effect for DX10 and more recent games. MFAA works over the top of MSAA (multisample antialiasing), improving its effects with little impact on performance.

The rough equation is that if you have 2x MSAA enabled, MFAA increases it to 4x, if you have 4x MSAA enabled, MFAA boosts it to 8x, and so on. It doesn’t work with all games, but you should keep it on in Global Settings as it might get your game a free graphical boost.

Robert Zak is a freelance writer for Official Xbox Magazine, PC Gamer, TechRadar and more. He writes in print and digital publishing, specialising in video games. He has previous experience as editor and writer for tech sites/publications including AndroidPIT and ComputerActive! Magazine. 

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/how-to/how-to-boost-your-pc-game-graphics-with-nvidia-control-panel
Beginners Guide to understanding Video Cards and Settings

Manage 3D Settings

The Manage 3D Settings page enables you to

  • Establish default 3D settings to use for all your Direct3D or OpenGL applications.

  • Establish a unique set of 3D settings for a particular game or application.  

Global Settings

From the Global Settings tab, you can select from a list of pre-installed global settings (for workstation products) or create your own custom settings to use when running 3D applications.

See Setting the Preferred Graphics Processor for information about a change in functionality in newer Windows 10 operating systems regarding setting the preferred graphics processor..

  • Preferred graphics processor (Only on systems using NVIDIA's power-saving GPU technology.) From the options in the list box, you can specify to   

  • Use high-performance NVIDIA processor for maximum performance or for decoding all video played on displays connected to the integrated graphics, or  

  • Use integrated graphics for longer battery life or for decoding all video content played on displays connected to the integrated graphics, or

  • Let the driver auto-select the most compatible graphics processor, depending on the program or video codec.

Notes:

    • Programs and videos that launch on external displays that are driven by the NVIDIA GPU will always use the NVIDIA GPU rather than the integrated graphics processor.

    • When you modify the "Preferred Graphics Processor" setting, programs that are already running will continue to use the same graphics processor uninterrupted. To allow the "Preferred Graphics Processor" settings to take effect, you must restart the program.

  • Restore button (bottom corner) restores the default global settings.  

  • Restore button (Global presets) restores the settings for the selected global preset to the default settings.

Program Settings

From the Program Settings tab, you can create a set of 3D settings to use when running a particular game or application.

See Setting the Preferred Graphics Processor for information about a change in functionality in newer Windows 10 operating systems regarding setting the preferred graphics processor.

  • Select a program to customize contains installed games and applications to which you have assigned unique 3D settings. Each line item has the game icon and the name of the game.

  • Add launches the Add dialog box which lists recently used programs, games, and Windows Store apps (under Windows 8). You can either select from the list or click Browse so you can navigate and locate the program or folder for which you want to establish unique settings.

  • Remove button deletes the game-settings association. Use this button to remove the game/settings association that you created when you no longer want the game to use the assigned settings. Pre-installed settings cannot be removed.

  • Restore button restores the settings for the selected program to the default settings.

  • Show only programs found on my computer. Check this box if you want the list to show only those games that are installed on your system. The driver can still detect any games that are played and apply the appropriate 3D settings, even if the installed-game list filter does not detect the game on the system.

  • Preferred graphics processor (Only on systems using NVIDIA's power-saving GPU technology.) From the options in the list box, you can specify to   

  • Use high-performance NVIDIA processor for maximum performance or for decoding all video played on displays connected to the integrated graphics, or  

  • Use integrated graphics for longer battery life or for decoding all video content played on displays connected to the integrated graphics, or

  • Let the driver auto-select the most compatible graphics processor, depending on the program or video codec.

Notes:

    • Programs and videos that launch on external displays that are driven by the NVIDIA GPU will always use the NVIDIA GPU rather than the integrated graphics processor.

    • When you modify the "Preferred Graphics Processor" setting, programs that are already running will continue to use the same graphics processor uninterrupted. To allow the "Preferred Graphics Processor" settings to take effect, you must restart the program.

Features and Settings

The Global Settings and Program Settings tabs include a list of features that you can set. The actual features that appear depend on the graphics card and application.

Ambient Occlusion enhances depth perception and adds realism to 3D scenes by providing a soft shadow effect to objects based on their placement in the scene. Select the level that provides the best balance between realistic effects and graphics performance.

This feature is not supported on all applications. Refer to this feature from the Program Settings tab to see if it is supported with your application.

NOTE: This feature requires the following minimum OS, API, and hardware:

  • Windows Vista and later

  • DirectX 10

  • GeForce 8 series and later GPUs

Anisotropic filtering is a technique used to improve the quality of textures applied to the surfaces of 3D objects when drawn at a sharp angle. Enabling this option improves image quality at the expense of some performance. You can choose either to let the application determine the anisotropic filtering settings, turn anisotropic filtering completely off, or select from a number available settings. Higher values yield better image quality while reducing performance.

Antialiasing - Mode allows you to control how NVIDIA antialiasing is applied in your 3D applications. See alsoTips for Setting Antialiasing.

NOTE: This feature is available only with GeForce 8 Series and later GPUs.   

  • Off turns off antialiasing.  

  • Application-controlled lets the application control the antialiasing level. This is the preferred setting to use for applications that have built-in antialiasing controls.

  • Enhance the application setting (with the settings specified under Antialiasing-Setting) provides the most reliable and highest quality antialiasing support if you want to use NVIDIA's antialiasing with applications that have built-in antialiasing controls.

  • To use this option, you must set the application's antialiasing to any level, such as 2x, then set NVIDIA's antialiasing using the Antialiasing - Setting feature. The NVIDIA antialiasing setting is applied regardless of the application's setting.   

  • Override any application setting (with the settings specified under Antialiasing-Setting) can be used if your application does not have built-in antialiasing control, or if your application uses high dynamic range (HDR) rendering but the built-in antialiasing does not work when HDR is enabled.

  • To use NVIDIA's antialiasing with applications that have built-in antialiasing controls, use Enhance the application setting.

Antialiasing - Setting allows you to set the antialiasing level to use in your 3D applications. You can choose either to let the application determine the antialiasing settings, turn antialiasing completely off, or select from a number of available settings.

NOTE: This feature is available on all GPUs. However, for GeForce 8 Series and later GPUs, this item is read-only if Application-controlled or Off was selected under Antialiasing - Mode.

  • Application-controlled lets the application control the antialiasing level. This is the preferred setting to use for applications that have built-in antialiasing controls.

  • None turns off antialiasing.

  • Specific antialiasing settings: The higher value corresponds to a higher level of antialiasing. For example, 16x is a higher quality setting than 2x.

  • SeeTips for Setting Antialiasing.

Antialiasing - FXAAimproves the image quality of programs with less of a performance impact than other antialiasing settings.  While this setting can be used in conjunction with other antialiasing settings, it is especially useful for programs that do not support hardware-based antialiasing.  

Antialiasing line gamma improves the color and quality of 3D lines in OpenGL programs.  

Antialiasing - Gamma correction allows you to enable or disable gamma correction antialiasing to improve the color and quality of 3D images in OpenGL programs.

Antialiasing - Transparency allows you to minimize the visible aliasing on the edges of images with transparent textures.

  • Multisampling provides superior performance.  

  • Supersampling provides superior quality.

  • With newer GPUs, specific antialiasing settings are available, limited by the value chosen under Antialiasing - Settings. For example, if you selected 4x AA, then the available transparency antialiasing values are 1x, 2x, and 4x, but not 8x.

Background Application Max Frame Rate sets the maximum frame rate that the GPU will render a game or 3D application running in the background. This helps reduce power consumption or fan noise when switching to an application while leaving another game or application running in the background. Range: 20-200

Buffer-flipping mode determines how the video buffer is copied to the screen in OpenGL programs.

CUDA - GPUs lets you specify one or more GPUs to use for CUDA applications. GPUs that are not selected will not be used for CUDA applications.

NOTE: At least one GPU must be selected in order to enable PhysX GPU acceleration.

CUDA - Double precision lets you select the GeForce GPUs on which to enable increased double-precision performance for applications that use double-precision calculations. Available on GeForce GPUs with the capability for increased double-precision performance.

NOTE: Selecting a GPU reduces performance for applications that do not use double-precision calculations, including games. To increase game performance, do not select any GPUs.

Deep color for 3D applications allows OpenGL 3D applications to be displayed in a color depth higher than what is supported by the Windows desktop. The application and the monitor must be capable of rendering deep color content.

Dynamic Boost maximizes system performance by dynamically shifting power between the GPU and the CPU. Available with R445 and later drivers.

  • On:  (default) The system determines and sets the optimal GPU and CPU power levels based on usage.

  • Off:   The GPU and CPU operate at their default power levels. Performance could be reduced. 

Enable overlay allows use of OpenGL overlay planes.

Exported pixel types determines the overlay pixel format to export so that OpenGL applications can use overlays. Format options include color-indexed (8-bpp), RGB555, or both color-indexed (8-bpp) and RGB555 format.

Image Sharpening lets you increase the level of sharpness, detail, or clarity of images in games and applications. This and the GPU Upscaling feature are introduced in R440 drivers.

  • SharpeningOff (default) disables the image sharpening controls.

  • Sharpening On enables the following image sharpening slider controls.   

    • Sharpen: Adjust the level of sharpness. Acceptable range: 0-1.0

    • Ignore Film Grain: Reduce the level of over-sharpening in applications that use film grain. Acceptable range: 0-1.0

  • GPU Upscaling: Select this check box to enable GPU upscaling on resolutions at or below the native resolution for all DirectX, Vulkan, and OpenGL games. When enabled, predefined resolutions are added to the resolution list on the Change Resolution page, and GPU scaling is set on the Adjust Desktop Size and Position page. You can also create custom display modes while this feature is enabled.  

Low Latency Mode reduces latency by limiting the number of frames the CPU can prepare before the frames are processed by the GPU.  This feature was introduced in R435 drivers.

  • Off (default) prioritizes render throughput by allowing games to queue frames.

  • On prioritizes latency by limiting queued frames to one.  

  • Ultra prioritizes latency by fully minimizing queued frames.   

Max Frame Rate lets youset the maximum 3D game or application frame rate that the GPU will render. Limiting the frame rate can be useful for extending battery life or for reducing system latency in certain scenarios. Introduced in R440 drivers.

  • Off (default) disables this feature.

  • On enables setting the maximum frame rate. Move the slider to the desired maximum frame rate (20-1000 fps) then click OK.

Monitor Technology selects the technique used to control the refresh policy of the connected monitor.

  • G-SYNC: Requires a G-SYNC capable display. Select this option to eliminate screen tearing, while minimizing input lag and stutter.   

  • ULMB: Select this option (Ultra Low Motion Blur) if you prefer to improve motion blur instead of using G-SYNC.  

  • Fixed Refresh Rate: Select this option to use the set refresh rate of the display without any variability or adaptation.

Multi-display/mixed-GPU acceleration.  Determines advanced OpenGL rendering options when using multiple displays and/or graphics cards, based on different classes of NVIDIA GPUs.   

  • Single display performance mode: Specify this setting if you have problems with the multi-display modes.

  • Compatibility performance mode is useful if you have two or more active displays when running in nView Dualview display mode or if you are using different classes of NVIDIA GPU-based graphics cards.

Note: When this mode is in effect, OpenGL renders in "compatibility" mode for all displays. In this mode, when different classes of GPUs are in use, the lowest common feature set of all active GPUs is exposed to OpenGL applications. The OpenGL rendering performance is slightly slower than in single-display mode.

  • Multiple display performance mode is useful if you have two or more active displays when running in nView Dualview mode or if you are using different classes of NVIDIA GPU-based cards.

Note:  When this mode is in effect, OpenGL renders in "performance" mode for all displays. As in "compatibility" mode, when different classes of GPUs are in use, the lowest common feature set of all active GPUs is exposed to OpenGL applications. However, the rendering performance is "faster" than in compatibility mode, although switching or spanning displays may result in minor transient rendering artifacts.

Multi-GPU performance mode determines the rendering mode used in multi-GPU mode. You can select single-GPU mode or one of several multi-GPU rendering modes.

OpenGL Rendering GPU lets you select which GPU to use for OpenGL applications. If one GPU from an SLI or Mosaic group is selected, then all GPUs in that group are used. Select Auto select to let the driver decide which GPU to use.

Note: This control is available only on Windows Vista and later Windows operating systems.   

Power management mode lets you set how your graphics card's performance level changes when running most DirectX or OpenGL 3D applications.

Note: This control is available only on GeForce 9 series and later GPUs.

  • NVIDIA driver controlled: Let the driver determine the best settings for performance and image quality. Typically, the GPU will operate at maximum performance when using SDI, G-Sync, or Mosaic features.

  • Adaptive: Save power by letting the graphics driver reduce GPU performance depending on the needs of the 3D application.

  • Prefer maximum performance: Use the GPU only at maximum performance when running most 3D applications.

  • Prefer consistent performance: Maintain the GPU at a consistent performance state when 3D applications are running. This setting is often used to provide reproducible results during software development and tuning.  

Preferred refresh rate (<monitor name>) lets you override the refresh rate limitations imposed by the 3D application for the indicated monitor.  This is particularly useful when viewing games in 3D stereo.

  • Application-controlled: Let the 3D application decide the optimum refresh rate.

  • If NVIDIA Stereoscopic 3D is installed but not enabled, then the "Application Controlled" option is forced and cannot be changed.

  • Highest Available:  Override the 3D application's setting with the highest available refresh rate to take advantage of high refresh rate displays and to enhance image quality.

  • If your application does not perform properly when using the "Highest Available" option, then select "Application-controlled" instead.

Notes:

  • This control is available only on Windows Vista and later Windows operating systems.   

  • This control is not available for applications identified as not supporting this feature.

  • If NVIDIA Stereoscopic 3D is installed and enabled, then the option is set to "Controlled by Stereo" and cannot be changed. You can see the refresh rate set in the Stereoscopic 3D "Test Stereoscopic 3D" dialog box.

  • This control is disabled if variable refresh rate is enabled.

Shader Cache Size (introduced in Release 495)controls the maximum amount of disk space the driver may use for storing shader compiles.  Shader compiles are normally performed each time a game runs and are a common cause of game-play stuttering.  The shader cache stores these compiled shaders so that subsequent runs of the same game do not need to perform the shader compilation.

Note: Installing a new driver will delete the cache; you may experience game play stutters the first time you run a game after installing a driver.

  • Current options include Disabled, Unlimited, or one of the following values: 128 MB, 256 MB, 512 MB, 1 GB, 5 GB, 10 GB, 100 GB

  • Guidelines:  Set a size limit which is large enough to cover the set of games you normally use, but not too large that it exceeds your available hard drive disk space.

    • Games vary greatly in the amount of cache space they require; higher end games may require several hundred megabytes.

    • On approaching the size limit, the driver will remove older shaders from the cache to make space for newer shaders; setting a size limit too small may cause the driver to remove shaders you still make use of and cause game play stutters.  

SILK Smoothness reduces stutter in games caused by variations in CPU or GPU workloads. It does this by smoothing out animation and presentation cadence using animation prediction and a post-render smoothing buffer.

    • Off: Disabled

    • Low: (Default) Applies moderate smoothing. Eliminates most micro-stuttering.  

    • Medium: Removes some stuttering and hitching in most games.

    • High: Applies additional smoothing, but may result in observable input lag.

    • Ultra: Applies maximum smoothing and eliminates most stuttering and hitching in games. May result in unacceptable lag in some games.

Note: Selecting High or Ultra can increase lag during gameplay, and may not be appropriate for first person shooter or competitive gaming.     

SLI performance mode determines the rendering mode used in SLI mode. You can select single-GPU mode, one of several SLI rendering modes, or SLI antialiasing mode which combines the power of multiple GPUs to offer higher quality antialiasing.  Each of these modes are mutually exclusive.

Stereo - Display mode allows you to select the display mode for stereo glasses or other hardware. Refer to the hardware documentation to learn which mode to use. Applies to Quadro cards running OpenGL stereo programs, as well as DirectX consumer stereo when stereoscopic 3D is enabled.

Stereo - Enabled.  Turn on this option only if it is necessary. Some applications automatically choose a stereo format while other applications may not function properly in a stereo pixel format.  Applies to Quadro cards running OpenGL stereo programs, as well as DirectX consumer stereo when stereoscopic 3D is enabled. This option is turned off if variable refresh rate is enabled.

Stereo - Force shuttering.  This setting forces the toggling of the stereo signal when shutter glasses or other 3D stereo hardware are not detected.  Applies to OpenGL stereo programs.

Stereo - Swap eyes. Turn on this option to switch the left and right stereo images if the stereo effect does not appear correctly with the current setting. Applies to Quadro cards running OpenGL stereo programs, as well as DirectX consumer stereo when stereoscopic 3D is enabled.

Stereo - Swap mode.  For active, frame sequential stereo, select when each stereo eye is updated with the next frame.  

  • Per Eye: Present a frame to one eye and then switch to the next frame and present it to the other eye. In this case, each eye is presented with different frames.

The maximum application frame rate is equal to the current display refresh rate. This setting is useful for applications that should run at the highest possible frame rate.

  • Per Eye-pair: Present each frame to both eyes sequentially before switching to the next frame. In this case, both eyes are presented with the same frame.

The maximum application frame rate is equal to half the display refresh rate. This setting is useful for stereo projectors that use a frequency doubling mechanism.

  • Application controlled: (Default) Let the application control the stereo swap mode by providing a swap interval. If the application does not actively control the stereo swap mode, then the driver attempts to apply the swap mode best suited for the particular application.   

Texture filtering - Anisotropic filter optimization improves performance by limiting trilinear filtering to the primary texture stage where the general appearance and color of objects is determined. This improves performance with minimal loss in image quality. This setting only affects DirectX programs.

Texture filtering - Anisotropic sample optimization limits the number of anisotropic samples used based on texel size. This setting only affects DirectX programs.

Texture filtering - Negative LOD bias determines if a negative level of detail bias is used to sharpen texture filtering.

  • Allow lets applications specify a negative LOD bias when anisotropic filtering is used.

  • Clamp prevents applications from using a negative LOD bias (the value is clamped to 0) when anisotropic filtering is used.

Texture filtering - Quality allows you to decide if you would prefer performance, quality, or a balance between the two. The NVIDIA Control Panel will make all of the appropriate 3D image adjustments based on your preference.

  • High performance offers the highest frame rate possible resulting in the best performance for your applications.

  • Performance offers an optimal blend of image quality and performance. The result is optimal performance and good image quality for your applications.

  • Quality (default setting for GeForce products) results in optimal image quality for your applications.

  • High Quality (default setting for Quadro products) results in the best image quality for your applications. This setting is not necessary for average users who run game applications. It is designed for more advanced users to generate images that do not take advantage of the programming capability of the texture filtering hardware.

Texture filtering - Trilinear optimization improves texture filtering performance by allowing bilinear filtering on textures in parts of the scene where trilinear filtering is not necessary. This setting only affects DirectX programs.

Threaded optimization allows applications to take advantage of multiple CPUs.

Triple buffering allows you to enable or disable triple buffering in OpenGL applications.  Turning on this setting improves performance when Vertical sync is also turned on.  

Unified back/depth buffer.   Enabling this option allocates one back buffer and one depth buffer for applications that create multiple windows. Turn on this option to use video memory more efficiently and improve performance.

Vertical sync allows you to control Vertical Synchronization mode, where the application's frame rate is synchronized with the display refresh rate in order to eliminate tearing.

NOTE: The following Vertical Sync setting values are applicable only when a display is connected to the NVIDIA GPU.

  • Use the application setting to use the settings within the application to control V-Sync.

  • Off is useful if performance is more important than image quality.

  • On is useful for eliminating tearing.

  • Adaptive turns V-Sync On only when the frame rate is faster than the refresh rate. This eliminates tearing at high frame rates, and stuttering at lower frame rates. This setting is available only if Monitor Technology is set to ULMB or Fixed Refresh Rate.

  • Adaptive 1/2 refresh rate turns V-Sync On only if the frame rate is faster than half the refresh rate.  This eliminates tearing at high frame rates, and stuttering at extremely low frame rates. This setting is available only if Monitor Technology is set to ULMB or Fixed Refresh Rate.

  • Fast improves latency without introducing tearing. Available on Pascal and later GPUs, on single-GPU configurations.    

Virtual Reality - Variable Rate Super Sampling improves image quality by applying super sampling selectively to the central region of a frame - the critical area for Virtual Reality headsets. Applies to NVIDIA-profiled applications on NVIDIA Turing GPUs when MSAA is enabled. The maximum super sampling applied depends on the MSAA level used in the application. Introduced in R440 drivers.

  • Adaptive applies super sampling to the central region of a frame, provided there is enough GPU headroom. The size of the central region varies according to the amount of GPU headroom available.  

  • Always On applies super sampling to a fixed-size central region of a frame. This mode does not consider GPU headroom availability and may result in frame drops.

  • Off (default) disables the feature.

WhisperMode is an ultra-efficient mode that makes your plugged-in laptop run quieter while gaming. It works by intelligently pacing the game’s frame rate while simultaneously configuring the graphics settings for optimal power-efficiency. Available on GeForce GTX 10-series laptop GPUs or higher, on single-GPU configurations. To see the WhisperMode controls in the NVIDIA Control Panel on supported systems, you must first enable WhisperMode using GeForce Experience.

  • Off: Disabled by GeForce Experience

  • On: Enabled by GeForce Experience and applied as a Global Setting. Frame rates are capped at 40 or 60 fps, depending on the application.

  • WhisperMode slider: Appears under Program Settings when enabled in GeForce Experience.  Move the slider to the left (decrease the maximum frame rate) for quieter gaming, or to the right (increase the maximum frame rate) for higher performance.

 

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Sours: https://www.nvidia.com/content/Control-Panel-Help/vLatest/en-us/mergedProjects/nv3d/Manage_3D_Settings_(reference).htm

Settings nvidia graphics

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