M5 bayonet ebay

M5 bayonet ebay DEFAULT

M-5 Bayonet

During the Korean War, the M-1 bayonet and M-1905 bayonet, which both mount to the M-1 Garand rifle using the same mechanism, were found to be very difficult to remove from the rifle with gloves on.

M5-1 BayonetPin it!Share on Facebook
M5-1 Bayonet
Photo: eBay seller sptsqn.

As a result the U.S. M-5 Garand bayonet was designed and issued in 1953. This was a total redesign and looks nothing like the original M-1905 or M-1 bayonets for the M1 Garand. The M-5 is the only U.S. bayonet without a barrel mount ring on the crossguard, making it look more like a fighting knife than a bayonet.

Today in WW II: 17 Oct 1941 USS Kearny [DD-432] torpedoed but not sunk by German submarine U-568, near Iceland, killing 11 sailors, the first American military casualties of WW II.  More ↓
17 Oct 1943 At Gothenburg, about 10,000 seriously wounded and sick German and British POWs, about half from each side, make up the first British-German prisoner exchange of WW II [17-21 Oct].
Visit the Olive-Drab.com World War II Timeline for day-by-day events 1939-1945! See also WW2 Books.

The M-5 bayonet has a 6 3/4 inch blade, and overall length is 11 1/2 inches. Weight is 11 1/2 ounces. The blade has one side sharpened for its full lenght and three inches of the other side are sharpened. There is a relatively large push button release to deal with the problem of working while having gloves on.

M5 Bayonet mount

The stud on the bayonet crossguard fits the gas cylinder lock screw under the Garand barrel. Locking grooves attach to the bayonet lug on the rifle. The M-5 fits only the M-1 Garand and does not interchange with any other firearms.

There were three different patterns made: M5, M5-1 and M5A1. Quoting from the authoritative article "The history of M1 Garand Bayonets" by Robert Gibson on the Fulton Armory website, the differences are as follows:

In Kuhnhausen's book the M5 and M5A1 are almost identical, with the differences being: (1) the grind of the cutting edge on the M5 goes straight all the way to the guard while the M5A1 curves to nothingness at the guard, and (2) on the M5 the spring that activates the lug release button is at right angles to the button and the tang, while on the M5A1 the tang is modified slightly with an angled surface so the spring is angled toward the point of the knife at about a 45 degree angle instead of at right angles. A third difference is the lug release piece. On the M5 it is a folded piece of sheet steel that when viewed from the front forms a U shape, while on the M5A1 though it is almost identical, there is a fold of metal to enclose the front of the button at the front of the button piece. Frank Burke

The grips are checkered black molded plastic and all metal parts are a dark gray parkerized finish. There are no markings on the blade. The manufacturer name or initials and "US M5" (or other model) will be found stamped under the cross guard. Many M-5 family bayonets were made in Korea after the Korean War and these will have "K" stamped in place of the "US". Manufacturers included Aerial Cutlery, Jones & Dickinson Tool, Imperial Knife, Utica Cutlery, and Columbus Milpar & Mfg. The M5-A1 was manufactured during the 1960s and was the last bayonet made for the M-1 Garand.

M8A1 Scabbard for M-4, M-5, M-6, and M-7 bayonet
M8A1 Scabbard for M-4, M-5, M-6, and M-7 bayonet.

There are two variations of this scabbard, both with an olive drab fiberglass body with steel throat. The early version, designated M8, has only a belt loop, no hook. The M8A1 retains the general look and can be slipped over a belt, but also has the M-1910 bent wire hook available. The model is stamped "US M8" or "US M8A1" on the flat steel part along with manufacturer initials. This sheath is correct for all post-war US bayonets including the M-4, M-5, M-6, and M-7. It was also used with the M-3 Fighting Knife.

The "Scabbard, Bayonet Knife, M8A1" is assigned NSN 1095-00-508-0339. It has been replaced by the black "Bayonet-knife scabbard M10", NSN 1095-00-223-7164. Huge numbers of the M8A1 were produced and surplused and are widely available.

There are many fine websites that have additional information on this topic, too many to list here and too many to keep up with as they come and go. Use this Google web search form to get an up to date report of what's out there.

For good results, try entering this: m5 bayonet. Then click the Search button.

Sours: https://olive-drab.com/od_edged_weapons_bayonet_m5.php

J.D. Tool Co. U.S. M5-1 Bayonet W/ Original Scabbard

SoldSee similar items$35.0014 Bids, Click to see shipping cost, 30-Day Returns, eBay Money Back Guarantee

Seller:gunslingerauctions✉️(1,883)99.1%, Location:Glendora, California, Ships to: US, Item:263919433969J.D. Tool Co. U.S. M5-1 Bayonet W/ Original Scabbard. Previously Owned Blade Length 6-5/8" & Overall Length 11-3/8"Condition:Used, Restocking Fee:No, All returns accepted:Returns Accepted, Item must be returned within:30 Days, Refund will be given as:Money Back, Return shipping will be paid by:Buyer

PicClick Insights - J.D. Tool Co. U.S. M5-1 Bayonet W/ Original Scabbard PicClick Exclusive

  •  Popularity - Very high amount of bids. 0 views, 0 views per day, 7 days on eBay. 1 sold, 0 available.
  • Very high amount of bids. 0 views, 0 views per day, 7 days on eBay. 1 sold, 0 available.

  •  Price -
  •  Seller - 1,883+ items sold. 0.9% negative feedback. Great seller with very good positive feedback and over 50 ratings.
  • 1,883+ items sold. 0.9% negative feedback. Great seller with very good positive feedback and over 50 ratings.

    Recent Feedback

People Also Loved PicClick Exclusive

Sours: https://picclick.com/JD-Tool-Co-US-M5-1-Bayonet-W-Original-263919433969.html
  1. Jimmy inn obituary
  2. Peterbilt 789
  3. Clearview library hours

CMP Forums > CMP General > Ask Each Other > Correct baynoett for 1955 M1?


PDA

View Full Version : Correct baynoett for 1955 M1?


reddog

12-30-2009, 03:50 PM

Can anyone give me detailed information for the correct bayonett & Scabbard.
I have found info for the M5 bayonett one source states it hase a 6" blade while another states it has a 7" blade & it came with the M8A1 scabbard.
What are they constructed of?
If anyone has pictures, or info to help me make a good purchase.
What would be a fair price? Thank Guys


KRAG-30-40

12-30-2009, 03:54 PM

For info on these bayonets http://www.usmilitaryknives.com/bayonet_points.htm


DDRode

12-30-2009, 04:24 PM

Any M1 Or M5 bayonet that you wanna stick on it is correct! The M1 Garand is not particular...and both types were in TOEs & arms rooms concurrently from the early 50s to the late 60s! And these days, a M1 bayonet w/M7 scabbard will run ya $100.00 - $200.00 and a M5, M5-1, or a M5A1 bayonet w/M8A1 scabbard will run ya $45.00 - $75.00!!!

http://cgi.ebay.com/MINTY-WWII-U-S-M1-GARAND-BAYONET-w-SHEATH_W0QQitemZ180448578640QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_ DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2a0392cc50

http://cgi.ebay.com/UC-US-M1-Garand-bayonet_W0QQitemZ200421194113QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH _DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2eaa08b981

http://cgi.ebay.com/M1-Garand-U-F-H-bayonet_W0QQitemZ200421344154QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH _DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2eaa0b039a

http://cgi.ebay.com/M5A1-M1-GARAND-BAYONET-and-Scabbard_W0QQitemZ370311892958QQcmdZViewItemQQptZL H_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item56384f0fde

http://cgi.ebay.com/Korean-War-era-US-M5A1-M1-Garand-Bayonet-MINT-Imperial_W0QQitemZ160389508231QQcmdZViewItemQQptZL H_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2557f5ac87

http://cgi.ebay.com/M1-Garand-M5-IMPERIAL-Bayonet-W-Scabbard_W0QQitemZ370290202614QQcmdZViewItemQQptZL H_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item56370417f6

http://cgi.ebay.com/US-KOREAN-M1-GARAND-M5-RIFLE-BAYONET-MINT-IN-WRAP_W0QQitemZ280444613028QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_De faultDomain_0?hash=item414bcd31a4

Shop EBAY selectively and you'll find one you like at a price of your choosing!!!

:):D;)


Rondog

12-30-2009, 04:54 PM

If you sit tight, Orest has said that the CMP expects to get a bunch of bayonets pretty soon.


reddog

01-04-2010, 03:57 PM

Will CMP let us know when & if bayonets become available,Which types & how much?


JoeW2111

01-04-2010, 06:28 PM

"Any M1 Or M5 bayonet that you wanna stick on it is correct! The M1 Garand is not particular...and both types were in TOEs & arms rooms concurrently in the 50s and 60s!"

Not so, at least not in the Marine Corps. And, as the Army always got gear before the Marines, I am pretty sure that M1 bayonets were not used by the Army after 1955 either. In about 1955, all M1 bayonets were replaced with the M5 or M5A1 and the M1 bayonet was no longer issued. Can you just imagine Marines falling out for inspection and half had M5A1 bayonets and the other half had the M1 bayonet. I don't think so. It may have remained in use in reserve units for some time, this I don't know.
By the way, I still have the M5A1 bayonet and M8A1 scabbard I was issued at Camp Lejeune in 1956.
Your best bet would be a M5A1, not only would it be correct for a 1955 mfg rifle but it will also be the least expensive.


Blockhead

01-04-2010, 07:22 PM

Will CMP let us know when & if bayonets become available,Which types & how much?

No, they plan on selling them to us without us knowing anything ;)

Don't worry, they'll let us know in plenty of time for most of us to spend way too much money. And I can't wait :)


DDRode

01-04-2010, 07:39 PM

"Any M1 Or M5 bayonet that you wanna stick on it is correct! The M1 Garand is not particular...and both types were in TOEs & arms rooms concurrently in the 50s and 60s!"

Not so, at least not in the Marine Corps. And, as the Army always got gear before the Marines, I am pretty sure that M1 bayonets were not used by the Army after 1955 either. In about 1955, all M1 bayonets were replaced with the M5 or M5A1 and the M1 bayonet was no longer issued. Can you just imagine Marines falling out for inspection and half had M5A1 bayonets and the other half had the M1 bayonet. I don't think so. It may have remained in use in reserve units for some time, this I don't know.
By the way, I still have the M5A1 bayonet and M8A1 scabbard I was issued at Camp Lejeune in 1956.
Your best bet would be a M5A1, not only would it be correct for a 1955 mfg rifle but it will also be the least expensive.

Don't have any idea of what was going on in the USMC in the 50s (I was 3 in '50 and 12 in '59) & I'm not too worried about how Marines fell out for inspection! BUT...if you really want me to change it to read "and both types were in the TOEs of active and/or reserve forces & were to be found concurrently in many active and/or reserve unit arms rooms throughout the 50s and 60s (1953-1969)"...well, I'd be happy to oblige!

AND...we had both types of bayonets for the Garand (actually, we had M1 & M5 bayonets for the M1 Garands, M4 bayonets for the M1 Carbines, M6 bayonets for the M14s, & M1917 bayonets for the M12 trench guns) in the base armory at NAVSTA KEFLAVIK, ICELAND in 1968...we SQUIDS were using M1 Garands, M1 Carbines, BARs, and Browning 1919A4 machine guns in the GDF (Ground Defense Force), while the JARHEADS were using M14s and M60s, as well as a coupla 90mm Recoiless Rifles! I can only comment on what I know to be true....I can't comment on what you don't know!

AND JoeW2111...can you explain why the GUIDEBOOK FOR MARINES (10TH REVISED EDITION...FIRST PRINTING...DECEMBER 1, 1965) has ONLY the M1 BAYONET in each and every illustration/photograph where a bayonet is depicted? The M5/M5-1/M5A1 is nowhere to be seen!!!

:):D;)


Dan Mac

01-04-2010, 08:04 PM

Gentlemen, please look at your current GCA journal. In it you will find a photo of a Seabee holding a Garand, taken on Okinawa in 1962. What's that sticking out the front of the Garand? It ain't no M5! Ain't no M5A1 either! If it fit, it got used!!


edlmann

01-04-2010, 08:15 PM

...can you explain to me why the GUIDEBOOK FOR MARINES (10TH REVISED EDITION...FIRST PRINTING...DECEMBER 1, 1965) has ONLY the M1 BAYONET in each and every illustration/photograph where a bayonet is depicted! The M5/M5-1/M5A1 is nowhere to be seen!

Maybe they just screwed up.

Very common for updated military manuals to recycle old art until the daguerrotypes wear out - and to use a wrong picture entirely.

An example: click here (http://3pdf.com/download-free-9-1005-226-pdf-ebook.htm) and download TM 9-1005-226-14. On page 85 you find "Figure 66. Lyman rear sight 48WH assembly-exploded view." Then, flip over to page 88 and compare it to, "Figure 67. Receiver extension rear sight assembly-exploded view (Lyman rear sight No. 525)". :confused::eek:


DDRode

01-04-2010, 08:16 PM

Gentlemen, please look at your current GCA journal. In it you will find a photo of a Seabee holding a Garand, taken on Okinawa in 1962. What's that sticking out the front of the Garand? It ain't no M5! Ain't no M5A1 either! If it fit, it got used!!

There ya go! Please see the inside back cover of the GCA JOURNAL...WINTER 2009! It is a photo of Leon Theriault taken in Camp Kubasaka, Okinawa in 1962 when he was with MCB5 (United States Navy (SeaBees)! He is striking a pose with an M1 Garand with a M1 (not a M5/M5-1/M5A1) bayonet attached!

:):D;)


JoeW2111

01-05-2010, 12:01 PM

[FONT="Comic Sans MS"][SIZE="4"]Don't have any idea of what was going on in the USMC in the 50s (I was 3 in '50 and 12 in '59) & I'm not too worried about how Marines fell out for inspection! BUT...if you really want me to change it to read "and both types were in the TOEs of active and/or reserve forces & were to be found concurrently in many active and/or reserve unit arms rooms throughout the 50s and 60s (1950-1969)"...well, I'd be happy to oblige!

AND...we had both types of bayonets for the Garand (actually, we had M1 & M5 bayonets for the M1 Garands, M4 bayonets for the M1 Carbines, M6 bayonets for the M14s, & M1917 bayonets for the M12 trench guns) in the base armory at NAVSTA KEFLAVIK, ICELAND in 1968...we SQUIDS were using M1 Garands, M1 Carbines, BARs, and Browning 1919A4 machine guns in the GDF (Ground Defense Force), while the JARHEADS were using M14s and M60s, as well as a coupla 90mm Recoiless Rifles! I can only comment on what I know to be true....I can't comment on what you don't know!

AND JoeW2111...can you explain why the GUIDEBOOK FOR MARINES (10TH REVISED EDITION...FIRST PRINTING...DECEMBER 1, 1965) has ONLY the M1 BAYONET in each and every illustration/photograph where a bayonet is depicted? The M5/M5-1/M5A1 is nowhere to be seen!!!



First off, what I wrote is based on first hand knowledge not what I read in guidebooks or other publications. When I wrote "reserve" forces I was going to include "Navy" but was afraid that would only start a "Navy / Marine" gripe. :mad: The Navy, not being a ground force (yes I know about the SEALS) did not keep very up to date when it came to small arms. In the 1950s sailors in boot camp were still training with the M1903s, so I am not at all supprised with what you have written and have no doubt it is true. As you stated "Squids" were using the "Browning 1919A4, carbines and BARs in 1968 while the jarheads were using the M60 and M14", kind of outdated for 1968, woudn't you say ?
As far as the "Guide Book for Marines", whatever edition you look at you will see old photos especially in cases where the photo does not conflict with the lesson. In fact some of the same photos in latter editions of "Guidebooks" can be found in much earlier editions. Alot of things such as the use of the bayonet, did not change enough between the 1940s and the 70s to warrant a change to the photos. You will see many photos from WW2 and the Korean era in late "Guidebooks". Don't forget that the Marine Corps never had the money other branches of the services had and they wasted very little.

As far as "Arms Rooms". That is a Navy term not used in the Marine Corps of the 1950s. While in the Marine Corps I was a 2111, "Small Arms Repairman". The armory was located in the supply building. The bayonet was a supply item and not kept locked in the armory. The bayonets were stored along with other supply issued items such as 782 gear (packs, helmets, web gear and the like). For a few years, in the mid 50s, we still had a ton of the M1 bayonets stored in the supply building, but they were not for issue. Only the M5s were issued.

It may be more correct to say "and both types were in the TOEs of active and/or reserve NAVAL forces & were to be found concurrently in many active and/or reserve NAVAL unit arms rooms throughout the 50s and 60s (1950-1969)"... :)

And to get back to the original post, the question was "WHAT BAYONET AND SCABBARD WOULD BE CORRECT FOR A M1 MANUFACTURED IN 1955 ?". So I will modify my answer to "Except for the Naval Service, the most correct bayonet would be the M5A1 and a M8A1 scabbard.


JoeW2111

01-05-2010, 12:42 PM

Gentlemen, please look at your current GCA journal. In it you will find a photo of a Seabee holding a Garand, taken on Okinawa in 1962. What's that sticking out the front of the Garand? It ain't no M5! Ain't no M5A1 either! If it fit, it got used!!

That may "fit" in the Navy but not in the Marine Corps or Army. :D


DDRode

01-05-2010, 02:11 PM

First off, what I wrote is based on first hand knowledge not what I read in guidebooks or other publications. When I wrote "reserve" forces I was going to include "Navy" but was afraid that would only start a "Navy / Marine" gripe. The Navy, not being a ground force (yes I know about the SEALS) did not keep very up to date when it came to small arms. In the 1950s sailors in boot camp were still training with the M1903s, so I am not at all supprised with what you have written and have no doubt it is true. As you stated "Squids" were using the "Browning 1919A4, carbines and BARs in 1968 while the jarheads were using the M60 and M14", kind of outdated for 1968, woudn't you say ?
As far as the "Guide Book for Marines", whatever edition you look at you will see old photos especially in cases where the photo does not conflict with the lesson. In fact some of the same photos in latter editions of "Guidebooks" can be found in much earlier editions. Alot of things such as the use of the bayonet, did not change enough between the 1940s and the 70s to warrant a change to the photos. You will see many photos from WW2 and the Korean era in late "Guidebooks". Don't forget that the Marine Corps never had the money other branches of the services had and they wasted very little.

As far as "Arms Rooms". That is a Navy term not used in the Marine Corps of the 1950s. While in the Marine Corps I was a 2111, "Small Arms Repairman". The armory was located in the supply building. The bayonet was a supply item and not kept locked in the armory. The bayonets were stored along with other supply issued items such as 782 gear (packs, helmets, web gear and the like). For a few years, in the mid 50s, we still had a ton of the M1 bayonets stored in the supply building, but they were not for issue. Only the M5s were issued.

It may be more correct to say "and both types were in the TOEs of active and/or reserve NAVAL forces & were to be found concurrently in many active and/or reserve NAVAL unit arms rooms throughout the 50s and 60s (1950-1969)"...

And to get back to the original post, the question was "WHAT BAYONET AND SCABBARD WOULD BE CORRECT FOR A M1 MANUFACTURED IN 1955 ?". So I will modify my answer to "Except for the Naval Service, the most correct bayonet would be the M5A1 and a M8A1 scabbard.

WRONGO MONGO!!!

AND...I'll still stick with my original comment..."Any M1 Or M5 bayonet that you wanna stick on it is correct! The M1 Garand is not particular...and both types were in TOEs & arms rooms concurrently from the early 50s to the late 60s (1953-1969)! And these days, a M1 bayonet w/M7 scabbard will run ya $100.00 - $200.00 and a M5, M5-1, or a M5A1 bayonet w/M8A1 scabbard will run ya $45.00 - $75.00!!!"

AND...you are correct in saying that the USN did use M1903s for D&C (Drill & Ceremony) in Navy BOOT CAMP...even in '66 when I was there! BUT...we qualified with the M1 GARAND!

AND...Active And/Or Reserve Forces include the UNITED STATES ARMY, UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE, UNITED STATES ARMY NATIONAL GUARD, UNITED STATES NAVY, UNITED STATES NAVY RESERVE, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE RESERVE, UNITED STATES AIR NATIONAL GUARD, ...and just so you won't feel left out...the UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS & UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS RESERVE!

AND...As I said earlier...I can't comment on what you don't know...BUT I can comment on what I know & what I experienced in my 22 years (1965-2000) of service in the USN, USNR, USAR, & the MNARNG! I did get around...and see & do a little (didn't see or experience everything)...just a little!

AND...ARMS ROOM is correct as used in the USA and the USAF...if you exclusively called it an ARMORY in the USMC...that's just fine! The USN also uses the term, BUT...both terms are used in the other services (ARMS ROOMS may be located in barracks, headquarters buildings,etc...even ARMORIES...e.g. NATIONAL GUARD ARMORY)!

SO...BOTTOM LINE...your experiences during your 2-4 year hitch at Camp Lejuene in the USMC back in the mid-50s MAY NOT be the norm as experienced in ALL Active and/or Reserve Forces between 1953-1969!!!

PS: I encountered M1 BAYONETs in USAR ARMS ROOMS in the early eighties (not an issue item, BUT they were still around)!!!

See:

http://www.wbdg.org/ndbm/pdfs/ufc4_215_01_draft.pdf (US ARMY...US NAVY...US MARINE CORPS...US AIR FORCE...ARMORIES AND ARMS ROOMS)

“Armory” is the Navy and Marine Corps term defining a facility, usually free-standing,
containing one or more separate weapon storage and distribution spaces. Armories
are defined in UFC 2-000-05N, Facility Planning Criteria for Navy/Marine Corps Shore
Installations, Category Code 143 45. An armory for Fleet Marine Force air and ground
units provides humidity controlled, air conditioned and secure space for storing and
maintaining weapons assigned to personnel. In planning for a Marine Corps armory,the
method is to build the space requirements by weapon and ammunition count. The
weapons/equipment within the armory is typically stored within cabinets, gun racks,
shelving, boxes, or wall boards. In most cases, this method of storage allows some
stacking of the weapons/equipment which can reduce floor space requirements. To
calculate space requirements, the space allocation for a Marine Corps armory can be
determined by using the UFC 2-000-05N, Facility Planning Criteria for Navy/Marine
Corps Shore Installations space planning tool on the NAVFAC portal. Adjustments can
be made for units that do not conform to infantry battalion model, such as squadron or
logistics battalion. Comply with OPNAVINST 5530.13C, Physical Security Instruction
for Conventional Arms, Ammunitions, and Explosives. Additional policy and guidance
can be found in MCO 5530.14A. Navy and Marine Corps Armories store only small
quantities of ammunition for personal use weapons in a safe in the facility. The Army
also has large free-standing weapons storage facilities in specialized circumstances
(identification of which shall be FOUO). The Army more typically stores weapons in an
Arms Room within another facility. See Table 2-1 from UFC 2-000-05N for space
allowance.
Table 2-1 Navy Shore Armory Gross Areas
Installation
Military Strength
Building
Gross Area (SF)
Building
Gross Area (SM)
up to 2,000 576 53.5
2,001 - 4,000 880 81.75
4,001 - 7,500 1,200 111.5
7,501 - 10,000 1,508 140.1
Over 10,000 Add 0.1 sq ft per person Add 0.001 sm per person
The space above provides for an armory and small arms shop supporting only the
weapons and personnel assigned to that installation.
2-2.1.1.1 Portable Armory.
An armory constructed and designed to be relocatable. They are a custom fabrication
built in accordance with Naval Surface Warfare Specification 3046-93.2. Relocatable
Armories are not permanent Armory solutions.
2-2.1.2 Arms Rooms.
Army arms rooms are constructed according to the requirements of Army Regulation
(AR) 190-11; these are facilities, similar in function to the weapons storage spaces of
armories, with very limited maintenance and repair facilities. Standard Army practice is
to have an arms room built inside or adjacent to each line company headquarters
building. Arms rooms are also located inside military police buildings, special
operations centers, reserve training facilities, and other installations. If required, add
space for a small amount of ammunition storage. Air Force arms rooms are governed
by Air Force Instruction (AFI) 31-101, The Air Force Installation Security Program
UFC

www.armytoolbag.com/Tools/Maintenance/ArmsRm/ArmsRmSOP3.doc (US ARMY...ARMS ROOM SOP)

http://www.armystudyguide.com/content/useful_files/SOPs_Policy_Letters/arms-room-sop-2.shtml (US ARMY...ARMS ROOM AND RELATED INSPECTIONS)

:):D;)


JoeW2111

01-05-2010, 04:12 PM

Can anyone give me detailed information for the correct bayonett & Scabbard.
I have found info for the M5 bayonett one source states it hase a 6" blade while another states it has a 7" blade & it came with the M8A1 scabbard.
What are they constructed of?
If anyone has pictures, or info to help me make a good purchase.
What would be a fair price? Thank Guys

Cole's book of U.S. Military Knives and Bayonets states that the blade of the M5 is 6 5/8 inch long. The blade on my M5-1 (AERIAL) is 6 5/8 ".


DDRode

01-05-2010, 04:17 PM

See:

http://armscollectors.com/whbayo.htm

AND...my M5 (IMPERIAL) blade is 6.625", my M5-1 (J&D Tool Company) blade is 6.625", and my M5A1 (MILPAR) blade is 6.5"!

:):D;)


JoeW2111

01-05-2010, 05:22 PM

http://armscollectors.com/whbayo.htm

[AND...my M5 (IMPERIAL) blade is 6.625" long, my M5-1 (J&D Tool Company) blade is 6.625" long, and my M5A1 (MILPAR) blade is 6.5" long!]



That's because your "IMPERIAL" is probably aftermarket commercial production. :D;):rolleyes:

"Aerial and Imperial both made M5 and M5A1 bayonets, although Aerial used the M5-1 mark and Imperial used M5A1. I believe those made by Aerial are all US contract, but have seen a number of Imperial marked M5A1s that are almost certainly aftermarket commercial production. They lack the DAS and the backcut is long and sloping rather than the near 90-degree backcut that was standard." as per Gary Cunningham (Bayonet Points)


DDRode

01-05-2010, 05:29 PM

That's because your "IMPERIAL" is probably aftermarket commercial production.

"Aerial and Imperial both made M5 and M5A1 bayonets, although Aerial used the M5-1 mark and Imperial used M5A1. I believe those made by Aerial are all US contract, but have seen a number of Imperial marked M5A1s that are almost certainly aftermarket commercial production. They lack the DAS and the backcut is long and sloping rather than the near 90-degree backcut that was standard." as per Gary Cunningham (Bayonet Points)

My IMPERIAL is an M5...NOT a M5A1!!! Sie begreifen???

See:

http://www.usmilitaryknives.com/bayo_points_5.htm

http://www.thegca.org/Bayonets409.pdf

:):D;)


DDRode

01-06-2010, 02:30 PM

WRONGO MONGO!!!

AND...I'll still stick with my original comment..."Any M1 Or M5 bayonet that you wanna stick on it is correct! The M1 Garand is not particular...and both types were in TOEs & arms rooms concurrently from the early 50s to the late 60s (1953-1969)! And these days, a M1 bayonet w/M7 scabbard will run ya $100.00 - $200.00 and a M5, M5-1, or a M5A1 bayonet w/M8A1 scabbard will run ya $45.00 - $75.00!!!"

AND...you are correct in saying that the USN did use M1903s for D&C (Drill & Ceremony) in Navy BOOT CAMP...even in '66 when I was there! BUT...we qualified with the M1 GARAND!

AND...Active And/Or Reserve Forces include the UNITED STATES ARMY, UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE, UNITED STATES ARMY NATIONAL GUARD, UNITED STATES NAVY, UNITED STATES NAVY RESERVE, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE RESERVE, UNITED STATES AIR NATIONAL GUARD, ...and just so you won't feel left out...the UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS & UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS RESERVE!

AND...As I said earlier...I can't comment on what you don't know...BUT I can comment on what I know & what I experienced in my 22 years (1965-2000) of service in the USN, USNR, USAR, & the MNARNG! I did get around...and see & do a little (didn't see or experience everything)...just a little!

AND...ARMS ROOM is correct as used in the USA and the USAF...if you exclusively called it an ARMORY in the USMC...that's just fine! The USN also uses the term, BUT...both terms are used in the other services (ARMS ROOMS may be located in barracks, headquarters buildings,etc...even ARMORIES...e.g. NATIONAL GUARD ARMORY)!

SO...BOTTOM LINE...your experiences during your 2-4 year hitch at Camp Lejuene in the USMC back in the mid-50s MAY NOT be the norm as experienced in ALL Active and/or Reserve Forces between 1953-1969!!!

PS: I encountered M1 BAYONETs in USAR ARMS ROOMS in the early eighties (not an issue item, BUT they were still around)!!!

See:

http://www.wbdg.org/ndbm/pdfs/ufc4_215_01_draft.pdf (US ARMY...US NAVY...US MARINE CORPS...US AIR FORCE...ARMORIES AND ARMS ROOMS)

“Armory” is the Navy and Marine Corps term defining a facility, usually free-standing,
containing one or more separate weapon storage and distribution spaces. Armories
are defined in UFC 2-000-05N, Facility Planning Criteria for Navy/Marine Corps Shore
Installations, Category Code 143 45. An armory for Fleet Marine Force air and ground
units provides humidity controlled, air conditioned and secure space for storing and
maintaining weapons assigned to personnel. In planning for a Marine Corps armory,the
method is to build the space requirements by weapon and ammunition count. The
weapons/equipment within the armory is typically stored within cabinets, gun racks,
shelving, boxes, or wall boards. In most cases, this method of storage allows some
stacking of the weapons/equipment which can reduce floor space requirements. To
calculate space requirements, the space allocation for a Marine Corps armory can be
determined by using the UFC 2-000-05N, Facility Planning Criteria for Navy/Marine
Corps Shore Installations space planning tool on the NAVFAC portal. Adjustments can
be made for units that do not conform to infantry battalion model, such as squadron or
logistics battalion. Comply with OPNAVINST 5530.13C, Physical Security Instruction
for Conventional Arms, Ammunitions, and Explosives. Additional policy and guidance
can be found in MCO 5530.14A. Navy and Marine Corps Armories store only small
quantities of ammunition for personal use weapons in a safe in the facility. The Army
also has large free-standing weapons storage facilities in specialized circumstances
(identification of which shall be FOUO). The Army more typically stores weapons in an
Arms Room within another facility. See Table 2-1 from UFC 2-000-05N for space
allowance.
Table 2-1 Navy Shore Armory Gross Areas
Installation
Military Strength
Building
Gross Area (SF)
Building
Gross Area (SM)
up to 2,000 576 53.5
2,001 - 4,000 880 81.75
4,001 - 7,500 1,200 111.5
7,501 - 10,000 1,508 140.1
Over 10,000 Add 0.1 sq ft per person Add 0.001 sm per person
The space above provides for an armory and small arms shop supporting only the
weapons and personnel assigned to that installation.
2-2.1.1.1 Portable Armory.
An armory constructed and designed to be relocatable. They are a custom fabrication
built in accordance with Naval Surface Warfare Specification 3046-93.2. Relocatable
Armories are not permanent Armory solutions.
2-2.1.2 Arms Rooms.
Army arms rooms are constructed according to the requirements of Army Regulation
(AR) 190-11; these are facilities, similar in function to the weapons storage spaces of
armories, with very limited maintenance and repair facilities. Standard Army practice is
to have an arms room built inside or adjacent to each line company headquarters
building. Arms rooms are also located inside military police buildings, special
operations centers, reserve training facilities, and other installations. If required, add
space for a small amount of ammunition storage. Air Force arms rooms are governed
by Air Force Instruction (AFI) 31-101, The Air Force Installation Security Program
UFC

www.armytoolbag.com/Tools/Maintenance/ArmsRm/ArmsRmSOP3.doc (US ARMY...ARMS ROOM SOP)

http://www.armystudyguide.com/content/useful_files/SOPs_Policy_Letters/arms-room-sop-2.shtml (US ARMY...ARMS ROOM AND RELATED INSPECTIONS)

Continuer ... S'il vous plaît!!!

:):D;)


Sours: http://forums.thecmp.org/archive/index.php/t-4838.html
U.S. Fighting Knives and Bayonets M1 thru M7

Collecting the M4 Bayonet

When German paratroopers and land forces sped over Europe to begin WWII, the U.S. Army Ordnance Department sped up their search for an infantry weapon for rear echelon troops and crew-served weapons that was more accurate than a handgun, lighter than the US M1903 and M1917 rifles, and less expensive than the Thompson submachine gun. Finally, in 1941, the U.S. military adopted the M1 Carbine — but no bayonet for the weapon.

The M1 and M1A1 carbines were produced without any capacity to attach bayonets. The thought was that the carbine’s light barrel could not withstand the rigors of bayonet fighting.

When the need for a bayonet became obvious, the Ordnance Department efforts revolved around developing a combination knife-bayonet. Six knives were tested, five of which were based on designs patterned after the M1918 MkI trench knife. The sixth was a knife with a D-guard handle.

FROM M3 TRENCH KNIFE TO M4 BAYONET

These early prototypes made the new light-weight carbine muzzle heavy which was deemed unsatisfactory. The Ordnance Department shelved the project and focused on creating a new combat knife. Troops who had been issued carbines would have to rely on the newly developed M3 trench knife until a satisfactory bayonet could be developed.

Reports from the field soon revealed that troops were improvising bayonets for their carbines, however. Clearly, they wanted a bayonet that they could attach to their carbines.

M4 Carbine Bayonet: Conversion of Camillus Blade-Marked M3 Trench Knife

courtesy of www.AdvanceGuardMilitaria.com
1-DSC_0505

With production of the M3 trench knife well underway, the Ordnance Department renewed the quest for a new bayonet in 1943. They developed and field-tested prototype bayonets that they designated the T4, T5, and T6.

The T4 consisted of an M3 knife blade while the T5 and T6 were spike bayonets similar to those designed for the No.4 Lee-Enfield. All three were attached to the carbine via a barrel ring tightened by a wing nut similar to the already developed M8 grenade launcher.

The M3-bladed T4 was the most desirable, but without a handle, none were useful other than as a bayonet. Furthermore, the wing nut was insufficient to securely attach any of the bayonets to the end of the carbine.

Comparing the M3 Knife to the M4 Bayonet

IMG_1469 (1)

Eventually, in 1944, the Ordnance Dept. decided to create a bayonet based on the M3 trench knife which it designated the T8. To create the T8, they removed the pommel of the M3 and replaced it with a single catch latch plate. The standard hilt was ground off in favor of a guard with a muzzle ring.

During field tests, it was found that a second catch was necessary to prevent the bayonet from becoming accidentally detached from the carbine. The Ordnance Dept. told all M3 manufacturers of to stop production immediately.

Finally, on May 10, 1944, the new bayonet (designated the “M4”) was adopted. Full production began in July of the same year. The M4 bayonet was issued with the same M8A1 scabbard used for the M3 trench knife.

BARREL BANDS AND THE M4 BAYONET

There are three distinct types of barrel bands found on M1 carbines. Collectors have dubbed them the “Type 1,” “Type 2,” and “Type 3.” Jesse Harrison’s book on M1 carbines refers to them as the “Type A,” “Type B,” and “Type C.

To accommodate a bayonet, however, the M1 carbine would require a new barrel band. The military designated the new band the T4 (Type 3 in collectors’ parlance). According to Bruce Canfield’s Complete Guide to the M1 Carbine and the M1 Garand, Winchester and Inland were the only manufacturers who produced carbines with the T4 (Type 3) band during WWII.

M4 Guards, blades, and pommels

IMG_1475

USING THE BAYONET IN THE FIELD

Photographic evidence suggests that very few M1 carbines capable of accepting M4s were used during WWII. Those that were issued appear to have been used in the Pacific Theater during the Okinawa campaign.

Beginning in September 1944, M4s were issued to troops for use as a combat knife even though their weapon may not have been able to accommodate a bayonet. After WWII, however, most M1 carbines were retrofitted to accept the M4 bayonet.

Several concerns arose after the M4 bayonet was issued to troops in the field. For example, the two pins that held the latch in place and were designed to be driven out of the catch plate via two small holes drilled into the grip for repairs. In use, these pins had a tendency to become lose and fall out. To rectify this, orders were put out to stake the pins in place in February 1945.

Another concern that arose were the cracks that could develop on the guard in the area of the muzzle ring. In 1951, Springfield Armory developed a new guard that was thicker and wider to resolve this issue.

Beginning in 1954, the M4 bayonet received further improvements. Cracking around the muzzle ring was still a problem, so it was widened further.

Like the M3, the leather handle of the M4 was susceptible to mildew and rot. The new production bayonets were made with black plastic grips similar to those seen on the M5/M5A1 bayonets. Unlike the leather grips which were held on by the peen on the pommel of the bayonet, a pair of screws held the new production M4 grips in place. This made maintenance easier in addition to reducing weight when the tang was milled out to allow the screws to pass through to the other side.

“In the 1990s, Camillus produced a commercial version of this bayonet. It differs in that the center of the “M” in Camillus and the “M4” goes all the way to the bottom of the tang. It is smooth-peened, and the “X” is vertical instead of horizontal. The latch plate is painted rather than Parkerized.” — U.S. Knife Bayonets & Scabbards, by Gary Cunningham

WHY RUBBER GRIPS ON SOME M4 BAYONETS?

Periodically, collectors will encounter M4 bayonets with rubber grips similar in appearance to the original leather grips. The countries of Norway, Greece, and South Korea are also known to have manufactured M4 bayonets for military use. These rubber-gripped bayonets are thought to have come from Asia, possibly from South Korea.

M4 Bayonet Production

Aerial Cutlery Company: 91,898
Camillus Cutlery Company: 332,698
W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery Co.: 224,764
Imperial Knife Company: 917,894
Kinfolks, Inc: 119,702
Pal Blade Company: 268,000
Utica Cutlery Company: 515,000

Total Production: 2,469,956

Turner Manufacturing, Imperial Knife Company, Conetta Tool and Die, and Bren-Dan Inc. received the contracts for this run of M4 bayonets which finally ended in 1970. The only known production number from this later period are the 298,691 bayonets Turner Manufacturing turned out in 1954.

[Source: U.S. Knife Bayonets & Scabbardsby Gary Cunningham. U.S. Small Arms of World War II by Bruce Canfield shows slightly different production numbers.]

M4 Bayonet Values

The legacy of the M4 bayonet, regardless of origin or variation, lives on to this day. Not only did the M4 become the first successful dual-role bayonet developed by the U.S., by combining the role of a bayonet and combat knife, it set a trend in bayonet design that continues to present day. 

You may also enjoy

*French Gras Bayonets for the Belgian Army in WWI & WWII

*Favorite Find: My Father's Bayonet

*The Versatile M7 Bayonet

*The M8 / M8A1 Scabbard

*As an Amazon Associate, Military Trader / Military Vehicles earns from qualifying purchases.

Ryan Roth is a Policy Specialist at FrontlineCo, a Springfield, Il. based association management company. He is a graduate of the University of Illinois at Springfield with M.A. and B.A. degrees in Political Science and a minor in History. In his free time, Ryan works on the family farm and enjoys reading, horseback riding, engaging in the shooting sports, playing music and guitar, telling tall tales about his riverboat days, and adding to his collection.

Sours: https://www.militarytrader.com

Ebay m5 bayonet

 

After my book was published, I received several comments from edged weapon collectors that I had misused the terms obverse and reverse ricasso. After some research I found that indeed the common standard used by knife collectors was exactly opposite to what I had written. Knife collectors commonly have the point to the left with the true edge down, while most bayonet collectors show bayonets in the opposite direction, that is, point to the right with the true edge down.

Bayonet collectors have traditionally oriented their bayonets the way they would be if they were displayed on the weapon. Since most small arms have the action oriented for the right handed user, the arm naturally points to the right when displayed on a horizontal rack. Most bayonet books show the bayonets in this orientation.

However, to avoid confusion I have since used the terms left ricasso and right ricasso, as these seem to be more generally understood by most "blade" collectors regardless of what particular field they collect. To those that I have confused in the past, I apologize and hope that using left and right will result in a better understanding by all.

 

The M1905 Reproduction Bayonet Revisited

Awhile back I received an email from a collector wanting to know if I had any information on a Utica Cutlery M1905 bayonet dated 1942 with a blue finish rather than being Parkerized. I had to say that I did not, but I have learned to say that few things are impossible so I asked for more information. After another email or two, the collector realized that he had one of the current reproductions as offered by IMA and possibly other sources. After he realized what he had, he proceeded to find a correct specimen and then was kind enough to offer the repro to me at a reduced price. Normally I don’t put much of my hard to come by money into these, but since his had the scabbard and I did not have one of those in my reference collection, I purchased it from him.

30-01.jpg (34718 bytes) 

Overall view of the reproduction M1905 bayonet and M3 scabbard

I mentioned these in some detail in Bayonet Points #13, but feel it might be worth another look as these are commonly turning up on Ebay and at shows, often being represented as originals. Unfortunately I recently examined one at a show that had been apparently recently Parkerized. The odd "Ordnance" marking on the right ricasso had been partially removed so it was no longer obvious at first glance. I inquired as to the price, thinking I might buy it to illustrate in one of these articles, but the price was too high. It was not identified as a reproduction, and I would not swear that the seller was aware that it was. If this becomes common, it may be pretty hard to tell one of the new ones from originals.

The first of these that I purchased had the "fantasy" maker mark of M.D.C.O., and most of the finish had been removed, possibly to make it look old and used. Since then I have seen a few, but did not have the opportunity to inspect them in detail. When I received this one, I looked carefully at the finish, which was about 98%. It did look very much like a smooth glossy dark blue, almost black. Looking with a magnifier at some small areas where the finish was worn or missing, I discovered that the finish is actually an enamel or lacquer. With a little oil, it can easily pass for blue unless examined closely.

30-02.jpg (88171 bytes)

Interior of the M1905 reproduction. All that I have examined have numbers on both grips and the lower tang. This is an assembly number to keep these parts together, not a serial number. All that I have seen have been three digits or less. The "Ordnance Escutcheon" mark on the right ricasso is a quick way to identity this as a reproduction, but fakers may begin removing it and refinishing the bayonets to make them more difficult to identify.
The U.C. marking is quite close to the original, and is well stamped and centered. Unless you are very familiar with the mark, it would be easy to mistake it for an original. The interior cuts are different enough not to be mistaken for WW2 production.

30-03.jpg (144354 bytes)

Above is an original WW2 production Utica Cutlery M1905 bayonet, below is the current reproduction. The markings are similar enough to fool the inexperienced collector, although in a side by side comparison they can easily be told apart.

The scabbard is very similar to an original M3, with the exception that the body is a solid plastic material, while the originals had a cotton duck body impregnated with a thermosetting plastic. In the originals, this weave of this cotton material may be seen in the plastic, while the reproduction is perfectly smooth. The throat is very much like the original, lacking only the B-N or VP mark under the lip. The US in the Shell and Flame is quite close to the original. On the two or three reproductions that I have seen, the metal throat is painted in the same color OD paint as the body.

30-04.jpg (66660 bytes)

On the left is an original WW2 production M3 scabbard, on the right the modern reproduction. Note the weave of the fabric visible in the original. The markings are not identical, but are quite similar.

 

A "Personalized" M1 Bayonet

Although military knives are often found that have been modified by their owners to suit their personal tastes, it is uncommon to find a bayonet that has been modified. This is probably due to the fact that knives were generally considered more personal equipment than the bayonets, and the rules against modifying the bayonets were more strictly enforced,

Sometime back I found this M1 bayonet on Ebay and found it interesting. I was fortunate enough to be able to buy it rather inexpensively and was glad to be able to add it to my "curiosities" collection.

The M7 scabbard has had two white diamonds in white cloth tape, and the throat has been painted white. The paint is thick and roughly brushed on.

 

30-05.jpg (29421 bytes)

The Personalized M1 Bayonet and M7 Scabbard

The bayonet is a 1920 Springfield cut to 10 inches. The interior of the tang and the upper and lower exterior tang is also painted white. The grips have been replaced with a clear Plexiglas, quite possibly from an aircraft canopy. The back of each grip has had photographs attached, and then were painted white on the back. The photos are of a young woman and appear to be of the World War Two period, based on hairstyle and the dress she is wearing. Presumably this is the wife or girlfriend of the serviceman.

30-06.jpg (58401 bytes)

Photo under the right grip

 

30-07.jpg (55269 bytes)

Photo under the left grip

Although a bayonet such as this is not common, it is of little interest to most collectors and does not command a high price. But to "historical" collectors such as myself, it is a very personal reminder that those who fought the war were men with girlfriends or wives that they left behind. One of the reasons that I collect militaria is that items such as this are artifacts of history which bring us closer to those who made it.

 

An Early Danish M5 Bayonet

While browsing at a local gun show recently, I noted a totally unmarked M5 bayonet on a dealer’s table. I looked it over carefully, and with permission, removed the grips. The grips are also unmarked, but differ only in very minor details from the early "fat" M5 grips. It is a pure M5 without the later M5A1 modifications. The dealer told me that it had came in a shipment of Danish M/62 bayonets such as described by Bill Porter in Porter’s Report #4 and was the only unmarked one it the batch. Presumably it is early production by Horster, but why it is unmarked is unknown. The scabbard is the wood grained type marked crown over HTK associated with the Horster M5s. As it was inexpensive, I picked it up as a curiosity.

30-08.jpg (58219 bytes)

Unmarked M5 Bayonet

 

30-09.jpg (42061 bytes)

Unmarked guard

 

30-10.jpg (90188 bytes)

Unmarked pommel

 

The bulk of the Danish bayonets that have been imported recently are as new condition M5A1 bayonets by Eickhorn, mostly dated in the early 1990s. As Bill mentioned, these were really never intended to be used as bayonets by the Danes, but were instead issued as Trench Knives to troops not armed with the bayonet. It should be noted that since these were not required to be used as bayonets, they will not always fit on an M1 rifle.

 

30-11.jpg (45524 bytes)

Eickhorn Made Danish M5A1 Bayonet and Scabbard

 

30-12.jpg (36129 bytes)

Guard Marking on Danish Contract M5A1 by Eickhorn

 

30-13.jpg (98355 bytes)

Pommel Marking on Danish Contract M5A1 by Eickhorn

 

The Eickhorn version is considerably different in construction than the US model. While US M5A1 bayonets used two pieces pinned to the tang to great the undercut groove and a separate pommel (called butt plate) peened to the tang. Eickhorn developed a single piece containing the undercut groove and a pommel, which was then attached by two roll pins to the tang. The piece appears to be a casting, and certainly simplifies construction.

 

30-14.jpg (103274 bytes)

Above – US M5A1 Bayonet by Imperial

Below – M5A1 Danish Contract Bayonet by Carl Eickhorn

All of the above reports referred to and the books are available on our Books For Sale  and or Documents page.

Back to Bayonet Points Index

Back to Main Index

Sours: http://www.usmilitaryknives.com/bayo_points_30.htm
A look at the M5-1 Bayonet

M5 bayonet

Bayonet

M5 Bayonet
US-Military-M5-Bayonet1.jpg

U.S. military M5 Bayonet with M8 scabbard

TypeBayonet
Place of originUnited States
In service1953–1960s
Used byUS Army
WarsKorean War
Vietnam War
Designed1953
Manufacturer
  • Aerial Cutlery
  • Jones & Dickinson Tool
  • Imperial Knife
  • Utica Cutlery
  • Columbus Milpar & Mfg
Produced1953 through ?
Length11.5 in (29 cm)
Blade length6.5 in (17 cm)

Blade typeSpear Point

The M5 Bayonet was adopted by the U.S. military in 1953 to replace other bayonets for the M1 Garand rifle. It uses the M8A1 scabbard.

Background[edit]

During the Korean War, the M1 bayonet, which mounted to the M1 rifle, was found difficult to remove while wearing heavy gloves. As a result, the M5 bayonet was designed and issued in 1953. This was a total redesign based on the M4 bayonet used by the M1 carbine. The M5 bayonet looks nothing like the original M1 bayonet, and is the only U.S. bayonet without a barrel mount ring on the crossguard, making it look more like a fighting knife than a bayonet.

Description[edit]

The M5 bayonet has a 6¾ inch blade, and overall length is 11½ inches. Weight is 11½ ounces. The blade has one side sharpened for its full length and three inches of the other side are sharpened. There is a relatively large push button release to deal with removal while wearing gloves.

The stud on the bayonet crossguard fits the gas cylinder lock screw under the M1 barrel. Locking grooves attach to the bayonet lug on the rifle. The M5 fits only the M1 and does not interchange with any other firearms.

There were three different patterns made: M5, M5-1 and M5A1.

M5 Bayonet crossguard labeled US M5

The grips are checkered black molded plastic and all metal parts are a dark gray parkerized finish. There are no markings on the blade. The manufacturer name or initials and "US M5" (or other model) will be found stamped under the cross guard. Many M5 family bayonets were made in Korea after the Korean War and these will have "K" stamped in place of the "US". Manufacturers included Aerial Cutlery, Jones & Dickinson Tool, Imperial Knife, Utica Cutlery, and Columbus Milpar & Mfg. The M5A1 was manufactured during the 1960s and was the last bayonet made for the M1 Garand.[1]

M8 and M8A1 Scabbard[edit]

There are two variations of this scabbard, both with an olive drab fiberglass body with steel throat. The early version M8 scabbard only had a belt loop and lacked the double hook that earlier bayonet scabbards had for attaching to load carrying equipment such as the M1910 Haversack. The improved M8A1 scabbard manufactured later in WW II has the M1910 bent wire hook. The scabbard throat flange is stamped "US M8" or "US M8A1" on the flat steel part along with manufacturer initials. Some M8 scabbards were later modified by adding the M1910 hook. Later M8A1 scabbards were manufactured with a modified extended tab on the web hanger to provide more clearance for the M5 bayonet which rubbed against the wider bayonet handle.[2] This sheath is correct for all post-war US bayonets including the M4, M5, M6, and M7. It was also used with the M3 fighting knife.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to M5 bayonet.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M5_bayonet

Now discussing:

We arrived at the club. Around 9 pm, there were still very few people, lonely couples at the tables and a couple of girls at the bar. Girls, are you lesbians by chance. - suddenly asked, as if in jest, Oleg. We were already drunk enough to answer in unison: We did not stop and continued Well, 30 years have.



182 183 184 185 186