Torx bits

Torx bits DEFAULT

Tamper-Resistant Torx Bits

Hex Shank

Hex Shank for Power Tools

An opening at the tip accommodates the pin in the recess of tamper-resistant Torx screws. These are also known as pin-in-Torx bits.

Hexshankbits(also known as insert bits) are used in hand drivers or with a bit adapter in power tools.

Hexshankbitsforpowertools have a groove in the shank and fit directly into power tools without an adapter. They offer more reach for recessed holes and less wobble compared to a hex shank bit used with an adapter.

3D CAD models availableFor technical drawings and 3-D models, click on a part number.

Reversible Tamper-Resistant Torx Bits

Turn two fastener sizes with one reversible bit—remove and replace to change the size. These bits have an opening at the tips to accommodate the pin in the recess of tamper-resistant Torx screws. Also known as insert bits, they are used in hand drivers.

SizeOverall
Lg.
Material Each

With Ball Detent

5/16" Hex Shank Size

T8 × T102 7/8"Steel0000000000000
T15 × T202 7/8"Steel000000000000

Bit Assortments

These assortments contain general-purpose bits.

Hexshankbits(also known as insert bits) are used in hand drivers or with a bit adapter in power tools.

Hex

Tamper-Resistant Hex

Phillips

Slotted

Torx

Square

Drilled Spanner

Pozidriv®

Tamper-Resistant Torx

Torq-Set®

Tri-Wing®

No.
of
Pieces
Components
Included
Bits
Included
Adapters
Included
Drive
Tools
Included
 Each

1/4" Hex Shank Size—Steel

3026 Bits
3 Adapters
1 Drive Tool
Tamper-Resistant Hex: 3/32", 7/64", 1/8", 9/64"
   5/32", 3/16", 7/32", 1/4" (1" O'all Lg.)
Tamper-Resistant Torx: T9, T10, T15, T20
   T25, T27, T30, T40 (1" O'all Lg.)
Square: No. 1, No. 2 (1" O'all Lg.)
Torq-Set®: No. 5, No. 8 (1" O'all Lg.)
Pozidriv®: No. 2 (1" O'all Lg.)
Drilled Spanner: No. 6, No. 8
   No. 10 (1" O'all Lg.)
Tri-Wing®: No. 4, No. 5 (1" O'all Lg.)
1/8" Male Square Drive
   × 1/8" Hex Shank Adapter
1/4" Male Square Drive
   × 1/4" Hex Shank Adapter
2 1/8" Lg. Bit Adapter 
   for Power Tools 
8 3/4" Lg. Bit Screwdriver 000000000000
3936 Bits
2 Adapters
1 Drive Tool
Phillips: No. 1, No. 2 (1" O'all Lg.)
Slotted: 1/4", 5/16" (1" O'all Lg.)
Tamper-Resistant Hex: 5/64", 3/32", 7/64"
   1/8", 9/64", 5/32" (1" O'all Lg.)
Tamper-Resistant Torx: T8, T10, T15, T20
   T25, T27, T30, T40 (1" O'all Lg.)
Square: No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 (1" O'all Lg.)
Torq-Set®: No. 6, No. 8, No. 10 (1" O'all Lg.)
Pozidriv®: No. 0, No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 (1" O'all Lg.)
Drilled Spanner: No. 4, No. 6, No. 8, No. 10 (1" O'all Lg.)
Tri-Wing®: No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4 (1" O'all Lg.)
1/4" Female Square Drive
   × 1/4" Female Hex Adapter
2 1/4" Lg. Bit Adapter 
   for Power Tools 
Screwdriver Handle 000000000000
10096 Bits
4 Adapters
Phillips: No. 0 (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Phillips: No. 1, No. 3 (1" O'all Lg.)—2 ea.
Phillips: No. 2 (1" O'all Lg.)—4 ea.
Slotted: 3/32", 1/8", 5/32", 3/16", 7/32", 1/4"
   9/32", 5/16", 3/8" (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Hex (Inch): 0.050", 1/16", 5/64", 3/32", 7/64"
   1/8", 9/64", 5/32", 3/16", 7/32", 1/4"
   5/16", 3/8" (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Hex (Metric): 1.5 mm, 2 mm, 2.5 mm, 3 mm
   4 mm, 5 mm, 6 mm, 7 mm, 8 mm (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Tamper-Resistant Hex (Inch): 3/32"
   7/64", 1/8", 9/64", 5/32", 3/16", 7/32"
   1/4", 5/16" (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Tamper-Resistant Hex (Metric): 2.5 mm, 3 mm
   4 mm, 5 mm, 6 mm, 8 mm (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Torx: T5, T6, T7, T8, T9, T10, T15, T20, T25, T27
   T30, T40, T45, T50, T55 (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Tamper-Resistant Torx: T6, T7, T8, T9, T10, T15
   T20, T25, T27, T30, T40 (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Square: No. 0, No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, No. 4 (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Pozidriv®: No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Drilled Spanner: No. 4, No. 6, No. 8, No. 10
   No. 12, 1/4" (1" O'all Lg.)—1 ea.
Screw-In Hook Driver Bit—1 ea.
1/4" Male Square Drive
   × 1/4" Hex Shank Adapter (1" O'all Lg.)
1/4" Male Square Drive 
   × 1/4" Hex Shank Adapter (2" O'all Lg.)
2 1/2" Lg. Bit Adapter 
   for Power Tools 
Bit Adapter for Square Drive Tools
__00000000000

Tamper-Resistant Torx Bit Sets

Hex Shank

Hex Shank for Power Tools

An opening at the tip accommodates the pin in the recess of tamper-resistant Torx screws. These are also known as pin-in-Torx bits

Hexshankbits(also known as insert bits) are used in hand drivers or with a bit adapter in power tools.

Hexshankbitsforpowertools have a groove in the shank and fit directly into power tools without an adapter. They offer more reach for recessed holes and less wobble compared to a hex shank bit used with an adapter.

3D CAD models availableFor technical drawings and 3-D models, click on a part number.

Components
Included
Bits
Included
MaterialContainer
Type
 Each

1/4" Hex Shank Size

7 BitsTamper-Resistant Torx: T7, T8, T9, T10, T15, T20, T25 (1" O'all Lg.)SteelPlastic Case0000000000000

1/4" Hex Shank Size for Power Tools

10 BitsTamper-Resistant Torx: T7, T8, T9, T10, T15, T20, T25, T27, T30, T40 (2" O'all Lg.)SteelPlastic Caddy000000000000

Bit Screwdrivers

With Plain Grip

Torx

Tamper-Resistant Torx

Insert a bit into the shaft and a magnet holds it in place.

Tamper-resistantTorx are also known as pin-in-Torx.

Shaft

Material

For Bit Hex
Shank
Size
No.
of
Sizes
Sizes
Included
O'all
Lg.
Lg.O'all
Wd.
ShaftBitHandleGrip
Style
Features Each
1/4"6Torx: T10, T15, T20, T25, T30, T409 1/4"4 3/4"7/16"Nickel-Plated SteelSteelPlasticPlain__0000000000000
1/4"9Tamper-Resistant Torx: T8, T9, T10, T15,
T20, T25, T27, T30, T40
8 3/4"4"7/16"Nickel-Plated SteelSteelPlasticPlainBit storage inside tool000000000000
Sours: /torx-security-bits/

Bit History: The Torx

This is the sixth and final article in our ongoing series of posts on the history of screwdriver bits. We’ve be posting one a day leading up to tomorrow’s launch of the Manta Driver Kit and Mahi Driver Kit.

So you know when you’re sitting in a bathroom stall and you hatch a diabolical plan to disassemble the entire room?

Just me? Admittedly, I do have some strange tendencies—but I’m a teardown engineer. A passion for reverse engineering is pretty much a job requirement. As an added benefit, my fascination with disassembly has made me all too aware just how many Torx screws are floating around the bathrooms and vending machines in this world. (By the way, I’m not the only one who has noticed.)

More technically named the hexalobular bit (and commonly referred to as star-drive by people wielding power tools), the Torx screw (not its bastard brother, the Torx Security screw) holds a special place in my heart.

First developed in 1967 by Camcar Textron and patented in 1971, the Torx bit was designed to complement a new wave of more accurate torque-limiting machinery. Prior to this, automatic screwdrivers relied on the sloping walls of Phillips screws to cam out when they reached their torque limit—a compromise that meant a little extra wear on the screw and driver to save both from breaking due to over-torquing.

However, with the advent of more precise machinery, this camming wasn’t required—and a bit with more solid contact could be used. As the Torx name suggests, the absence of tapered side walls and a much larger contact surface on the Torx bit allowed machines to torque fasteners up to their mechanical limits without slipping or camming out.

Hex vs Torx

The benefits of limited torque application are twofold: it protects tool and workpiece from the wear of camming out. Because stripped screws universally suck.

Mangled Torx bit
Mangled torx screw

The development of accurate torque-limiting machinery changed manufacturers’ needs, and the tools of their trade. Torx screws, for example, radically changed the trade of gunsmithing.

“Before Torx, which appeared in 1967, all firearms relied on slothead screws, which were designed to make ordinary shooters miserable and enable gunsmiths to drive around in Bentleys,” writes Field and Stream’s David Petzal.

With slot heads, the blade slipped from the screw—mangling the screw, the gun, or the owner. Torx screws, on the other hand, were mechanically superior and nearly impossible to strip. The Torx, in a word, is tough.

But the story of Torx screws isn’t all sunshine and repair daisies. In fact, one of its initial selling points was that it was a patented, proprietary, security screw. In other words, it kept device owners out of their stuff. Initially, Torx screws were used to lock emissions units in automobiles. Even Apple was quick to jump on the tamper-proof train with the original 128K Macintosh.

But where there’s a will to tinker, there’s a way. And reverse-engineers of the world found a way to un-screw themselves by creating Torx bits, Torx Security bits, and in most recent years, Torx Plus bits. So, now any member of the general public with access to a hardware store also has access to their Torx-guarded things.

Today, Torx bits are hugely popular—trailing behind only the age-old Phillips and Flathead we know and love. Formerly king of the tamper-proof automotive domain, the now-ubiquitous standard is found everywhere from mobile phones to residential construction. (I even found it lurking behind the odd Snapchat Spectacles Bot. No, I didn’t take the Bot apart—though I was sorely tempted to.)

And while many of us have experienced the pain of looking down the head of a Torx screw while wielding only a Phillips or slotted driver, take solace in knowing the Torx can take all the abuse you throw at it. Both our Manta Driver Kit and Mahi Driver Kit include the Torx bit in a full range of sizes—something you may want to keep in mind next time you find yourself stuck in a bathroom stall somewhere.

While you’re here, check out our previous posts on the Flathead, the Robertson, the Phillips, the Pentalobe, and the Spanner. And be sure to join our mailing list—you’ll be the first to find out when the Manta Driver Kit and Mahi Driver Kit drop tomorrow.

Sours: https://www.ifixit.com/News/9909/bit-history-the-torx
  1. Durafit dpf
  2. Taxis in ithaca
  3. 1974 ford f750

Torx® Bits

Product Categories

Apex Tool Group
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Contact Apex Fasteners

Torx® fasteners are becoming more and more common in automotive and appliance assembly. Apex provides a full selection of bits for Torx screws.

Displaying 1 to 16 (of 16 products)

Displaying 1 to 16 (of 16 products)

Sours: https://apexfasteners.com/fasteners/
Torx screws and what the numbered tips mean

35 Piece 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" Drive Torx Bit Socket Set

Special Price$491.49Regular Price$546.10

35 Piece 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" Drive Torx Bit Socket Set

Details

  • 35 Piece 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" Drive Torx Bit Socket Set
  • Female TORX® sockets are manufactured to rigid standards.
  • Through-hole Bit Socket design makes it easier to replace worn or broken bits: simply pop the old bit out and insert a new replacement bit.
  • New Bit Holder Design is 9 times stronger and helps prevent the bit from slipping out of the socket while working.
  • Made in USA.
  • Set includes:
    • 1/4" Drive Bit Sockets - T8, T10, T15, T20, T25, T27, T30 TORX
    • 3/8" Drive TORX® Bit Sockets - T40, T45, T47, T50, T55
    • 1/2" Drive TORX® Bit Socket - T60
    • 1/4" Drive Tamper-Proof TORX® Bit Sockets - T7, T8, T10, T15, T20, T25, T27, T30
    • 3/8" Drive Tamper-Proof TORX® Bit Sockets - T40, T45, T50, T55
    • 1/4" Drive Female TORX® Sockets - E4, E5, E6, E7, E8
    • 3/8" Drive Female TORX® Sockets - E10, E12, E14, E16
    • 1/2" Drive Female TORX® Socket - E18

More Information

Specialty Socket TypeTorx

Reviews

Sours: https://sktools.com/35-piece-1-4-3-8-and-1-2-drive-torx-bit-socket-set.html

Bits torx

27200 Torx® Bit Set

12 Pc. Torx® Bit Set

A 12 pc. set includes the T-10 through T-50, plus the T-47, T-55 and T-60 bits.

Available Individually:

Part NumberTorx® Bit SizeDrive
26560T-101/4" drive
26570T-151/4" drive
26580T-201/4" drive
26590T-251/4" drive
26600T-271/4" drive
26610T-301/4" drive
26620T-403/8" drive
26630T-453/8" drive
26500T-473/8" drive
26640T-503/8" drive
26650T-553/8" drive
26520T-601/2" drive
26540Vinyl Holder 

 

 

 

Sours: https://www.lislecorp.com/specialty-tools/torx-bit-set-135
Best Star (Torx) Bit Brand? Milwaukee, DeWalt, Makita, Ryobi, Wera, Wiha, Irwin, Bosch, Bauer

Torx

"Star key" redirects here. For the key on a telephone keypad, see asterisk § Telephony.

A security Torx L-key and fastener with holes for a safety pin to hinder disassembly with an ordinary Torx key.

Torx (pronounced ) is a trademark for a type of screw drive characterized by a 6-point star-shaped pattern, developed in 1967[1] by Camcar Textron.[2] A popular generic name for the drive is star, as in star screwdriver or star bits. The official generic name, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization as ISO 10664, is hexalobular internal.[3] This is sometimes abbreviated in databases and catalogs as 6lobe (starting with the numeral 6, not the capital letter G). Torx Plus,Torx Paralobe and Torx ttap are improved head profiles.[4]

Torx screws are commonly found on automobiles, motorcycles, bicycle brake systems (disc brakes), hard disk drives, computer systems and consumer electronics. Initially, they were sometimes used in applications requiring tamper resistance, since the drive systems and screwdrivers were not widely available; as drivers became more common, tamper-resistant variants, as described below, were developed.[5] Torx screws are also becoming increasingly popular in construction industries.

Principles of operation[edit]

The angle between the plane of contact between tool and fastener and the circumferentially directed force is much closer to 90° in a Torx type of head (lower) than in a conventional hexhead (upper). (Exaggerated for illustrational purposes)

By design, Torx head screws resist cam-out better than Phillips head or slot head screws.[1] Whereas the tendency of Phillips drivers to cam out under excessive torque has been listed as a feature preventing damage to the screw-head or driver,[6] Torx heads were designed to prevent cam-out. The development of better torque-limiting automatic screwdrivers for use in factories allowed this change. Rather than rely on the tool to slip out of the screw head when a desired torque level is reached (which risks damage to the driver tip, screw head, and/or workpiece), torque-limiting driver designs achieve a desired torque consistently.

The Torx design allows for a higher torque to be exerted than a similarly sized conventional hex socket head without damaging the head and/or the tool.[1] The diagram depicts the interaction between the male and female components of a conventional hex drive and a Torx drive. The clearance between the components is exaggerated for clarity.

The green circle, passing through the six points of contact between the two components, represents the direction of the rotational force being exerted at each of those points. Because the plane of contact is not perpendicular to this circle, a radial force is also generated which tends to "burst" the female component and "crush" the male one. If this radial force component is too great for the material to withstand, it will cause the corners to be rounded off one or both components or will split the sides of the female part. The magnitude of this force is proportional to the cotangent of the angle (depicted in orange) between the green circle and the contact plane.

For the Torx type of design, the angle is much closer to 90° than in the case of the hex head, and so for a given torque the potentially damaging radial force is much lower. This property allows the head of the fastener to be smaller for the same required torque, which can be an advantage in applications where space to accommodate the head is limited.

Sizing[edit]

Torx head sizes are described using the capital letter "T" followed by a number ranging from T1 to T100.[7] But some manufacturers and resellers head sizes are also abbreviated using "TX" or "Tx" in front of the number.[8][9] A smaller number corresponds to a smaller point-to-point dimension of the screw head (diameter of circle circumscribed on the cross-section of the tip of the screw driver). Common sizes include T10, T15, and T25, while T35 and T47 tend to see specialized use. Only the proper driver can drive a specific head size without risk of damaging the driver or screw. The same series of Torx drivers is used to drive SAE, metric and other thread system fasteners, reducing the number of bit sizes required.

The "external" variants of Torx head sizes (see below) are described using the capital letter "E" followed by a number ranging from E4 to E44.[10] The "E" numbers are different from the "T" numbers of the same size: for example, an E4 Torx socket fits a T20 head.[7]

Size Point-to-point distance Maximum torque range ~ E Torx
(in) (mm) (lb·ft) (N·m)
T1 0.035 0.90 0.015–0.022 0.02–0.03
T2 0.039 1.00 0.052–0.066 0.07–0.09
T3 0.047 1.20 0.10–0.13 0.14–0.18
T4 0.053 1.35 0.16–0.21 0.22–0.28
T5 0.059 1.50 0.32–0.38 0.43–0.51 E2
T6 0.069 1.75 0.55–0.66 0.75–0.90
T7 0.083 2.10 1.0–1.3 1.4–1.7
T8 0.094 2.40 1.6–1.9 2.2–2.6
T9 0.102 2.60 2.1–2.5 2.8–3.4
T10 0.110 2.80 2.7–3.3 3.7–4.5
T15 0.132 3.35 4.7–5.7 6.4–7.7
T20 0.156 3.95 7.7–9.4 10.5–12.7 E4
T25 0.177 4.50 11.7–14.0 15.9–19 E5
T27 0.201 5.10 16.6–19.8 22.5–26.9
T30 0.220 5.60 22.9–27.6 31.1–37.4 E6
T35[12]0.232 5.90 E7
T40 0.266 6.75 39.9–48.0 54.1–65.1 E8
T45 0.312 7.93 63.4–76.1 86–103.2
T47[13][14]GM-Style
T50 0.352 8.95 97–117 132–158 E10
T55 0.447 11.35 161–189 218–256 E12
T60 0.530 13.45 280–328 379–445 E16
T70 0.618 15.70 460–520 630–700 E18
T80 0.699 17.75 696–773 943–1,048 E20
T90 0.795 20.20 984–1,094 1,334–1,483
T100 0.882 22.40 1,359–1,511 1,843–2,048 E24

Variants[edit]

  • A version known as Security Torx, Tamper-Resistant Torx (often shortened to Torx TR) or pin-in Torx contains a post in the center of the head that prevents a standard Torx driver (or a straight screwdriver) from being inserted.
  • An External Torx version exists, where the screw head has the shape of a Torx screwdriver bit, and a Torx socket is used to drive it. The external “E” Torx nominal sizing does not correlate to the “T” size, (e.g. an E40 socket is too large to fit a T40 Torx bit, while an E8 Torx socket will fit a T40 Torx bit[7]).
  • Torx Paralobe is a further developed Torx Drive System with 6% longer Flanks which results in a 20% higher applicable torque.[15]
Size Point-to-point distance[7]Standard fastener selection[10]
(in) (mm) SAE Metric
E4 0.15 3.8 #6 M3
E5 0.19 4.7 #8 M4
E6 0.22 5.6 #10 M5
E7 0.24 6.1
E8 0.29 7.4 1/4" M6 & M7
E10 0.37 9.3 5/16" M8
E12 0.44 11.1 3/8" M10 & M11
E14 0.50 12.8 7/16" M12
E16 0.58 14.7 1/2"
E18 0.65 16.6 9/16" M14
E20 0.72 18.4 5/8" M16
E24 0.87 22.1 3/4" M18 & M20
E28 7/8" M22
E32 1" M24 & M27
E36 1-1/8" M30
E40 1-1/4" M33
E44 1-3/8" M36
  • A Torx successor, Torx Plus, was introduced around 1990 when the original Torx patent was expiring. Torx Plus patent expired in 2010.[16] The lobes are more square to allow for higher torque and to minimize wear. The name is shortened to IP (Internal Plus) with sizes ranging from 1IP to 100IP [17] (sometimes listed as IP1 to IP100 [18]) and EP (External Plus) with sizes ranging from 1EP to 42EP as well as smaller sizes ranging from H7EP to H2EP and includes five-lobed tamper-resistant variants.[17] The specifications for these licenses are held by Textron. Standard Torx drivers can be used to drive Torx Plus screws, but not to full torque because of the loose fit. Torx Plus drivers will not fit into standard Torx screws.
    • A tamper-resistant version of Torx Plus exists having five lobes rather than six, plus a solid post in the center, and is used for security as the drivers are uncommon.[19] Though Acument (formerly Textron) lists no designation,[20][21]TS[22] or IPR[23] may be seen. The screw may alternatively be a Pentalobe.
    • Torx Plus Maxx Stems is a highly specialized variant used on the ends of fasteners opposite the bolt-head, and provides higher torque than other drive systems allow.[24] Torxstem is a stud with the Torx Plus Maxx drive on both ends.
  • An improved version of Torx called Torx ttap was developed in 2006www.ttapdrive.com which features a second recess to create a "stick-fit" engagement (named Frixion Fit), designed to minimize wobbling (named Stable Drive) without pressing and the need for magnetic bits, a feature that can be important to certain industrial users.[25] Standard Torx drivers can be used to drive Torx ttap screws, but Torx ttap drivers will not fit standard Torx screws.[26]
  • AudiTorx is a tamper-proof fastener where a convex and smooth fastener head is topped with a break-away Torx drive that snaps off when the engineered torque is reached, leaving a rivet-like bolt head that can't be easily removed. The main application for these fasteners is in the railroad industry.[27]

Competitive variants[edit]

AW drive is a hexalobular-type screw head similar to Torx, with a tapered profile to aid in centering, developed by the Würth Group in Germany.[28] It is available in five sizes: AW 10, AW 20, AW 25, AW 30 and AW 40.[29]

Gallery[edit]

  • Torx bits T15, T20, T25, and T30

  • Closeup of Torx screwdriver tip

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcU.S. Patent 3,584,667, Bernard F. Reiland, "Coupling arrangement and tools for same", filed 1967-03-21
  2. ^ Camcar eventually became part of Textron Fastening Systems in the 1990s. In 2006 Textron Fastening Systems was sold to Platinum Equities, LLC, of Beverly Hills, California. They renamed the company Acument Global Technologies, which as of 2010 includes Avdel, Camcar, Ring Screw, and others. In 2014, Acument was sold from Platinum Equity to Fontana Gruppo.
  3. ^ISO 10664:2005, ISO.org, retrieved 2012-01-14
  4. ^"What is a Torx screw?". Fastener Engineering. 2020-08-12. Retrieved 2021-10-04.
  5. ^Paul Sharke (June 2005). "Fast and Secure: how much proof is tamperproof?". Mechanical Engineering. 127 (6): 32. ISSN 0025-6501. Archived from the original on 2007-02-09. Retrieved 2012-01-14.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  6. ^"US Patent #2,474,994 Claims, Page 7".
  7. ^ abcde"Chart of Torx fasteners and tools". Wiha Tools USA. Archived from the original on 2015-12-26. Retrieved 2012-01-14.
  8. ^"Torx bits".
  9. ^GmbH, Contorion. "Contorion: digitaler Fachhändler für Handwerk und Industrie". www.contorion.at.
  10. ^ ab"TORX Drive System"(PDF). Textron Fastening Systems. Archived from the original(PDF) on 2007-01-02.
  11. ^ISO 10664:2014 - Hexalobular internal driving feature for bolts and screws
  12. ^"2 Pcs T35 3/13 Torx Head Screwdriver Link 1/2 Square Mechanic Drive Socket".
  13. ^"FTX47E, Socket Driver, TORX, GM-Style, T47".
  14. ^"Fiero Torx Sockets".
  15. ^Media, Miller. "TORX® PARALOBE® Drive System | Acument Global Technologies". Retrieved 2019-07-11.
  16. ^[1], "Drive system for prosthetic fasteners", issued 1990-02-13 
  17. ^ ab"TORX PLUS Drive System"(PDF). Acument.
  18. ^"TORX PLUS Long arm L-Keys". Wiha Tools USA. Archived from the original on 7 October 2015. Retrieved 14 July 2016.
  19. ^Egon Pavlis (16 March 2010). "When a Phillips is not a Phillips Plus So Much More!". Instructables.
  20. ^"Fastening Solutions"(PDF). Acument.
  21. ^"Tamper-Resistant TORX PLUS Drive System"(PDF). Textron Fastening Systems. Archived from the original(PDF) on 2006-11-10.
  22. ^"TS Star Bits (5 Sided) 1/4"D 7pc - Part No. 3389 - Part of the TS Star/Torx* Plus range from Laser Tools". Retrieved 14 July 2016.
  23. ^"Security TORX PLUS Insert Bits". Wiha Tools USA. Archived from the original on 13 December 2015. Retrieved 14 July 2016.
  24. ^"TORX PLUS® MAXX Drive System".
  25. ^"TTAP Fastener". Acument Global Technologies. Retrieved 26 February 2017.
  26. ^"Torx ttap Advantages". Ttapdrive.com. Ttapdrive AS. Retrieved 26 February 2017.
  27. ^"Acument Industrial fastening systems".
  28. ^"Technical Information on Fasteners: Design recommendations 11.1 Inside drives for screws – AW drive (AW-Antrieb)"(PDF). Adolf Würth GmbH & Co. KG. Retrieved 2 March 2017.
  29. ^"Construction Range Overview (Fasteners: Introducing the AW Drive System, p. 3)"(PDF). Würth New Zealand. 2016.

External links[edit]

  • Media related to Torx at Wikimedia Commons
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torx

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