M1 macbook ports

M1 macbook ports DEFAULT

Identify the ports on your Mac

If you're not sure which port to use with your external display, hard drive, camera, printer, iPhone, iPad, or other device, the port shapes and symbols in this guide should help. 

Information about these and other types of Mac ports is in the specifications for your Mac: Choose Apple menu  > About This Mac, click Support, then click Specifications. Or check your Mac user guide.

Thunderbolt / USB 4

These Mac models have Thunderbolt / USB 4 ports:

You can connect a single external display and other devices that connect using either a Thunderbolt 3  cable or USB-C cable. You can also connect a USB-C charge cable to charge your notebook, or a USB-C to Lightning cable to charge your iPhone or iPad. If you have a device that doesn't connect to this port, you might be able to use an adapter to connect it.

2021 iMac rear with ports enlarged

On iMac (24-inch, M1, 2021), the  symbol appears above each Thunderbolt / USB 4 port. To connect a display, use either of the ports with the Thunderbolt symbol .

Thunderbolt 3

These Mac models have Thunderbolt 3 ports:

  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2020)
  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2019)
  • iMac (Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, 2019)
  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2017)
  • iMac (Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, 2017)
  • iMac (21.5-inch, 2017)
  • iMac Pro
  • Mac Pro (2019)
  • Mac Pro (Rack, 2019)
  • Mac mini (2018)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2020)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2019)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2018)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2019)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2019)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2018)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2018, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2017)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)

Use these ports with displays and other devices that connect using either a Thunderbolt 3  cable or USB-C cable. You can also connect a USB-C power adapter and cable to charge your notebook computer. If you have a device that doesn't connect to this port, you might be able to use an adapter to connect it.


If your Mac notebook or desktop computer has more than one port like this, each port supports Thunderbolt 3 and USB-C.
 

USB 3

These Mac models have USB 3 ports:

  • iMac (24-inch, M1, 2021) with four ports
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, 2017)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2016)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015)

On MacBook, use this port with displays and other devices that connect using a USB-C cable. You can also connect a USB-C power adapter and cable to charge your notebook computer. If you have a device that doesn't connect to this port, you might be able to use an adapter to connect it.

On iMac (four-port model only), use the USB 3 ports with external devices that connect using a USB-C cable. To connect an external display, use either of the ports with the Thunderbolt symbol .

Thunderbolt

These Mac models have Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 ports:

  • MacBook Pro introduced in 2011 through 2015
  • MacBook Air introduced in 2011 through 2017
  • Mac mini introduced in 2011 through 2014
  • iMac introduced in 2011 through 2015
  • Mac Pro introduced in 2013

Use these ports with displays and other devices that connect using a Thunderbolt  cable.

Thunderbolt and Thunderbolt 2 are not the same as Mini DisplayPort. They have the same shape, but use different symbols on the cable and port. However, this port does support Mini DisplayPort for video output, so you can use a Mini DisplayPort cable to connect a Mini DisplayPort display.
   

Mini DisplayPort

These Mac models have Mini DisplayPort:

  • MacBook Pro introduced in late 2008 through 2010
  • MacBook Air introduced in late 2008 through 2010
  • Mac mini introduced in 2009 and 2010
  • iMac introduced in 2009 and 2010
  • Mac Pro introduced in 2009 through 2012

Use this port with displays that connect using a Mini DisplayPort  cable.

Mini DisplayPort is not the same as Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 . They have the same shape, but use different symbols on the cable and port.
  

USB-A

Use these ports with devices that connect using a USB-A  cable. USB ports are sometimes known by the USB specification of the port, such as USB 2 or USB 3. 

  


Left to right: power, two Thunderbolt, USB-A, and Audio-Out.
 

Ethernet

Use Ethernet  with networks and devices that connect using an Ethernet (RJ45) cable.

On some iMac models, the Ethernet port is located on the computer's power adapter. If your power adapter doesn't have an Ethernet port, you can use an Ethernet adapter.

FireWire


FireWire 400

FireWire 800

Use FireWire  with devices that connect using a FireWire 400 or FireWire 800 cable.
  

SD card

Use the SD card slot with SD, SDHC, SDXC, MMC, and UHS-II media cards, such as those used by digital cameras.
  

Audio

Use Audio-Out —  or  — with headphones, speakers, and other audio-output devices that connect using an audio cable that has a 3.5 mm (1/8 inch) audio jack. 

Use Audio-In  with a microphone or other audio-input device that connects using an audio cable that has a 3.5 mm (1/8 inch) audio jack.

 

Information about products not manufactured by Apple, or independent websites not controlled or tested by Apple, is provided without recommendation or endorsement. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the selection, performance, or use of third-party websites or products. Apple makes no representations regarding third-party website accuracy or reliability. Contact the vendor for additional information.

Published Date: 

Sours: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201736

A new MacBook Pro comes with either two or four external ports, depending on the model you pick. A new MacBook Air has a pair of ports. But those MacBook ports are only of one type: Thunderbolt, which is compatible with USB-C. A 24-inch iMac comes with two Thunderbolt/USB 4 ports; some models also include two USB-C ports. You probably have devices that use USB-A, Thunderbolt 1, Thunderbolt 2, DisplayPort, HDMI, or something else. How do you connect these devices? With an adapter.

If you’re planning to buy a new 24-inch iMac, MacBook Pro, or MacBook Air, make sure you set aside a considerable amount of cash for the adapters you need. Apple doesn’t include any in the box, except for a power adapter.

Your best bet is to get a combination dock, like the Satechi Slim Aluminum Type-C Multi-Port Adapter ($60 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). It connects via USB-C, and includes a USB-C pass-through port, two USB 3.0 ports, and an HDMI port with 4K (30Hz) support. With this, you don’t have to carry around multiple adapters.

If you don’t want a dock, or you can’t find a dock with the mix of connections you need, Apple or another company probably has an adapter for you. We’ve come up with this guide to help you sort out what you need, and we link to the appropriate adapter in the online Apple Store or on Amazon.

Be sure to check the return policies; sometimes adapters from third-parties don’t work. Read user reviews whenever possible, and read the specifications to make sure the adapter can do what you need it to do.

If there’s a connection we missed, or you have advice on what adapters to buy, let us know on Twitter or Facebook.

How to connect USB-C devices

The Thunderbolt ports in the current 24-inch iMac, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air work with USB-C devices, which have the same connector shape. If you want to use a USB-C device, you can just plug it into one of the Thunderbolt ports. No adapter necessary. Whew.

How to connect USB-A devices

USB-A is the USB connector with which you’re probably most familiar. It’s the USB connector that was on the previous MacBooks. (Terms like USB 4, USB 3 and USB 2 refer to the speed at which data travels through the connector.)

You can get a dock, like the before-mentioned Satechi. Or you can get Apple’s $19 USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link.

Apple USB-C to USB Adapter

Apple

If you need to connect multiple USB-A devices, get a USB-C to USB-A hub. Anker sells a USB-C to 4-Port USB 3.0 HubEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link ($25 on Amazon) that provides four USB-A ports. 

How to connect micro B SuperSpeed devices

This connector is often used with external storage devices. You’ll need a new cable, like the $15 StarTech USB C to Micro USB CableEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link. 

The name of the cable is confusing, because it could be mistaken for micro USB. But if you check the product page on StarTech’s website, you can see a clear shot of the micro B SuperSpeed connector on the cable, which is quite different from micro USB.

How to connect an iPhone or iPad

For the iPhone and iPad, if you are still using the USB-A to Lightning (or 30-pin if you’re using an older device) cable that came with your device, you can get the USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link mentioned above in the USB-A section.

Don’t want an adapter? Buy a $19 Lightning to USB-C CableEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link (1m). You can also get a 2-meter version for $29.

More recent iPhones and iPads include a USB-C to Lightning cable, and the iPad Pro includes a USB-C charging cable, so you don’t need the adapter for those devices.

How to connect the Lightning EarPods

There’s now a USB-C to Lightning adapter, thanks to the folks at Anker. It’s $25 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link.Remove non-product link This adapter has a female Lightning connector on one end, so you can plug in your Lightning earphones. The other side is a standard USB-C connector that you plug into your MacBook or 24-inch iMac.

anker usbc lightning audio

How to connect headphones with a 3.5mm headphone plug

You’re in luck. The MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, and 24-inch iMac have a 3.5mm headphone jack. Just plug it in and you’re good to go. That was easy.

macbookpro 13 tbolt3 ports

Now, say you need a second headphone jack. You can use a splitter, like the Belkin Speaker and Headphone 3.5 mm AUX Audio Cable Splitter ($5 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). The $12 Belkin RockStar 5-Jack Multi Headphone Audio SplitterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link plugs into the headphone jack and adds five jacks.

How to connect Thunderbolt 1 and Thunderbolt 2 devices

Older versions of Thunderbolt have a different connector than the Thunderbolt connector on the current MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, and 24-inch iMac. The adapter you need is Apple’s $49 Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link.

Thunderbolt 3 USB-C to Thunderbolt 2 Adapter

Apple

How to connect an external display

This one can eat up a chunk of your budget, because there are so many different types of display connectors. Be prepared to buy several adapters.

DisplayPort and mini DisplayPort

To connect to a DisplayPort display, you need a USB-C to DisplayPort cable or adapter. Amazon sells the Cable Matters USB-C to DisplayPort Adapter cableEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link for $18, and it supports 4K video at 60Hz.

To connect a display with mini DisplayPort, you need an adapter like the Answin USB C to Mini DisplayPort adapter ($18 on AmazonRemove product link).

HDMI

Apple offers the USB-C Digital AV Multiport AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link, a $69 device that also provides a USB-A port and a USB-C port that’s for charging only. Be warned: Apple released a new version of this adapter (model number A2119) in August 2019 that supports HDMI 2.0. The older version (model number A1621) supports HDMI 1.4. When shopping, check the model number (at an Apple store, you likely will get the new model). Apple has a support document that details the differences between the two adapters.

apple-usb-c-digital-av-multiport-adapter

Apple

If you don’t want to spend that much, you can get an adapter that’s just a USB-C to HDMI adapter, such as Anker’s USB-C to HDMI Adapter ($17 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). We really like the Nonda USB-C to HDMI Adapter ($18 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). When shopping for such adapters, look out for at least 1080p support. The Nonda adapter has 4K video support.

DVI

Cable Matters has a 6-foot USB-C to DVI Adapter ($20 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). They also sell 3-foot ($19) and 10-foot ($23) versions.

VGA

To connect a VGA display, Apple has a USB-C VGA Multiport Adapter ($66 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). In addition to a VGA to USB-C connection, it also provides a USB-A port for connecting a USB device, and a USB-C charging port to keep your laptop battery happy.

On the more affordable side but without the USB ports is the Benfei USB-C to VGA Adapter, which is available on Amazon for $13Edit non-product linkRemove non-product link. 

How to connect to ethernet

You’ll probably use Wi-Fi most of the time, but using an ethernet connection has its advantages. To connect to an ethernet network, you need an adapter like the Belkin USB-C to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter, which is available on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link for $27.

belkin usbc ethernet adapter

How to connect SD cards

If you use a DLSR or other type of stand-alone camera, it might have a way to transfer your files wirelessly. If not, you need an adapter to access the SD card, like the Cable Matters Dual Slot USB C Card Reader ($10 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link).

cable matters dual slot usb c card reader

If you have a USB-A card reader, you can try using the Apple’s $19 USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link, or get a USB-C dock.

How to connect FireWire devices

If you have a FireWire to USB-A cable, you can try using Apple’s $19 USB-C to USB Adapter. If you have a device with a FireWire 1394 4-pin connector—it was commonly used on video cameras and looks like this—and you need a way to connect, you can try using a USB-A to FireWire 1394 4-pin cable ($8 on Amazon) with the Apple’s USB-C to USB Adapter.

Trying to connect FireWire 400 and 800 devices gets iffy. Apple has a Thunderbolt to FireWire AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link for $29, but it has a older Thunderbolt connector that doesn’t plug into the Thunderbolt port on a new MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, or 24-inch iMac.

apple thunderbolt to firewire adapter

Apple

You could try daisy-chaining adapters, but that’s always risky and may not work, not to mention potentially bad for the adapters. Plug the Thunderbolt to FireWire Adapter into Apple’s $49 Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link and then plug that into the Mac.

How to connect a printer with USB-B

Many printers nowadays have wireless support, so there’s no need for a cable. But maybe you have an older printer, or you find wireless printing unreliable. Most consumer printers have a USB-B port. It’s a squarish connector, much different from USB-A or USB-C.

You need a cable like the Cable Matters USB C Printer Cable, which has a USB-C to USB-B connection. A 1 meter cable is $7Edit non-product linkRemove non-product link; other lengths are available.

cable matters usbc usbb cable

If you already have a USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link, you can take the USB-A to USB-B cable that came with your printer and plug it into the adapter. Then you plug the adapter into the laptop.

How to add a classic MagSafe power connector to the MacBook Air or MacBook Pro

The power adapter that comes with the new MacBook Pro and MacBook Air doesn’t have a breakaway MagSafe connector. MagSafe was a laptop lifesaver in instances where someone tripped over the power cable.

But you can still add a MagSafe connector. Tesha’s USB C Magnetic Charger Charging Cable  ($20 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link) is a power-only cable that has an adapter that acts like a MagSafe connector. It is available in silver or black.

Sours: https://www.macworld.com/article/229045/thunderbolt-3-adapter-m1-imac-macbook-pro-mac-mini-usb-displayport-hdmi-ethernet.html
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Hyper claims its new USB-C hubs will address one of the key frustrations with Apple’s M1 MacBooks: their inability to natively power more than one external display at a time. Both Hyper’s $129.99 “HyperDrive Dual 4K HDMI 3-in-1 USB-C Adapter” and its $199.99 “HyperDrive Dual 4K HDMI 10-in-1 USB-C Hub” have two HDMI ports, which it says can output to two 4K monitors without the need for software drivers. They’re both launching today and are available to buy direct from Hyper.

Neither offers a perfect solution. Hyper notes that both hubs are only able to output a 60Hz signal to one 4K display, while the other will be limited to 30Hz. But it’s more convenient than the kinds of existing workarounds outlined in this guide from MacWorld, which require downloading a third-party driver to the Mac. Even then, some dock manufacturers like Plugable and Caldigit warn that this setup isn’t officially supported, and the latter even actively recommends using its products in this way.

Image: Hyper
Image: Hyper

As well as running two 4K displays, both of Hyper’s accessories also support 100W USB-C Power Delivery pass through. The 10-in-1 hub also has a range of other ports, including a USB-C data port, two USB-A ports, gigabit Ethernet, SD card slots, and a 3.5mm headphone jack. In addition to M1 MacBooks, Hyper says the hubs also work with other compatible USB-C devices, like Intel-powered MacBooks, Windows PCs, and Chromebooks.

It’s unfortunate that such an expensive dock is needed to overcome the M1 MacBooks’ limitation in the first place. Here’s hoping Apple’s rumored 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pros won’t suffer from this same limitation.

Sours: https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/12/22722192/hyperdrive-usb-c-docks-mackbook-m1-price
M1 Mac's 2 ports VS 4 Port Macbook Pro! THE TRUTH!

TODAY'S BEST DEALS

Two-minute review

Voted Best Laptop for Creatives at the TechRadar Choice Awards 2021

The MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) is a watershed moment for Apple’s Pro line. That’s because, along with the MacBook Air (M1, 2020) and the Mac mini (M1, 2020) that launched at the same time, it has moved Apple into a new era. Instead of using Intel CPUs that have powered all of the company’s computers for a while now, it uses the new Apple-made M1 chip. This upgrade to the laptop line is the first truly big leap that it has seen in a long time.

That’s not to say that it looks all that different from previous models. In fact, as big of a change as the M1 chip is, it’s the only big upgrade the Pro 13-inch gets. If you have a 2019 or even an early 2020 model, for instance, you’ll probably want to wait a few generations before getting a Pro with an M1 chip. However, it’s still a big update. This new model is 2.8 times faster than its predecessor and has a better battery life to boot. Additionally, it’s three times faster than comparable Windows laptops.

Though we would have loved to see an additional port or two and a design update, the new MacBook Pro 13-inch is a fantastic update for Apple’s top line of portables. Apple has yet again redefined what we can expect from a laptop.

Price and availability

Prices for the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) start at $1,299 / £1,299 / AU$1,999 for the 256GB SSD/8GB RAM model, with the 2TB SSD/16GB RAM model selling for $2,299 / £2,299 / AU$3,499.

Both models come with the same M1 chip with an 8-core CPU and 8-core GPU, and storage can be configured up to 2TB.

For comparison, the MacBook Pro (2020) launched earlier this year for $1,299 / £1,299 / AU$1,999, so we're not seeing the price cut on the MacBook Pro some were hoping to see now that Apple has moved to its own silicon, but we commend Apple for releasing the new version at the same price as the previous model.

What’s interesting is that the new MacBook Air (M1, 2020) is available with the same M1 chip, and with the same amount of RAM and 512GB storage, for $1,249 / £1,249 / AU$1,949. Usually, we wouldn't compare the MacBook Pro with the MacBook Air, but considering how close the specs are, and the fact that new MacBook Air also features a screen that supports the P3 color gamut, previously exclusive to MacBook Pros, there may be some people who think going for the Air is a better choice, especially as it comes with double the capacity for less money.

However, the MacBook Air (M1, 2020) has a fanless design, whereas the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) still has fans. This means the new MacBook Air is limited in how long it can run intensive tasks for before its performance is throttled in order to prevent overheating, due to there being no fans to cool it down. 

If you’re going to have your machine working for hours on end on rendering tasks, for example, then the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) will be worth the extra outlay.

Spec Sheet

Here is the 13-inch MacBook Pro (M1, 2020) configuration sent to TechRadar for review:

CPU: Apple M1 (8-core)
Graphics: Integrated 8-core GPU
RAM: 8GB Unified PDDR4X-4266 MHz SDRAM
Screen: 13.3-inch, 2,560 x 1,600 Retina display (backlit LED, IPS, 500 nits brightness, wide color P3 gamut)
Storage: 256GB SSD
Ports: 2x Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C), 3.5mm headphone jack
Connectivity: Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth 5.0
Camera: 720p FaceTime HD webcam
Weight: 3.0 pounds (1.4kg)
Size: 11.97 x 8.36 x 0.61 inches (30.41 x 21.24 x 1.56cm; W x D x H)

Design

The MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) is one of the most exciting releases from Apple for a while, thanks to its new M1 silicon brains, but you probably wouldn’t think that when you first get it out of the box.

That’s because, with its dimensions of 0.61 x 11.97 x 8.36 inches (1.56 x 30.41 x 21.24cm) and a weight of 3.0 pounds (1.4kg) it's pretty much the same as the previous model. It certainly looks and feels identical to previous MacBook Pro 13-inch models, so anyone hoping for a radical new look to match the radical new hardware within is going to be disappointed.

We feel that this is a bit of a missed opportunity for Apple. It’s made a big deal of what a revolutionary change its move to the M1 chip is, along with macOS Big Sur – which is a big enough change to warrant naming it ‘macOS 11’, and not ‘macOS 10.17' – so we’d have like to see Apple be just as bold with the look of the MacBook Pro 13-inch.

Apple would probably argue, along with some of its fans, that the MacBook Pro 13-inch’s design is perfect, so there’s no point changing it. In a way that’s fair – this is still a good-looking laptop after all, and it remains impressively thin and light; but when Apple's rivals, such as Dell and HP, are doing some innovative things with their designs, be it super-slim bezels or 2-in-1 designs that let you use the laptop like a tablet, the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020)’s look starts to feel a little dated.

For a while now, many people felt that Apple had neglected the Mac and MacBook in favor of the iPhone. After all, could you imagine Apple sticking with the same iPhone design since 2016? That’s pretty much what it has done with the MacBook Pro 13-inch, barring a few tweaks.

It’s a bit of a shame, as in other respects – the revolutionary M1 chip and the improvements the company has brought to macOS Big Sur – it does feel like Apple is excited about MacBooks again.

Still, for the purpose of this MacBook review, the design of the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) isn’t bad by any means, just rather familiar – and that sense of familiarity is maintained when you open the laptop. The TouchBar returns – if you’re not familiar with this, it’s a thin touchscreen that runs along the top of the keyboard, and which shows context-sensitive buttons and shortcuts depending on what app or tool you’re currently using.

When it first appeared four years ago, opinion was divided as how useful it was, but over the years we’ve found ourselves warming to it, and as more third-party applications have added TouchBar functionality it’s become more useful. It’s good to see it back, and it shows that Apple’s move to the M1 chip and macOS Big Sur hasn’t caused it to ditch this feature. The escape key on the left is once again separate, rather than being included in the TouchBar, which was a request of many people who use the key a lot (such as developers).

The keyboard is the same Magic Keyboard as the one introduced with the MacBook Pro 13-inch from earlier this year. This was a welcome change at the time, as it replaced the controversial Butterfly switch keyboard, which was often prone to reliability problems. It’s good to see it back in the new MacBook Pro 13-inch, and it again feels great to type on.

The screen is also unchanged, with a Retina resolution of 2560 x 1600. This results in a sharp image, but again Apple is being outclassed here by rivals such as HP and Dell, who are putting higher-resolution screens on their 13-inch laptops.

Still, the screen of the Apple MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) remains bright and vibrant. It also supports the P3 wide color gamut, offering excellent color reproduction – this is great for photographers and video editors, who need true-to-life colors, but it’s worth pointing out that the new MacBook Air (M1, 2020) also now comes with P3 wide color support. This makes the more affordable MacBook Air a viable alternative for budget-conscious creatives, and deprives the MacBook Pro of a key selling point.

When it comes to ports, the Apple MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) sticks with just the two Thunderbolt 3 ports (both on the left-hand side), and an audio jack on the right.

While we're glad that Apple's move away from Intel hasn't meant losing Thunderbolt 3 (it's an Intel product, after all), this lack of ports continues to be a bit of a pain point for professionals. If you want to copy photos from a memory card, or use peripherals that rely on the older USB-A ports, then you're going to need to buy a dongle. While Dell includes one in many of its USB-C only laptops, Apple doesn't.

Benchmarks

Here’s how the 13-inch MacBook Pro (M1, 2020) performed in our suite of benchmark tests:

Cinebench R23 CPU: Single-Core: 1,491; Multi-core: 7,768
Geekbench 5 Single-Core: 1,732; Multi-Core: 7,590
Battery Life (TechRadar movie test): 13 hours and 22 minutes

Performance

In our time with the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) we were been impressed by its performance. Apple talked a big game about the M1 chip, and claims that its CPU is 2.8 times faster at building Xcode projects, and delivers twice as fast vector performance in Affinity Photo, plus 5.9 times the 3D title render speeds in Final Cut Pro and 2.9 times the performance in Shadow of the Tomb Raider thanks to its GPU.

For a fair MacBook review, we had to take these claims with a hefty dose of salt, as Apple is a bit vague about some of its tests, and when it comes to GPU performance it’s comparing this to a base MacBook Pro 13-inch from the previous generation, which uses an older 8th-generation Intel processor with integrated graphics.

Now that we've had the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) for a while, we can delve deeper into its performance. We ran both native M1 apps and older legacy apps designed for Intel Macs, and they performed really well. We opened up several demanding apps at once, and swapped between them, and throughout macOS Big Sur didn't miss a beat. They opened quickly, and switching between them was almost instantaneous.

As we said in our MacBook Air (M1, 2020) review, the fact that Apple has switched to an ARM-based chip, but via its Rosetta tool allows you to continue to run older apps without any major issues, is commendable. Microsoft has a version of Windows 10 that runs on ARM-based laptops like its own Surface Pro X, but it's limited to only being able to run apps from the Microsoft Store that have been built for ARM architecture – and that means many popular apps just don’t work on Windows 10 on ARM.

The fact that Apple is not only ensuring that pretty much all older Mac apps work on the M1-toting MacBook Pro 13-inch, but also thousands of iOS apps as well, really highlights what a poor effort Microsoft has made with Windows 10 on ARM. It needs to seriously up its game.

Unlike the new MacBook Air (M1, 2020), which runs silently thanks to its fanless design, the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) does still have fans, and they do kick in after a while when you're doing some strenuous work on the device. The laptop also gets rather warm towards the back at times. However, the fans don't ever get too distracting, and for day to day use you'll never hear them.

The fact that the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) has fans means it can work harder and longer than the MacBook Air (M1, 2020) as well. Due to its fanless design, the new MacBook Air has to throttle performance (by lowering the speed of the M1 chip) to avoid overheating.  This makes the Pro the better choice for professionals that are using it for prolonged intensive tasks, such as rendering complex 3D animations.

The benchmark results were also incredibly impressive. We'd seen leaked Cinebench scores suggesting that the M1 chip can beat powerful Intel 11th gen chips, and it proved to be correct. In the intensive Cinebench R23 benchmark, the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) scored a whopping 7, 768 points in the multi-core test. That puts it well above the performance of the entry level MacBook Pro 16-inch with a six-core 9th generation Intel Core i7 processor. The fact that the laptop sells for $2,399 (£2,399 / AU$3,799), which is around $1,000/£1,000 more, and has a dedicated graphics card, casts the cheaper MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020)'s performance in a very positive light.

The Geekbench 5 results also show what a big improvement the M1 chip is compared to the previous model with a 2.0GHz Intel Core i5-1038NG7 quad-core processor. Scoring 1,732 in the single-core tests, and 7,590 in the multi-core tests, it roundly beats the earlier model, which scored 1,268 and 4,490 in the same tests. The extra four cores of the M1's CPU (it's an octa-core chip) are obviously doing some heavy lifting here.

We also had a play around with Final Cut Pro, Apple's video editing software which has been updated to run on the M1 chip, and used it to editing an 8K video using multiple sources. The MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) kept up admirably, allowing us to scrub through the footage while showing a preview of the video at the same time. It was seriously impressive. The app did crash once on us, however, when we were adding some titles and fancy effects, but that appeared to be a one off. 

On the whole, the video editing performance of the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) was remarkable, with 8K video editing a possibility with the M1's GPU.

Battery life

Apple claims that the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) has the "longest battery life ever in a Mac", promising a huge 17 hours of wireless web browsing, and up to 20 hours of video playback – a whopping 10 hours more than the previous model.

Again, these are big claims from Apple, and by its very nature you’re going to be using the MacBook Pro 13-inch for more intensive tasks than that, but we’ve usually found Apple’s battery claims to be pretty on the mark. 

In our battery life benchmark test, the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) lasted 13 hours and 22 minutes. During this test we play a looped 1080p video with the screen at 50% brightness until the battery dies. Now, while that isn't quite as long as the 20 hours Apple was claiming, it's still a very impressive score, and a decent improvement over the earlier 2020 Intel model, which lasted 8 hours and 31 minutes in the same test.

That around a 5 hour bump - seriously impressive. It's also longer than the MacBook Pro 16-inch's record of 11 hours and 41 minutes, and also beats the latest Dell XPS 13 model, which scored 11 hours.

The battery life of the Apple MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) is so impressive, that we were actually able to use it straight out of the box, and didn't plug it in for a couple of days later. This was doing a bit of light use - browsing the web and writing emails - so when it comes to much more intensive tasks, that battery life is going to deplete faster. Still, this is very impressive.

Buy it if...

You want a powerful (and small) MacBook
The MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) has had an impressive power boost thanks to the new M1 chip. It's genuinely quite exciting what Apple has achieved here. 

You want excellent battery life
Normally powerful laptops have to make do with short battery lives, but the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) manages to balance performance with a battery life that can last well beyond the whole work day.

You want to edit ultra-high definition videos
The performance of the MacBook Pro 13-inch (M1, 2020) is good enough to easily handle 4K - and even 8K - videos. This is impressive stuff.

Don't buy it if...

You're on a budget
While the MacBook Pro 13-inch is the most affordable MacBook Pro, it's still very expensive. Meanwhile, the new MacBook Air (M1, 2020), offers similar performance in many areas, for quite a bit less.

You want a graphical powerhouse
While the 13-inch MacBook Pro is no slouch in the performance department, it still relies on integrated graphics, which means it's not great at seriously intensive graphical tasks.

You don't like Apple's designs
Once again, Apple hasn't made any big changes to the overall design of the MacBook Pro 13-inch. It's now been a few years, and if you didn't like how it looked before, this won't change your mind.

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Sours: https://www.techradar.com/reviews/apple-macbook-pro-13-inch-m1-2020

Macbook ports m1

MacBook Pro (13-inch, M1, 2020) - Technical Specifications

Finish 

Display 

  • Retina display
  • 13.3-inch (diagonal) LED-backlit display with IPS technology; 2560-by-1600 native resolution at 227 pixels per inch with support for millions of colors
  • Supported scaled resolutions:  
    • 1680 by 1050
    • 1440 by 900
    • 1024 by 640
  • 500 nits brightness
  • Wide color (P3)
  • True Tone technology

Chip

  • Apple M1 chip
    8-core CPU with 4 performance cores and 4 efficiency cores
    8-core GPU
    16-core Neural Engine

Battery and Power1

  • Up to 17 hours wireless web
  • Up to 20 hours Apple TV app movie playback
  • Built-in 58.2-watt-hour lithium-polymer battery
  • 61W USB-C Power Adapter

Memory

  • 8GB
    8GB unified memory
    Configurable to: 16GB

Storage2 

  • 256GB SSD
    Configurable to 512GB SSD, 1TB, or 2TB SSD

Charging and Expansion 

Two Thunderbolt / USB 4 ports with support for:

  • Charging
  • DisplayPort
  • Thunderbolt 3 (up to 40Gb/s)
  • USB 4 (up to 40Gb/s)
  • USB 3.1 Gen 2 (up to 10Gb/s)
  • Headphone

Keyboard and Trackpad 

  • Backlit Magic Keyboard with:  
    • 65 (U.S.) or 66 (ISO) keys including 4 arrow keys in an inverted‑T arrangement
    • Touch Bar
    • Touch ID sensor
    • Ambient light sensor
    • Force Touch trackpad for precise cursor control and pressure‑sensing capabilities; enables Force clicks, accelerators, pressure‑sensitive drawing, and Multi‑Touch gestures

Wireless 

  • Wi-Fi
    802.11ax Wi-Fi 6 wireless networking
    IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n/ac compatible
  • Bluetooth
    Bluetooth 5.0 wireless technology

Camera 

Video Support 

Simultaneously supports full native resolution on the built-in display at millions of colors and: 

  • One external display with up to 6K resolution at 60Hz

Thunderbolt 3 digital video output 

  • Native DisplayPort output over USB‑C
  • VGA, HDMI, DVI, and Thunderbolt 2 output supported using adapters (sold separately)

Audio 

  • Stereo speakers with high dynamic range
  • Wide stereo sound
  • Support for Dolby Atmos playback
  • Studio-quality three-mic array with directional beamforming
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack

Operating Requirements 

  • Line voltage: 100V to 240V AC
  • Frequency: 50Hz to 60Hz
  • Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)
  • Storage temperature: -13° to 113° F (-25° to 45° C)
  • Relative humidity: 0% to 90% noncondensing
  • Operating altitude: tested up to 10,000 feet
  • Maximum storage altitude: 15,000 feet
  • Maximum shipping altitude: 35,000 feet

Size and Weight 

  • Height: 0.61 inch (1.56 cm)
  • Width: 11.97 inches (30.41 cm)
  • Depth: 8.36 inches (21.24 cm)
  • Weight: 3.0 pounds (1.4 kg)3

Operating System 

macOS
macOS is the most advanced desktop operating system in the world. macOS Big Sur introduces a bold new design and major updates to apps — taking macOS to a new level of power and beauty. Learn more about latest operating system

Accessibility 

Accessibility features help people with disabilities get the most out of their new MacBook Pro. With built-in support for vision, hearing, mobility, and learning, you can create and do amazing things. Learn more about Accessibility 

Features include: 

  • Voice Control
  • VoiceOver
  • Zoom
  • Increase Contrast
  • Reduce Motion
  • Siri and Dictation
  • Switch Control
  • Closed Captions
  • Text to Speech

Built-in Apps4 

  • Photos
  • iMovie
  • GarageBand
  • Pages
  • Numbers
  • Keynote
  • Siri
  • Safari
  • Mail
  • FaceTime
  • Messages
  • Maps
  • News
  • Stocks
  • Home
  • Voice Memos
  • Notes
  • Calendar
  • Contacts
  • Reminders
  • Photo Booth
  • Preview
  • Music
  • Podcasts
  • TV
  • Books
  • App Store
  • Time Machine
  • Find My
  • QuickTime Player

In the Box 

  • 13-inch MacBook Pro
  • 61W USB-C Power Adapter
  • USB-C Charge Cable (2 m)

Configure to Order 

Configure your MacBook Pro with these options, only at apple.com: 

  • 16GB unified memory
  • 512GB, 1TB, or 2TB SSD

MacBook Pro and the Environment 

The 13-inch MacBook Pro is designed with the following features to reduce its environmental impact:See the 13-inch MacBook Pro Product Environmental Report

Made with better materials 

  • 100% recycled tin in the solder of the main logic board
  • Enclosure made with recyclable, low-carbon aluminum
  • 35% or more recycled plastic in multiple components

Energy efficient 

  • ENERGY STAR® certified6

Smarter chemistry7

  • Arsenic-free display glass
  • Mercury-free
  • BFR-, PVC-, and beryllium-free

Green manufacturing 

  • Apple’s Zero Waste Program helps suppliers eliminate waste sent to landfill
  • All final assembly supplier sites are transitioning to 100% renewable energy for Apple production

Responsible packaging 

  • 100% of virgin wood fiber comes from responsibly managed forests
  • Recyclable, majority-fiber packaging

Apple and the Environment
We’re committed to making our products without taking from the earth, and to become carbon neutral across our entire business, including products, by 2030. See Apple’s commitment

Acoustic Performance 

Declared noise emission values in accordance with ECMA-109 

 Sound Power Level
L W A,m (B)
Sound Pressure Level
Operator Position
L p A,m (dB)
Idle1.3 (K V = 0.3)4
Wireless web1.3 (K V = 0.3)4
  1. L W A,m is the mean A-weighted sound power level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 B.
  2. L p A,m is the mean A-weighted sound pressure level measured at operator position (rounded to the nearest 1 dB).
  3. 1 B (bel) = 10 dB (decibel)
  4. K v is the statistical adder for computing upper-limit of A-weighted sound power level.
  5. The quantity, L W A,c (formerly called L W Ad) may be computed from the sum of L W A,m and K v .
  6. The Wireless web test browses 25 popular websites.
  7. Configuration tested: Apple M1 chip, 8GB memory, 512GB storage.

  1. MacBook Pro with Apple M1 chip: Testing conducted by Apple in October 2020 using preproduction 13-inch MacBook Pro systems with Apple M1 chip, 8GB of RAM, and 512GB SSD. The wireless web test measures battery life by wirelessly browsing 25 popular websites with display brightness set to 8 clicks from bottom. The Apple TV app movie playback test measures battery life by playing back HD 1080p content with display brightness set to 8 clicks from bottom. MacBook Pro with Intel Core processor: Testing conducted by Apple in April 2020 using preproduction 1.4GHz quad-core Intel Core i5-based 13-inch MacBook Pro systems with 8GB of RAM and 256GB SSD; and preproduction 2.0GHz quad-core Intel Core i5-based 13-inch MacBook Pro systems with 16GB of RAM and 1TB SSD. The wireless web test measures battery life by wirelessly browsing 25 popular websites with display brightness set to 12 clicks from bottom or 75%. The Apple TV app movie playback test measures battery life by playing back HD 1080p content with display brightness set to 12 clicks from bottom or 75%. The standby test measures battery life by allowing a system, connected to a wireless network and signed in to an iCloud account, to enter standby mode with Safari and Mail applications launched and all system settings left at default. Battery life varies by use and configuration. See apple.com/batteries for more information.
  2. 1GB = 1 billion bytes and 1TB = 1 trillion bytes; actual formatted capacity less.
  3. Weight varies by configuration and manufacturing process.
  4. iMovie, GarageBand, Pages, Numbers, and Keynote are available on the Mac App Store. Downloading apps requires an Apple ID and a device that is compatible with the OS version required for each app.
  5. Data accurate as of product launch.
  6. ENERGY STAR and the ENERGY STAR mark are registered trademarks owned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
  7. Apple defines its restrictions on harmful substances, including definitions for what Apple considers to be “free of,” in the Apple Regulated Substances Specification. Every Apple product is free of PVC and phthalates with the exception of AC power cords in India, Thailand (for two-prong AC power cords), and South Korea, where we continue to seek government approval for our PVC and phthalates replacement.

To access and use all the features of Apple Card, you must add Apple Card to Wallet on an iPhone or iPad with the latest version of iOS or iPadOS. Update to the latest version by going to Settings > General > Software Update. Tap Download and Install.

Sours: https://support.apple.com/kb/SP824
USB-C Hub - Best Accessory For Your New Apple Silicon M1 Macbook Pro or Air

Hyper unveils new ‘Dual 4K HDMI’ dongles for using multiple external displays with M1 Macs

One of the biggest limitations of Apple’s M1 MacBook Air and M1 MacBook Pro is that you can only connect one external display. Popular accessory maker Hyper is out with a new HyperDrive accessory designed to remedy this problem, but there are some limitations…

The new HyperDrive Dual 4K HDMI 3-in-1 USB-C Adapter and HyperDrive Dual 4K HDMI 10-in-1 USB-C Hub include support for “4K HDMI extended video output over a single USB-C connection.” Hyper says it achieved this by using a “Hybrid USB Display design that combines DP Alt Mode and Silicon Motion InstantView plug-n-play video technology that does not require software drivers.”

This means that the HyperDrive Dual 4K HDMI dongles can take one USB-C port on your M1 MacBook Pro or MacBook Air and power two external 4K displays. The limitation, however, is that only one of those displays will support 4K at a 60Hz refresh rate. The other display will only run at 4K with a 30Hz refresh rate.

Here are the specs for each of Hyper’s new dongles.

HyperDrive Dual 4K HDMI 3-in-1 USB-C Adapter

  • Connect 2 HDMI Displays at 4K Video. Give any M1/Intel MacBook Pro/Air, Windows PC or Chromebook the ability to connect 2 extended monitors with crystal clear 4K HDMI video using a single USB-C connection.
  • Fast & Easy Setup. In just a few seconds, connect HyperDrive to your device via the built-in USB-C cable and you will see the HyperDisplay app on your desktop. Just double-click it and you are ready to go.
  • Quick Charge Devices. Enjoy powering up your M1 MacBook or any compatible USB-C device in a flash with our 100W USB-C PD Power Delivery pass through charging port.
  • Durable & Functional Design. The beautiful, milled aluminum housing perfectly accents the space gray design of the M1 MacBook while ensuring advanced heat dissipation
  • Ports. HDMI 4K 60Hz, HDMI 4K 30Hz, USB-C PD 100W
  • Dimensions: 102 x 60 x 15 mm / 4.02″ x 2.36″ x 0.59”
  • Weight: 98 g / 3.46 oz

HyperDrive Dual 4K HDMI 10-in-1 USB-C Hub

  • Enjoy 10 Essential Ports. Seamlessly transform M1 MacBook Pro/Air or any compatible USB-C device into a powerhouse workspace with 4K 60Hz and 4K 30Hz HDMI video ports, USB-C 100W Power Delivery port, USB-C 5Gbps Data port, two USB-A 5Gbps data ports, Gigabit Ethernet, MicroSD/SD slots, 3.5mm audio jack for headphones, and more.
  • Connect 2 HDMI Displays at 4K Video. Give any M1/Intel MacBook Pro/Air, Windows PC or Chromebook the ability to connect 2 extended monitors with crystal clear 4K HDMI video using a single USB-C connection.
  • Fast & Easy Setup. In just a few seconds, connect HyperDrive to your device via the built-in USB-C cable and you will see the HyperDisplay app on your desktop. Just double-click it and you are ready to go.
  • Quick Charge Devices. Enjoy powering up your M1 MacBook or any compatible USB-C device in a flash with our 100W USB-C PD Power Delivery pass through charging port.
  • Ports: HDMI 4K 60Hz, HDMI 4K 30Hz, USB-C PD 100W, USB-C 5Gbps, 2 x USB-A 5Gbps, Gigabit Ethernet, MicroSD/SD UHS-I 104MB/s, 3.5mm Audio Jack
  • Dimensions: 125 x 67 x 18 mm / 4.92 x 2.64 x 0.71”
  • Weight: 187.1 g / 6.60 oz / 0.41 lb

Hyper’s new Dual 4K HDMI adapters come at a cost, however.The 3-in-1 version will run you $129.99, while the 10-in-1 hub version will run you $199. Both are available to order today from Hyper’s website.

FTC: We use income earning auto affiliate links.More.


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Sours: https://9to5mac.com/2021/10/12/hyper-m1-macs-dual-displays-dongle/

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