Mercury mountaineer 02

Mercury mountaineer 02 DEFAULT

Before the Mountaineer arrived in 1996 as a '97 model, Mercury had zip on the SUV shelf. Executives there complained that not having one was costing the division customers on the showroom floor. So Ford relented and gave its neglected upmarket cousin an Explorer fitted with Mercury badges, a comblike chrome grille, and restyled bumpers. It was a sure thing, right? How were people to resist those alluring add-ons?

Somehow they did, and Mercury dealers saw their long-awaited Mountaineer sell at a snail's pace compared with the Explorer.

So when FoMoCo redesigned the Explorer and Mountaineer for 2002, it got more serious about differentiating the two. Instead of just rebadging an Explorer, Mercury designers actually did some work. The Mountaineer got a stylishly bold and machined look, compared with the Explorer's conservative and, by then, well-known appearance. Finally, the two looked different.

There were differences under the skin, too. Both received unique shock valving and tires, and the Mountaineer got sole use of a full-time all-wheel-drive system. And each received a different interior, with the Mercury's reflecting its futuristic exterior with lots of aluminumlike trim and white-face gauges.

Differences aside, there's no denying the vehicles' strong relationship - they still share chassis, powertrains, and just about every other major component. They also share major improvements over their predecessors, including a fully boxed frame, an independent rear suspension, three-row seating, rack-and-pinion steering, a new V-8 engine, and a five-speed automatic transmission.

So we acquired a Mountaineer in the summer of 2001 for a long-term test. The Mountaineer had everything an Explorer has, plus an all-wheel-drive system with no low range, an ideal feature to test during a Michigan winter. We liked the techno-styling, and we were curious to see if we'd still like it after 40,000 miles.

The base price of our all-wheel-drive Mountaineer ($31,210) was increased $695 with our choice of the optional 4.6-liter V-8 engine over the standard 4.0-liter V-6. The Luxury Group ($1685) added dual-zone automatic climate control, premium wheels, and a two-tone leather interior. The Convenience Group ($475) added a pair of lighted mirrors on the visors, a HomeLink system for opening the garage, and automatic headlights. To ease getting in and out, we opted for the running boards ($395), and to help us avoid unpleasant encounters with shopping carts, trees, and narcoleptic cows, we signed up for the reverse-sensing system ($255). Well, what the hell, we went all the way and added the towing package ($395), side-curtain airbags ($495), and a power sunroof ($800). An audiophile audio system ($690) rounded out the options. Our tab for the Mountaineer had ballooned to $37,095.

The truck arrived at our Ann Arbor offices in June 2001, and the logbook soon had plenty of positive remarks about the torquey all-aluminum V-8. Most felt power was more than adequate, offering enough juice for brisk highway travel and passing on mountain roads. When asked to tow a ton or more, the engine obliged without complaint.

The five-speed automatic, on the other hand, did not receive such glowing remarks. At 11,000 miles, tech editor Robinson complained of "a hammering jolt through the drivetrain when dropping out of overdrive." Others noted that upshifts were often abrupt and downshifts were rather lumpy when slowing to a stop.

The Mountaineer earned praise for its straight-line stability and firm but well-damped ride that most thought was "not too trucky." It's a big improvement over both the past live-axle Mountaineer and the slightly stiffer-legged Explorer. The fully independent suspension paid dividends, as did the rack-and-pinion steering, which was praised for its low effort and responsiveness.

There were other complaints. The radio layout was graded poorly. The HVAC system received low scores for its difficult manual operation, inability to find and maintain a desired temp, and weak defroster. A couple of editors groused about uncomfortable seats that were unfriendly on the glutes and backs; a big liftgate that when raised was unreasonably high and required too much effort to pull down; the lack of a dead pedal; and automatic door locks that did not unlock as they're supposed to once the vehicle's shifter was placed in park, despite even the dealer's best efforts to program them. The message center had its drawbacks, too. Occasionally, it flashed messages at random intervals and at least once got confused about whether the doors were open or closed.

Inside, the trendy interior proved to be resilient. The upholstery showed some signs of wear after a year of abuse, the metallic paint on the steering-wheel spokes was nicked and scratched most likely by ring-fingered drivers, and the plastic panels in the cargo bay had scuffs scattered about, but that was it. Overall, the quality and durability of the interior impressed us.

As for the exterior, the only real blemishes we experienced were a dented rear bumper — an $1112 wound caused by an overzealous VW Golf at 11,000 miles — and an enigmatic two-inch scrape on the front of the hood.

Mercury recommends service every 5000 miles, at which time the oil and filter are changed and the tires are inspected and rotated. The significant service stops occur at 15,000 and 30,000 miles. They consist of the standard service plus a plethora of other inspections and cost us $90 and $366, respectively. Our only unscheduled stop was for a warranty fix of a leaking front differential pinion seal at 20,466 miles. The rear axle sprang a leak at 39,795 miles, and that repair set us back $95. All told our eight service stops were $672 — $189 more than for our V-8-powered long-term 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited (September 2000).

Considering we often used the Mountaineer to tow and haul, our observed fuel economy of 17 mpg was respectable and on par with other V-8 SUVs we've tested — that Grand Cherokee got 16 mpg. Total fuel cost for 40,000 miles: $3645.

At the conclusion of this test, the Mountaineer was performing as well as it had when new. Just out of the brand-new box, it had sprinted from 0 to 60 mph in 8.9 seconds and eclipsed the quarter-mile in 16.8 seconds. The numbers were identical 13 months later at 40,000 miles. Braking from 70 to 0 mph took 204 feet when new and required only one additional foot at 40,000 miles.

In 13 months of duty, our Mercury sport-ute proved to be a true workhorse, remaining rock solid and enduring whatever we threw at it. Although it did little to arouse our adrenal glands — perhaps you've noticed we're just not all gaga over sport-utes — it did a lot to keep us content. And after all that time, we still preferred its styling to the Explorer's. Which makes us wonder why, through July 2002, Mountaineers were outsold by Explorers nearly 10 to 1. If you're considering a loaded Explorer, check out the Mountaineer first. We would.

Handling is definitely above average among the SUV middies — better than, in my opinion, corresponding Explorer models.
— Swan

Forget it! I can't get in the front seat without banging my head — even with the seat all the way back. And I'm only six feet tall!
— Yates

The second- and third-row seats fold easily, with no sense of junkiness, something Detroit has been poor at.
— Bedard

The button to change the seat position is at the bottom of the side of the seat. You have to reach quite far down the seat to find it.
— Mathews

It hauled ass up the hills and was absolutely perfect on the back dirt roads in Utah only passable by trucks.
— Eisenberg

I would much prefer a large four-door sedan (because of lower load height and better overall drivability and ride) to this mid-size SUV.
— Weber

Does this odometer work? Nearly 40,000 miles, and no rattles, squeaks, or vibrations.
— Markus

Interior has held up remarkably well over 40K miles of our abuse.
— Maki

TIRES: Although the Mountaineer came with Goodyear Eagle LS road tires—not all-terrain tires as do most four-wheel-drive SUVs — we wanted to see if more aggressive "sports truck" tires would improve handling. We decided to try a set of Yokohama AVS S/T tires ($121 each from The Tire Rack: 800-981-3782; www.tirerack.com). The S/Ts feature an aggressive unidirectional tread design, a 320 tread-wear rating, an H speed rating (up to 130 mph), and an A traction grade versus the stock Goodyear's symmetric design, 360 tread-wear rating, S speed rating (up to 112 mph), and B traction grade. The S/Ts also sport a fancy sidewall design that some felt was a bit too "disco." Nonetheless, with the softer-compound Yokos, the Mountaineer pulled 0.71 g on the skidpad, compared with 0.68 g when the stock Goodyears were new. A slight improvement, yes, but enough to merit a serious look at the Yokos as replacement tires.

HEADLAMP BULBS: Headlight manufacturer PIAA (503-643-7422; www.piaa.com) claims its Xtreme White Plus halogen bulbs come close to the color of high-intensity-discharge (HID) bulbs but at a fraction of the cost. More light at night can never hurt, unless maybe you're coming the other way, so we decided to check out this claim. We again went to The Tire Rack, which sent us a pair of 9007 bulbs for $81. After an easy 10-minute installation, we were ready for the dark. Compared with the stock Sylvania bulbs, which cast a golden hue, the PIAA bulbs projected a brighter, whiter light with a hint of blue — similar in color to HIDs, if not in brilliance. For well under $100, the PIAAs' gleaming improvement seems worth the price.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a15147775/2002-mercury-mountaineer-awd-v-8-long-term-road-test/

Used 2002 Mercury Mountaineer for Sale

2002 Mercury Mountaineer - Good truck as long as the tranny has been rebuilt.

I overall love my truck; however, they are known to have an issue with the transmission, causing them to go out randomly. Thankfully, I have a warranty that paid for the rebuild. Not being a small person, I love how much room I have all over. Having a larger family, it's nice having the ability to pull the third row so everyone can fit into one car. However, at the same time, I go through so much gas. About 13 miles to the gallon and I do drive a lot of highway miles. I also like how I can flip all the seats down, allowing for a large amount of storage. I was able to load my entire bathroom remodel inside in just two trips. Another nice feature is the ability the move the gas pedal. My husband is much shorter than me and often is easier to have him just adjust that instead of the seat ... (more)

I overall love my truck; however, they are known to have an issue with the transmission, causing them to go out randomly. Thankfully, I have a warranty that paid for the rebuild. Not being a small person, I love how much room I have all over. Having a larger family, it's nice having the ability to pull the third row so everyone can fit into one car. However, at the same time, I go through so much gas. About 13 miles to the gallon and I do drive a lot of highway miles. I also like how I can flip all the seats down, allowing for a large amount of storage. I was able to load my entire bathroom remodel inside in just two trips. Another nice feature is the ability the move the gas pedal. My husband is much shorter than me and often is easier to have him just adjust that instead of the seat itself. Another issue I have is with the back windows. Having young children having the ability for the windows for the windows to go all the way down to me is dangerous. But it is nice to be able to lock the windows so only the drive can roll them down. However, I feel this should only apply to the rear windows. Generally, only adults sit in the front and should be able to adjust their own window.

Some of my favorite trips we take often is to Backbone State Park outside Strawberry Point, IA. Having my AWD vehicle makes driving around the steep hills and curves of Backbone feel amazing. It is the one time I love being able to pull the window even in the back all the way down so we can drive through the amazing park and taking in the outdoors.

Some of my favorite trips we take often is to Backbone State Park outside Strawberry Point, IA. Having my AWD vehicle makes driving around the steep hills and curves of Backbone feel amazing. It is the one time I love being able to pull the window even in the back all the way down so we can drive through the amazing park and taking in the outdoors.

I would say my favorite part of my mountaineer is that room. The ability it fit several people (seven) in at once or fit basically as much stuff as a regular full-size truck in the back is amazing. I also like the rich appeal. Compared to the sister (Ford Explorer), the Mountaineer's headlights, grill, and other body features have a luxury feel.

I would say my favorite part of my mountaineer is that room. The ability it fit several people (seven) in at once or fit basically as much stuff as a regular full-size truck in the back is amazing. I also like the rich appeal. Compared to the sister (Ford Explorer), the Mountaineer's headlights, grill, and other body features have a luxury feel.

Wheel bearings that seem to always go bad. A transmission that is known to go bad but has not been recalled. Gas mileage that is so horrible you double check needing to go anywhere.

Wheel bearings that seem to always go bad. A transmission that is known to go bad but has not been recalled. Gas mileage that is so horrible you double check needing to go anywhere.

2002 Mercury Mountaineer - Great Vehicle!

I bought this vehicle around 7 months ago, and it has been a wonderful vehicle. The only thing I have had to do to it so far is buy a new gas cap. The interior is in pretty good shape for a older car. Mercury has built a car to last with the Mountaineer. The styling of it is one of the things I like the best. It is a comfortable drive for short distances, as well as long distances. The gas mileage is pretty decent for a larger vehicle. I have driven around 14000 miles these past 7 months, with no problems. I think the only thing that will have to be done to it soon is check the antifreeze, you can sometimes smell it when the engine is running. But, who can complain if that is all that has to be done to it. I have fit a push lawn mower easily into the back compartment. I would like to ... (more)

I bought this vehicle around 7 months ago, and it has been a wonderful vehicle. The only thing I have had to do to it so far is buy a new gas cap. The interior is in pretty good shape for a older car. Mercury has built a car to last with the Mountaineer. The styling of it is one of the things I like the best. It is a comfortable drive for short distances, as well as long distances. The gas mileage is pretty decent for a larger vehicle. I have driven around 14000 miles these past 7 months, with no problems. I think the only thing that will have to be done to it soon is check the antifreeze, you can sometimes smell it when the engine is running. But, who can complain if that is all that has to be done to it. I have fit a push lawn mower easily into the back compartment. I would like to see that happen in some of the smaller SUV's. For the money, I can highly recommend this car. It has a V6 engine, so it is no short in power. The acceleration is quick, and handles beautifully.

I love the green color of my car. I love the size of the of the vehicle.

I love the green color of my car. I love the size of the of the vehicle.

They seem to be prone to leak antifreeze

They seem to be prone to leak antifreeze

Sours: https://www.autolist.com/mercury-mountaineer-2002
  1. Cheers fanfiction
  2. Kcol listen live
  3. Machine shop tempe
  4. Nissan patrol 2013
  5. Cast control cap

Driving the current Ford Explorer is about as electrifying as reading the Uniform Commercial Code backward. The Ranger-derived ute is crude, it's ponderous, and it guzzles harder than a yeoman on leave in Bangkok. Yet it seems as though you can't swing a wet nappy these days without hitting one. Since the Explorer's launch in 1990, Ford has carpeted American byways with 3.5 million of them and added another 430,000 to the shag pile last year alone.

With the 2002 five-door Ford Explorer and Mercury Mountaineer, Ford will not convert all of the remaining nonbelievers. But with this extensive redesign, the company has turned up the voltage enough to jolt their attention. Just assigning Manfred Rumpel to the engineering team earns Ford a gold star.

Rumpel is a former Porsche chassis engineer with a resume that includes helping develop the Porsche 917 for Le Mans and Can-Am. Think Mark Donohue and 1000 horsepower. Rumpel joined Ford 20 years ago and oversaw the design of the Lincoln LS suspension, arguably that car's best feature. The LS served as inspiration for the '02 Explorer and Mountaineer's new all-independent suspension, without which many of the truck's most significant upgrades wouldn't be possible. They include an optional third row of seats, a larger cabin, and better road manners.

"The suspension concept is the same as that used on many luxury cars," Rumpel says. "The challenge was to meet all the requirements of a truck -- more ground clearance, higher [weight] loads, off-road handling -- and still make it fun to drive."


Up front, the ancient torsion bars are gone, replaced by two pairs of independent control arms bolted to aluminum knuckles and braced by coil-over shock assemblies. The IRS has cast-aluminum upper and beefy stamped-steel lower control arms with cast-iron knuckles and toe-control links. Visteon supplies the aluminum pumpkin and its cogged internals, which for safekeeping are mounted 0.8-inch higher than the old iron-case differential and shielded by skid plates.

Despite larger disc brakes all around (12.0 inches forward, 11.9 inches aft), rear unsprung weight drops from about 400 pounds with the old live axle to about 100 pounds, says Rumpel. The new rear suspension has eight times the lateral stiffness of the live axle, he says. From empty up to the full 1500-pound payload capacity, the Explorer's rear camber change is just 1.8 degrees, and toe changes are virtually nil. That should help preserve the Explorer's sharper handling regardless of how much gear is piled in back. However, the suspension does contribute to an overall weight increase for the Explorer of about 200 pounds.

Since the IRS eliminates the traditional rear-frame kickup that is required in most trucks for axle travel, more gear will fit in back. By running the frame rails flat around the differential (the half-shafts poke through conical tunnels in the rails), Ford was able to lay the rear cabin floor a handy seven inches lower than in the old model. The IRS also helps reduce cabin intrusion by the rear wheel wells. With the middle row folded and the third bench absent, cargo volume rises by 6 cubic feet to 88.

Overall, the new Explorer/Mountaineer is 1.9 inches wider and has more generous leg, hip, and shoulder room for front- and middle-row passengers. Headroom remains essentially unchanged (the roof stamping is one of the few carry-over parts). An inflatable window curtain that deploys from the roof to protect against side impacts will be standard at launch. Within a year, Ford will offer an optional curtain with additional electronics that inflate the bag during rollovers, too.

The Explorer had to be wider to accommodate the taller cylinder heads of Ford's 4.6-liter SOHC V-8. After 32 years in the Ford catalog, the 4.9-liter pushrod V-8 becomes a faded memory unless you live in Australia, where the 302 is still offered in the domestic Ford Falcon sedan.

 

Initially, the Explorer/Mountaineer options sheets will feature only the single-cam version of the 4.6 making 240 horsepower at 4750 rpm and 280 pound-feet of torque at 4000 rpm. However, Ford engineers were quick to point out that the 4.6 DOHC V-8 fits, although it won't be offered when the truck hits dealerships in January. For both the Explorer and Mountaineer, the new base engine will be the current 4.0-liter SOHC V-6 (now an option on the Explorer), making the same 210 horsepower at 5250 rpm but with 10 more pound-feet of torque, or 250 at 4000 rpm.

The power moves aft through a new five-speed automatic derived from the Lincoln LS box. A five-speed manual will be offered with the V-6 late in 2001, and Dale Claudepierre, compact-SUV-line director, hints that a six-speed automatic is in the pipeline to help the Explorer do its part in increasing Ford's sport-utility fleet fuel economy the promised 25 percent by 2005.

Ford has enhanced the Control Trac driver-selectable four-wheel-drive system with new electronics. They know when to order the electromechanical transfer case to shift torque rear to front even before the wheels start to spin. Improving response time and dry-road handling is the goal. The Mountaineer has an exclusive, optional full-time four-wheel-drive system.


The Mountaineer also has a unique face and composite front fenders distinct from the Expedition-like steel panels of the Explorer. The wheelbase on both wagons is 2.1 inches longer, in part to pull the front wheels forward to shorten the front overhang. For the first time, Ford is publicly giving chief designer J Mays full credit for the looks of a vehicle. Decide for yourself whether he has begun earning all the ballyhoo made about him in the media.

By the time you read this, we'll have hung the Datron equipment on the side of a new five-door Explorer (the three-door Sport remains on the old Explorer platform with the Sport Trac) to record test numbers. Although we're not expecting to be electrified, it's possible we'll be shocked at how well it all works.

Technical Highlight

Only the AM General Hummer and the Mercedes M-class also offer both an independent rear suspension and body-on-frame construction. The '02 Explorer's IRS and longer wheelbase will help make basic off-road and towing chores easier. Approach and departure angles on the new Explorer are 31 degrees and 24.5 degrees, respectively, each about 3 degrees better than the old Explorer XLT. Plus, an '02 Explorer with a V-8 and two-wheel drive can tow 7300 pounds, 500 more than the current V-8 two-wheel-drive model.

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, rear-, rear/4-, or 4-wheeldrive, 5–7-passenger, 5-door wagon

ESTIMATED BASE PRICE: $27,000–$35,000

ENGINES: SOHC 12-valve 4.0-liter V-6, 210 hp, 250 lb-ft;SOHC 16-valve 4.6-liter V-8, 240 hp, 280 lb-ft

TRANSMISSIONS: 5-speed manual, 5-speed automatic with lockup torque converter

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 113.7 in Length: 189.5–190.7 in Width: 72.1 in Height: 71.1–71.9 in
Curb weight: 4100–4400 lb

MANUFACTURER’S PERFORMANCE RATINGS:
Zero to 60 mph: 10.2 sec (V-6), 8.6 sec (V-8)

FUEL ECONOMY:
EPA city driving: 14–16 mpg
EPA highway driving: 19–22 mpg

Specifications

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, rear-, rear/4-, or 4-wheeldrive, 5-7-passenger, 5-door wagon

ESTIMATED BASE PRICE: $27,000-$35,000

ENGINES: SOHC 12-valve 4.0-liter V-6, 210 hp, 250 lb-ft;SOHC 16-valve 4.6-liter V-8, 240 hp, 280 lb-ft

TRANSMISSIONS: 5-speed manual, 5-speed automatic with lockup torque converter

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 113.7 in Length: 189.5-190.7 in Width: 72.1 in Height: 71.1-71.9 in
Curb weight: 4100-4400 lb

MANUFACTURER'S PERFORMANCE RATINGS:
Zero to 60 mph: 10.2 sec (V-6), 8.6 sec (V-8)

FUEL ECONOMY:
EPA city driving: 14-16 mpg
EPA highway driving: 19-22 mpg

ExpandCollapse

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a15139808/2002-ford-explorer-mercury-mountaineer-first-drive-review/
2002 Mercury Mountaineer AWD V8 Start Up, Rev, \u0026 Quick Tour - 99k

Mercury Mountaineer

American car model

Motor vehicle

The Mercury Mountaineer is a mid-size luxury sport utility vehicle (SUV) that was sold by Mercury from 1996 until 2010. Sharing many of its features with the Ford Explorer, the vehicles were virtually identical in terms of hardware.[1] Externally, they were styled somewhat differently, and the Mountaineer was positioned with a more upscale interior, with the Mountaineer's MSRP coming in at $1,000–$6,000 more than the Explorer.[2] It was last redesigned for the 2006 model year with a new frame, looking very similar to its previous model.

Some controversy resulted after the media highlighted a number of rollovers involving Explorers and Mountaineers fitted with Firestone tires. The Mountaineer has been praised for its excellent handling and stability.[3] The Mountaineer was never sold in Canada.[citation needed] As part of the discontinuation of the Mercury brand, production of the Mountaineer ended in late 2010.[4]

Background[edit]

Ford Explorer Limited (1993), indirect Ford predecessor of the Mercury Mountaineer

In 1990, General Motors introduced the Oldsmobile Bravada sport-utility vehicle, derived from the four-door Chevrolet S-10 Blazer. Though far lower in price, the Bravada was marketed as a competitor to the Range Rover (and the later Land Rover Discovery) and Toyota Land Cruiser. While sharing its body with the Blazer, Oldsmobile differentiated the Bravada with the use of model-specific trim and a dedicated all-wheel drive powertrain (in place of part-time four-wheel drive). For 1993, Jeep briefly revived the long-running Grand Wagoneer nameplate as part of the Jeep Grand Cherokee model line, using woodgrain exterior trim and a leather interior; limited sales led to its cancellation after a single model year.

As a response to the Bravada and the Grand Wagoneer, Ford introduced the 1993 Ford Explorer Limited in 1992. In contrast to the outdoors-themed Explorer Eddie Bauer, the Limited was geared towards on-road driving; it was fitted with all-wheel drive in place of traditional four-wheel drive. The Limited was also distinguished by monochromatic body trim, body-color bumpers, and chrome wheels.

As part of the redesign of the Explorer for 1995, the Limited remained part of the Explorer lineup, with the segment gaining additional competitors through the use of badge engineering. For 1996, the Acura SLX (Isuzu Trooper), Infiniti QX4 (Nissan Pathfinder), and the larger Lexus LX450 (Toyota Land Cruiser) were introduced together.

As these brands, along with Oldsmobile, competed more directly with luxury brands than the Ford model line, Ford Motor Company sought to develop SUVs for its Lincoln-Mercury division. To minimize model overlap, Mercury was chosen to sell a version of the mid-size Ford Explorer, while Lincoln would sell a version of the then-upcoming full-size Ford Expedition.

First generation (1997–2001)[edit]

Motor vehicle

First generation
1998-2001 Mercury Mountaineer -- 03-21-2012.JPG

1998–2001 Mercury Mountaineer

ProductionApril 1996–2001
Model years1997-2001
RelatedFord Explorer
Ford Ranger
Mazda B-Series
Ford Explorer Sport Trac
Lincoln Aviator
Engine4.0 L CologneV6
5.0 L WindsorV8
Transmission4-speed automatic
5-speed automatic
Wheelbase1997: 111.5 in (2,832 mm)
1998–2001: 111.6 in (2,835 mm)
Length1997: 188.5 in (4,788 mm)
1998–99: 190.1 in (4,829 mm)
2000–01: 190.7 in (4,844 mm)
Width70.2 in (1,783 mm)
Height1997 2WD: 66.8 in (1,697 mm)
1997 4WD: 66.7 in (1,694 mm)
1998–2001 2WD: 70.5 in (1,791 mm)
1998–2001 4WD: 70.3 in (1,786 mm)

The Mercury Mountaineer began production in April 1996[5] as a 1997 model. As with the Ford Explorer Limited, the Mercury Mountaineer was offered only in a four-door body configuration. After its first year, sales of the Mountaineer fell short of Lincoln-Mercury sales projections. Following several revisions in 1997 and 1998, the Mountaineer would go on to become the third-best selling vehicle in the Mercury division, behind only the Sable and the Grand Marquis.

Body[edit]

At its launch, the Mercury Mountaineer was closest in appearance to the Ford Explorer XLT, though trimmed between the Explorer Eddie Bauer and Explorer Limited. To differentiate it from its Ford counterpart, the Mountaineer was styled with a distinct dark-gray lower body color scheme; while visually similar to the Explorer, the Mountaineer adopted the chrome waterfall grille styling of the Grand Marquis. While the taillights were model-specific, the rear hatch and bumper were shared with the European-export version of the Explorer.

As part of a 1998 model revision, the Mountaineer was given a model-specific grille and headlights, larger wheels, and a new rear hatch design.

Chassis[edit]

The 1997-2001 Mercury Mountaineer shares the chassis of the four-door Ford Explorer, following its 1995 redesign. Though heavily based upon the first-generation Ford Ranger, the sport-utility vehicles are wider and are based on a separate wheelbase. As with the Ford Explorer, the Mountaineer is fitted with fully independent wishbone front suspension.

For 1997, the Mercury Mountaineer was fitted with a 215hp 5.0L V8 with a 4-speed automatic transmission. For 1998, the 205hp 4.0L V6 SOHC was offered as an option. Like the Ford Explorer, the V8 engine was mated to either rear-wheel drive or full time all-wheel drive (viscous coupling center differential); part-time four-wheel drive was unavailable with the V8 engine. The V6 Mountaineer or Explorer were offered either as rear-wheel drive or ControlTrac with "Auto", "High" and "Low" modes.

Trim[edit]

The first-generation Mercury Mountaineer was introduced in a single trim level, offering many optional features of the Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer and Limited as standard. For 1998, Mercury introduced a V6-engined version of the Mountaineer to expand its price range. Though including a different powertrain, Mercury chose to offer largely the same features on both versions.

Second generation (2002–2005)[edit]

Motor vehicle

Second generation
2nd Mercury Mountaineer.jpg
ProductionNovember 2000–2005
RelatedFord Explorer
Ford Explorer Sport Trac
Lincoln Aviator
Ford Ranger
Engine4.0 L CologneV6
4.6 L ModularV8
Transmission5-speed automatic
Wheelbase2002–03: 113.7 in (2,888 mm)
2004–05: 113.8 in (2,891 mm)
Length2002–03: 190.7 in (4,844 mm)
2004–05: 190.9 in (4,849 mm)
Width2002–03: 72.1 in (1,831 mm)
2004–05: 72.3 in (1,836 mm)
Height2002–03 2WD: 69.6 in (1,768 mm)
2002–03 AWD: 71.5 in (1,816 mm)
2004–05: 72.5 in (1,842 mm)

For the 2002 model year, the second-generation Mercury Mountaineer was introduced as a counterpart to the third-generation Ford Explorer.[6] Previewed by a concept vehicle at the 2000 Los Angeles Auto Show, the 2002 Mercury Mountaineer marked the introduction of a new design language for the Mercury line, highlighted by a silver waterfall grille and silver-trimmed taillamps. In various forms, style elements of the Mountaineer would appear across the Mercury line, including the Grand Marquis, Montego, Milan, Monterey, and Mariner.

As part of the redesign, the Mountaineer was given further differentiation from the Explorer; while sharing the same roofline and doors, much of the lower sheetmetal was different, with the Mountaineer having different front fenders and hood, front and rear bumpers, liftgate, and taillamps.

Sharing a chassis with the third-generation Ford Explorer, the Mountaineer was fitted with four-wheel independent suspension. Sharing the 4.0L V6 of its predecessor, the second-generation Mountaineer also was fitted with the 4.6L V8 engine option of the Explorer, with four-wheel drive and all-wheel drive optional powertrain layouts; a 5-speed automatic transmission was standard.

In line with other Mercury models, the Mountaineer expanded from a single trim level to a base Convenience trim and a deluxe Premier trim; slotted above the Explorer Limited, the Mountaineer Premier offered features including a rear TV/DVD player, rear ceiling air vents, chrome exhaust tip and roof rack, and body-color bumpers.

Third generation (2006–2010)[edit]

Motor vehicle

For the 2006 model year, Ford redesigned its mid-size SUVs. While its U251 platform was all-new, the third-generation Mountaineer followed on with the success of its predecessor by retaining nearly its entire exterior, unlike the Explorer. For the 2006 Mountaineer, the exterior redesign featured clear lens tail lamps, turn signal repeaters on the front fenders, larger wheels, satin silver trim on the sideview mirrors and bumpers; the Mercury logos on the grille and tailgate were enlarged.

Since the discontinuation of the Lincoln Aviator left the Mountaineer as the top nameplate of the Ford mid-size SUV model lineup, much of the attention of the redesign was focused in the interior trim and features to better differentiate it from the Explorer Eddie Bauer and Limited. Carried over from the Lincoln Aviator was the option of a DVD-based navigation system with voice control; this system would be unavailable on the Explorer until 2008. As an option, power retracting running boards (as seen on the Lincoln Navigator) were a new feature.

As with all Mountaineers since 2001, a 210 hp 4.0L SOHC V6 was the standard engine. As with the Explorer, the 292 hp 4.6L Modular 24-valve V8 was an option. V6 Mountaineers used a 5-speed 5R55W automatic transmission. For V8 models, Ford developed an all-new 6-speed transmission based on a ZF design; the 6R automatic was fitted to all V8 Explorers and Mountaineers.

During its production, this generation saw relatively few functional changes. In 2008, side curtain airbags became standard. On the outside, "MOUNTAINEER" badging was added to the front doors in 2007. For 2009, versions of the Mountaineer configured for towing were upgraded as trailer-sway control was made standard. To potentially save fuel for drivers, the navigation system was given upgrades, including traffic flow monitoring and live updates on gasoline prices from nearby service stations.[7] For 2010, Ford's MyKey was added as a standard feature on all trim levels; it is a programmable security system designed for vehicles owned by multiple drivers.

Discontinuation[edit]

Following the June 2010 announcement by Ford Motor Company to shelve the Mercury brand, 2010 would be the end of Mountaineer production; the final vehicle was produced on October 1, 2010.[8] Unlike the Milan, Mariner, and Grand Marquis, the Mountaineer was not produced for a short 2011 model year due to the 2011 redesign and resizing to a crossover of the Ford Explorer. The third-best selling vehicle of the division in 2000, the Mountaineer was the worst-selling Mercury ten years later. One replacement for the Mountaineer was the Lincoln MKT, the luxury counterpart to the 5th-generation Explorer.

Firestone tire controversy[edit]

Main article: Firestone vs Ford Motor Company controversy

In May 2000, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) contacted Ford and Firestone about the high incidence of tire failure on first generation Mercury Mountaineers, first and second generation Ford Explorers, and Mazda Navajo 3-doors fitted with Firestone tires. Ford investigated and found that several models of 15-inch (381 mm) Firestone tires (ATX, ATX II, and Wilderness AT) had very high failure rates, especially those made at Firestone's Decatur, Illinois plant.

Awards[edit]

  • Class Exclusive Roll Stability Control (RSC) System.
  • Consumers Digest Best Buy for 2006 and 2007.

Sales[edit]

Calendar Year American sales
1996 26,700[9]
1997 45,363[10]
1998 47,595
1999[11]49,281
2000 46,547
2001[12]45,574
2002[13]48,144
2003 49,692
2004[14]43,916
2005 32,491
2006[15]29,567
2007 23,850
2008[16]10,596
2009[17]5,169
2010[18]5,791

References[edit]

  1. ^"Used 2010 Mercury Mountaineer Prices, Reviews, and Pictures". Edmunds.
  2. ^Forbes, 2000 Mountaineer review
  3. ^"2007 Mercury Mountaineer SUV Review - Edmunds.com". February 16, 2007. Archived from the original on February 16, 2007.
  4. ^"Mercury production to cease in late September?" from Autoblog (July 12, 2010)
  5. ^fordauthority.com/fmc/ford-motor-company-plants-facilities/ford-motor-company-usa-plants-facilities/ford-motor-company-louisville-assembly-plant-louisville-kentucky-usa/
  6. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 6, 2001. Retrieved May 6, 2001.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^"2009 Mercury Mountaineer Review & Ratings". Edmunds.
  8. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 14, 2011. Retrieved June 3, 2010.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 22, 2013. Retrieved February 11, 2016.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 29, 2013. Retrieved April 28, 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  11. ^"Ford Motor Company Sets New Full Year U.S. Sales Record". Theautochannel.com. Retrieved April 28, 2009.
  12. ^"Ford Motor Company's December U.S. Sales Climb 8.2 Percent"(PDF). Ford Motor Company.
  13. ^"Ford's F-Series Truck Caps 22nd Year in a Row as America's Best-Selling Vehicle With a December Sales Record". Theautochannel.com. November 17, 2004. Retrieved April 28, 2009.
  14. ^"Ford Achieves First Car Sales Increase Since 1999". Theautochannel.com. November 17, 2004. Retrieved April 28, 2009.
  15. ^"Ford Motor Company 2007 sales". January 3, 2008.
  16. ^"F-Series drives ford to higher market share for third consecutive month"(PDF). Ford Motor Company. January 5, 2009. Retrieved May 14, 2009.
  17. ^"FORD CAPS 2009 WITH 33 PERCENT SALES INCREASE, FIRST FULL-YEAR MARKET SHARE GAIN SINCE 1995 | Ford Motor Company Newsroom". Media.ford.com. January 5, 2010. Retrieved September 30, 2010.
  18. ^http://media.ford.com/images/10031/Dec10sales.pdf

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury_Mountaineer

Mountaineer 02 mercury

Then what are we wasting time. - I started the car, taxied onto the road and drove along the avenue towards the exit to the city. At the first traffic light, stopped at a. Red signal. He turned to Lyusa and half in jest: I never thought that the girl would take this call to action instantly.

2002 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER

Only after that, with tears in her eyes, she confessed that she had been raped by an alien creature, in whose. Clutches she had fallen into the jungle. Robb expected Sophia to blame him for everything, but to the man's surprise, her coldness suddenly evaporated after the incident. The girl looked at him gratefully when he brought her to the medical unit and then when Robb treated her wounds and.

Now discussing:

For the whole evening I suddenly felt really scared. What an evening there, I was probably for the first time in my life really scared. I have never been threatened with a prison term, and even more so for something that I have not done, and from this. I felt some weakness in my legs. "What.



14716 14717 14718 14719 14720