Venture brothers hank

Venture brothers hank DEFAULT

‘Venture Bros': Are Hank and Dean Destined to Arch Each Other?

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the Season 7 finale of “The Venture Bros.”)

“The Venture Bros.” has changed quite a bit over seven seasons and 15 years, but nowhere is that more clear than in the story of its title characters, brothers Hank and Dean. And in season finale, “The Saphrax Protocol, “their relationship took a turn that hints at what could turn into the show’s most tragic story to date: The Venture Bros. as arch enemies.

It became clear midway through Season 7 that, while Hank and Dean didn’t get as much screen time as they might have in previous seasons, the emotional heart of the series was with them. Finally, the Venture brothers are being allowed to grow up. But with growing up comes the ability of Dean and Hank to hurt each other.

Dean, especially.

In the penultimate episode of the season, “The Forecast Manufacturer,” Dean committed a huge act of betrayal: He slept with Sarina (Cristin Milioti), Hank’s girlfriend. And when Hank caught Dean and Sarina in the act, he had a stroke from the shock, and went into a coma. So he remains as the episode begins, stuck in a heavily metaphorical comatose dream influenced by a combination of “Barbarella” and “The Empire Strikes Back,” while Dean keeps a vigil for him at his hospital bed.

Also Read:'Venture Bros' Finale Changes Everything Between Rusty and the Monarch

For Dean, Hank’s near-death is a huge wakeup call, and so it is that he spends the episode explaining to his comatose brother all the ways he has been terrible to him over the years. There’s a lot he confesses to, but the main thing is that Dean admits he’s worried and depressed about the distance that’s grown between them — distance Dean reveals he was as much responsible for as Hank was. That led him to sleep with Serina in hopes of breaking her and Hank up. Dean even confesses he’s jealous that Hank is the kind of person who feels no shame walking around in public wearing a “Batman” mask.

Hank, meanwhile, realizes during his comatose dream that he has been avoiding even the beginnings of adulthood, by becoming obsessed with his girlfriend and living a kind of fantasy world in real life to avoid it. This wakes Hank up from his coma, ironically just as Dean has fallen asleep in the hospital. Dean wakes up to learn Hank checked himself out, and in the episode’s final moments, Dean scrambles outside looking desperately for Hank, but to no avail.

In voice over narration that, by the way, totally parodies the end of “Darkman,” Hank disappears into a crowd, proclaiming his intent to go find himself, to finally grow up. As he walks into the distance, he turns around for one last look back, this time covering his face… with that “Batman” mask.

Also Read:'The Venture Bros': Wait, Is Time Travel at the Center of Everything?

Throughout the season, Hank (Christopher McCulloch) and Dean (Michael Sinterniklaas) took serious, if tentative, steps into adulthood, although the distance they covered wasn’t equal. They’ve both been exposed to countless dangers since childhood, and as young adults have reacted in dramatically different ways.

Hank, still content to indulge in childlike bouts of make-believe, is more or less at home in the weird world of costumed villains and killer spies in which the Ventures live. The madness of it all rolls off his back when he isn’t actively trying to take part, which to his disappointment he’s constantly forbidden from doing. Worse, he knows he’s clearly not his father’s favorite, knowledge that has depressed and alienated him.

Dean, meanwhile, has some unwanted knowledge of his own that Hank doesn’t. For instance, of his father, Rusty Venture’s ill-advised dalliance with the underage president of the Rusty Venture fan club, which resulted in the secret birth of Hank and Dean’s half-brother, actually Hank’s friend Dermot. Dean also knows the horrifying truth about himself: he and Hank are actually clones, activated after their originals were killed, with all the originals’ backed-up memories uploaded into their brains. and what’s worse, they’re the 14th such clones — they’re actually at least three years (at least) older than they think they are, because of lengthy gaps between clone activations. And by this point in his life, he’s very much over all of it.

And that’s not including the fact that Rusty has ignored both brothers’ natures: Hank, who craves the approval and companionship of his father, but is rejected as unworthy; and Dean, who wants no part of his father’s life or the family business at all, and whose objections are ignored.

In the end, the brothers are now separated, not only by an emotional gulf, but by a physical one.

Also Read:'The Venture Bros': Yup, That Clown's Voice Was Exactly Who You Thought It Was

So what does this distance mean for Season 8? Their drama stems from their attempts to avoid the choices set for them by their father. And it’s very easy to see how those attempts will lead them down that exact path, by becoming each other’s opposite.

Hank seems very intent on living the superhero life he’s always envisioned for himself — he’s even wearing a Batman Halloween mask in his final appearance in Season 7. He could easily become a “protagonist,” to use the official terminology for “Hero” of the Guild of Calamitous Intent.

Could Dean, meanwhile, become Hank’s antagonist? In a lot of ways, Dean already has. And that’s not accounting for their father, Rusty, who has never been able to pull himself free of the superhero life his father Jonas (Paul Boocock) created for him. And despite his complaints, Rusty has been pushing Dean into that life, just as Jonas pushed Rusty into it. The ruts are well-worn, and they’re also all Dean and Hank have ever known.

Also Read:'The Venture Bros': Kinder, Softer Villainy Is Escapism Within Escapism

To see Dean and Hank stuck forever on the hamster wheel of “costumed aggression,” constantly angry at and jealous of each other for the rest of their lives, would be fitting with the show’s hilarious but often difficult looks toxic masculinity, parenthood, failure, and whether people can change for the better. It’d certainly make for some great comedy to see Hank’s idea of Batman face off against Dean’s idea of, say, Lex Luthor. And considering the show has teased that there might be a new set of Venture brothers to fulfill the title of the show, contrasting that conflict with this new one would be a great touch.

But that, really, would be the most tragic part of a show that’s often already pretty tragic. With the story of Hank and Dean, “The Venture Bros.” is exploring coming of age through its particularly warped lens, but it’s pitting the Ventures against history, inertia, and trauma. The big question of Season 8 isn’t whether Rusty and the Monarch are brothers, or what will become of the Guild of Calamitous Intent. It’s whether Hank and Dean can become men, what men they’ll become, and whether they’ll be able to stop hurting each other along the way.

TV Shows You Should Binge-Watch Right Now, From 'Succession' to 'Riverdale'

  • tv shows you should binge watch right now

    Need something new to watch? You're in the middle of what might be the the most optimal time to watch TV ever (when you can't go out because there's a pandemic). Fortunately, there's no shortage of awesome shows out there across a number of streaming services. Here's every streaming show you should absolutely make time for.

  • Succession Greg

    "Succession" (Seasons 1-2 on HBO Go) - 

    This extremely dry comedy about a billionaire family full of clownish jerks -- everybody tends to compare them to the Murdochs --  is one of the most memeable shows on television.

  • Brooklyn Nine-Nine - Season 6

    "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" (Seasons 1-7 on Hulu) - 

    Likewise, "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" is a sitcom with real heart, where all the main characters always have good intentions and just wanna help each other. And also it's really funny.

  • Anne Hathaway Modern Love

    "Modern Love" (Season 1 on Amazon Prime Video) 

    If you just want something super nice and sweet to watch, this fairly short anthology series really hits the spot. It's just a series of stories about people who form surprising relationships that aren't necessarily based in romance. It'll make you feel good!

  • "Homeland" (Season 1-7 on Netflix, and 1-8 on Showtime Anytime) - 

    This series, about a bipolar CIA agent who gets involved in some really messy situations, just ended its run on Showtime. So right now you'll get a lengthy show to watch that you know will eventually have a conclusion.

  • The Plot Against America

    "The Plot Against America" (Season 1 on HBO Go) - 

    It's really nice, in times of great collective stress, to experience a story that helps you contextualize the real world while pretty far removed from the present moment. And this story, which depicts an alternate history in which Charles Lindbergh defeated FDR for the presidency in 1940, definitely fits that bill.

  • Jack Ryan John Krasinski

    "Jack Ryan" (Seasons 1-2 on Amazon Prime Video) - 

    This John Krasinski action drama based on the famous Tom Clancy character is certainly very corny, but sometimes that's what you need.

  • Dickinson

    "Dickinson" (Season 1 on Apple TV+) - 

    The easy highlight of the Apple TV+ slate so far. This sort of modernist teen comedy version of Emily Dickinson's formative years is super clever.

  • The Purge Season 2

    "The Purge" (Season 1 on Hulu, Season 2 is purchasable from digital retailers) - 

    The two seasons of "The Purge" we got on USA Network were more than worthy entries in the franchise alongside the movies. In some ways they're even better, since we get more time to explore this strange utopia.

  • SWEET MAGNOLIAS netflix

    "Sweet Magnolias" (Season 1 on Netflix) -

    It's as though "Riverdale" had a surprisingly wholesome Southern baby. It might not be the glossiest show, but it's oddly effective as comfort food.

  • prison break lincoln burrows dominic purcell

    "Prison Break" (Seasons 1-5 on Hulu) - 

    This show is so crazy in a very network TV kind of way, but it's full of characters that you'll become very attached to very quickly. Even the horrible ones.

  • Outlander Season 4 2018

    "Outlander" (Season 1-3 on Netflix, Season 1-5 on Starz) - 

    We all need a grand romantic adventure in our lives, right? And it doesn't get much more grand or romantic than Starz's flagship series about an early 20th century woman who accidentally travels to the distant past and falls in love there.

  • Riverdale

    "Riverdale" (Seasons 1-3 on Netflix) - 

    This odd teen drama based on the Archie Comics characters is just about the trashiest show imaginable. And that's why it's so, so good.

  • designated survivor characters ranked tom kirkman

    "Designated Survivor" (Seasons 1-3 on Netflix) - 

    The story of a reluctant successor taking the presidency after a tragedy that destroys the government is full of positive American idealism. "Designated Survivor" combines a little bit of "The West Wing" with "24" to make something that's extremely watchable, and the Netflix-exclusive third season got so real in exactly the right way.

    ABC
  • the young pope binge watch gallery

    "The Young Pope"/"The New Pope" (Both on HBO Go, HBO Now) - 

    Jude Law is the first American pope in HBO's dark comedy about religion, authority, politics and backstabbing. And then John Malkovich popped in as his successor in "The New Pop." A thoroughly brilliant bit of casting if you ask us.

  • santa clarita diet netflix weekend binge watch

    "Santa Clarita Diet" (Seasons 1-3 on Netflix) - 

    Drew Barrymore is a suburban realtor who suddenly dies, then comes back with a taste for human flesh in Netflix’s gory comedy. Not quite a zombie, she struggles to carry on life as usual with her husband, Timothy Olyphant, as they find themselves killing their neighbors to keep her fed so she won’t go full evil.

  • the runaways hulu binge weekend

    "The Runaways" (Seasons 1-3 on Hulu) - 

    Hulu's first Marvel show stands apart from a lot of the other superhero offerings on TV by following a group of diverse teen protagonists. After they discover their parents might basically be supervillains, a group of kids start discovering they have strange abilities of their own. "The Runaways" is a great change of pace from the usual superhero show.

  • glow binge watch weekend

    "Glow" (Seasons 1-3 on Netflix) - 

    Netflix's comedy heads back to the 1980s for the historic formation of the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling show, hitting on some ridiculous situations as a group of women with no wrestling experience try to come together to make something amazing. "Glow" sports a hysterical cast, and its first season is a quick binge that's totally worth the investment. 

    Netflix
  • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events

    "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" (seasons 1-3 on Netflix) - 

    Netflix's adaptation of the children's book series is a blast, featuring great performances from a variety of visiting stars, from Joan Cusack to Don Johnson. They're all led by a hilariously evil Neil Patrick Harris.

    Netflix
  • altered carbon netflix

    "Altered Carbon" (season 1-2 on Netflix) - 

    If you're looking for a huge, beautiful, expansive sci-fi vision, "Altered Carbon" is a good place to start. Netflix's adaptation of the book of the same name imagines a world where bodies are interchangeable and people are stored as digital versions of themselves. There's a whole lot to absorb in this hard-boiled sci-fi murder mystery.

    Netflix
  • the expanse binge

    "The Expanse" (Seasons 1-4 on Amazon Prime Video) - 

    Syfy's return to space opera is like "Game of Thrones," but with interplanetary travel. Mixing a murder mystery and a Cold War conspiracy story, "The Expanse" is full of zero-gee special effects and characters flying around the solar system, trying to prevent a war that could end humanity. The first season is available to stream on Amazon, while the second season recently wrapped up on Syfy.

    Syfy
  • Bosch

    "Bosch" (seasons 1-6 on Amazon) - 

    Amazon's police procedural follows a troubled cop as he struggles to solve a decades-old child murder. Amazon has three seasons at the ready right now, with a fourth season confirmed on the way.

    Amazon
  • netflix dark time travel show why you should watch

    "Dark" (seasons 1-2 on Netfix) - 

    A dark story about a small German town where kids keep disappearing, "Dark" picks up speed when secretive sci-fi elements start to impact the lives of everyone in town. Think a darker, more adult "Stranger Things."

    Netflix
  • the path hulu aaron paul original series binge

    "The Path" (seasons 1-3 on Hulu) - 

    Things are spiraling out of control in the cult known as Meyerism in Hulu’s drama. Aaron Paul loses his faith and tries to get out, leaving behind his family of believers. Oh, and Hugh Dancy is an unhinged cult leader who’s losing control and murdering folks.

    Hulu
  • Travelers season 2 questions

    "Travelers" (seasons 1-3 on Netflix) - 

    Time travelers from the future walk among us in "Travelers," executing secret orders in order to change the future. This Netflix show has some cool ideas about dealing with the pressures of saving the world, along with the ways messing with the present can affect the future.

    Netflix
  • shut eye

    "Shut Eye" (seasons 1-2 on Hulu) - 

    Hulu’s latest original series is about grifters in the Los Angeles psychic reading business. But then Jeffrey Donovan takes a blow to the head, and suddenly he might actually be seeing the future. The machinations and dark humor pile up as he and his family try to get out from under the thumb of their crime lord bosses.

    Hulu
  • The Man in the High Castle comic-con 2018 release date

    "The Man in the High Castle" (season 1-4 on Amazon) - 

    What if the Nazis had won World War II? The newly released second season of "The Man in the High Castle" takes us back to an alternate universe where the U.S. is divided between Japan and Germany. And the four-season run of this big-budget series is a wild one.

    Amazon
  • "Portlandia" stars finally have sex

    "Portlandia" (seasons 1-8 on Netflix) - 

    The IFC surrealist comedy, starring Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein, is really something. In the meantime, though, the rest of the series is available to watch straight through on Netflix.

    IFC
  • Catastrophe

    "Catastrophe" (seasons 1-4 on Amazon Prime Video) - 

    With only six half-hour episodes in each of its four seasons, Amazon’s acclaimed sitcom “Catastrophe” is an easy binge. From creators Sharon Horgan and Rob Delaney, who also star.

    Amazon
  • Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

    "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" (seasons 1-4 on Netflix) - 

    The Tina Fey-created, Ellie Kemper-starring comedy is definitely a must-watch, with four seasons and a movie available on Netflix right now. Predicated on the premise that the titular Kimmy escaped being kidnapped and held in a bunker and is now picking her life up where she left off, "The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" is full of ridiculous situations in the vein of shows like "30 Rock."

    Netflix
  • ozark binge watch netflix

    "Ozark" (Seasons 1-3 on Netflix) - 

    Think "Breaking Bad" but if the whole family was in on the crimes, and you've got an idea of what "Ozark" is like. It follows a money launderer as he's forced to head from Chicago to Missouri and make big moves to keep a drug cartel off his back. The first season is a tense crime drama, and among the best shows on Netflix.

    Netflix
  • luke cage mike colter marvel cinematic universe netflix

    "Luke Cage" (seasons 1-2 on Netflix) - 

    The latest installment in Marvel's street-level universe (which also includes "Daredevil" and "Jessica Jones") stars Mike Colter as a bulletproof hero bringing justice to Harlem. Besides action and social commentary, it has the best soundtrack of any superhero series ever.

  • jessica jones review 111815

    "Jessica Jones" (seasons 1-2 on Netflix) - 

    Marvel’s "Jessica Jones" won audiences and critics over with its rich storytelling, strong female lead, and intense action sequences. 

  • the punisher bulletproof glass netflix

    "The Punisher" (seasons 1-s on Netflix) - 

    This series spins off from Season 2 of "Daredevil" to take a closer look at the Punisher, a superhero known for dishing out pain to criminals through nothing but sheer willpower. This might be the best of Marvel's shows, though, as it's more about folks working through their emotional trauma than shooting guys.

  • still from Jane The Virgin

    "Jane the Virgin" (season 1-5 on Netflix) - 

    The CW’s charming, telenovela-esque comedy has proved itself to be binge-watching candy. If you haven't checked out "Jane the Virgin," you can get lost in the first three seasons available on Netflix.

  • the get down netflix baz luhrmann weekend binge watch

    "The Get Down" (Season 1-2 on Netflix) - 
    Baz Luhrmann’s stylish look at the birth of hip-hop in New York City is musical and charged with excitement. "The Get Down" deliver something that’s pretty different from other streaming fare, with its 1970s New York setting and the drama surrounding an emerging, exciting art form.

  • Difficult People hulu binge original series

    "Difficult People" (Seasons 1-3 on Hulu) - 

    The darkly comical "Difficult People" made its debut on Hulu at the end of the summer of 2015, impressing critics thanks to the lead performances of Billy Eichner and show creator Julie Klausner. 

  • Silicon Valley

    "Silicon Valley" (Seasons 1-6 on HBO Now and HBO Go) - 

    The fourth season for HBO’s "Silicon Valley" continues its parody of the tech-industry with its loveable band of nerd-entrepreneurs trying to keep their heads above water. Season 4 of the show just wrapped up, so there's plenty of comedy to be had on HBO Go and HBO Now.

  • the crown claire foy john lithgow vanessa kirby

    "The Crown" (seasons 1-3 on Netflix) - 

    If you spend all your free time worrying about the Queen of England's health, this is the series for you. It looks at the last days of Winston Churchill, and how Elizabeth II took on the burden of the crown.

  • Jonathan Banks, Bob Odenkirk on "Better Call Saul"

    "Better Call Saul" (Netflix, season 1-4 only) - 

    The “Breaking Bad” spinoff may not quite carry its predecessor’s legendary status, but with Vince Gilligan’s writing and Bob Odenkirk’s acting, "Better Call Saul" really is just as good. 

  • rick and morty Every Rick Ranked seal team rick

    "Rick and Morty" (Seasons 1-4 on Hulu) - 

    Dark and ridiculous, "Rick and Morty" might be animated, but it's definitely not for children. The Adult Swim cartoon is about Rick, an often-drunk super-scientist, and his grandson Morty, who accompanies him on ridiculous adventures. 

    Adult Swim
  • The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

    "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" (seasons 1-3 on Amazon) - 

    A hilarious story about a former housewife in the 1950s who discovers she's a dynamite stand-up comedian, there's a reason "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" has been an awards darling since its first season.

    Amazon
  • julianna margulies good wife

    "The Good Wife" (seasons 1-7 on Hulu and CBS All Access) - 

    Juliana Margulies plays Alicia Florrick, who joins her ex-boyfriend's law firm after her disgraced husband, the Illinois attorney general (Chris Noth) is caught in a prostitution scandal. "The Good Wife" is part relationship drama, part legal procedural -- and always surprisingly funny. 

  • Broad City Season 3

    "Broad City" (seasons 1-5 on Hulu) - 

    Comedy Central’s hilarious, New York-based sitcom had a stellar five-season run. Created by and starring Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson.

  • 13 Reasons Why netflix binge watch gallery

    "13 Reasons Why" (Seasons 1-3 on Netflix) - 
    High school drama "13 Reasons Why" tells the story of a girl who commits suicide, and the tapes she leaves behind for all the people in her life that drove her to that decision. And then it continued to deal with the fallout in the subsequent seasons.

  • "You're the Worst" (seasons 1-5 on Hulu) - 

    The FX comedy about two anti-relationship people (Chris Geere and Aya Cash) in a toxic romance made a positive impression on critics in its first two seasons, which are currently available to stream on Hulu. 

  • "BoJack Horseman" (seasons 1-6 on Netflix) - 

    "BoJack Horseman," Netflix’s hysterical animated social satire, didn’t do so great in its first season, but made vast improvements when it came back. Now considered one of Netflix's best, you can stream all six "BoJack" seasons right now, plus a Christmas special.

  • "Transparent" (seasons 1-5 on Amazon) - 

    Jill Soloway’s Golden-Globe-winning dramedy "Transparent" has received acclaim for its wonderful performances, acerbic writing, and sensitive direction. 

  • Black Mirror

    "Black Mirror" (seasons 1-5 on Netflix) - 

    The darkly, darkly satiric series looks at how technology robs us of our humanity -- or just gives us excuses to abandon it. The series has gotten somewhat more hopeful in recent years, and the "Bandersnatch" interactive movie thing is a real trip.

  • the walking dead andrew lincoln s6e12

    "The Walking Dead" (seasons 1-9 only on Netflix) - 

    As AMC’s most-watched program, "The Walking Dead" has built a large fan base over the course of its many, many seasons. While its newest season has yet to be available for streaming, people can watch the first nine seasons of “The Walking Dead” for now, on Netflix.

  • making a murderer steven avery binge watch tv show

    "Making a Murderer" (Season 1 on Netflix) - 

    This intensive documentary series covers the story of Steven Avery, who was exonerated of a rape accusation before being arrested for murder. The sorted story is spread out over 10 episodes, raising plenty of questions about whether Avery is guilty along the way.

  • Stranger Things Season 1 netflix weekend binge watch

    "Stranger Things" (Seasons 1-3 on Netflix) - 

    Channeling 1980s sci-fi and supernatural hits like "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," "ET," "Gremlins" and the works of Stephen King, "Stranger Things" perfectly captures an aesthetic of awesome movies gone by. It's also a suitably spooky story of a group of kids who have to go up against monsters, and the government, to save their town.

  • handmaid's tale hulu original series binge

    "The Handmaid's Tale" (Seasons 1-3 on Hulu) - 

    A dystopian world that subjugates women is the setting for "The Handmaid's Tale." The dark series' focus on the feminist struggle of Elizabeth Moss feels especially poignant in today's political climate.

    Hulu
  • Orange is the New Black Season Four

    "Orange is the New Black" (Seasons 1-7 on Netflix) - 

    Netflix's acclaimed show tackles some really tough issues through its prison inmate humor, and there's plenty of "Orange" to watch when you need a deep dive into a show.

  • reese witherspoon big little lies binge watch gallery

    "Big Little Lies" (Seasons 1-2 on HBO Go and HBO Now) - 

    HBO's scandal- and rumor-fueled dark comedy "Big Little Lies" also became a whodunit as its drama unfolded. Its star-studded cast includes Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, Shailene Woodley, Alexander Skarsgard and Laura Dern. 

  • insecure issa rae HBO binge watch

    "Insecure" (Season 1-4 on HBO Go and HBO Now) - 

    Issa Rae channels some hilarious but relatable experiences as she and her friend Molly deal with their own insecurities and flaws in "Insecure." 

  • game of thrones s6e10 daenerys tyrion

    "Game of Thrones" (seasons 1-8 on HBO Now and HBO Go) - 

    A lot of folks weren't too happy with the final season of the huge hit fantasy series, but it was a pleasure to take this ride nonetheless.

Looking for your next obsession? Try these shows

Need something new to watch? You're in the middle of what might be the the most optimal time to watch TV ever (when you can't go out because there's a pandemic). Fortunately, there's no shortage of awesome shows out there across a number of streaming services. Here's every streaming show you should absolutely make time for.

View In Gallery

Sours: https://www.thewrap.com/venture-bros-are-hank-and-dean-destined-to-arch-each-other/

The Venture Bros: How Many Times Have Hank & Dean Died?

Hank and Dean Venture have been through a lot over the course of The Venture. Bros. But how many times have they been killed?

The Venture Bros. has featured a cavalcade of deaths, either doled out by the dangerous heroes or absurd villains. It's such a death-prone universe that even the title characters -- twins Hank and Dean Venture -- have died on multiple occasions, only to be brought back in cloned form. But how many times have the titular Venture Brothers been killed?

The Many Deaths of Hank & Dean

The first season of The Venture Bros. ended on a major plot swerve with "Return to Spider-Skull Island." In the final moments of the episode, Hank and Dean Venture are shot and killed on accident by Henchman 21. Their bodies are discovered by their father Rusty and his bodyguard Brock Samson, who react with little emotion. The Season 2 premiere, "Powerless in the Face of Death," played up the idea that they were actually dead for most of the episode.

But the climax of the episode featured Doctor Orpheus learning from Rusty and Brock that the Hank and Dean he knew weren't the originals. The pair were actually clones of the originals, who were long dead. The "death-prone" Hank and Dean have actually died 29 times between the two of them -- Hank has suffered more than his brother, racking up 15 deaths over Dean's 14. Many of their deaths were shown during an extended montage in "Powerless in the Face of Death"; a handful of additional demises have been teased out across the series.

RELATED: 10 Times The Venture Brothers Outdid What They Lampooned

Some of these fates were the result of the family's adventures. They have been attacked by a giant spider, crushed by a giant robot, beheaded, impaled on spikes, and beaten to death by Scooby-Doo parodies Groovy and Sonny. Many of their deaths can be attributed to accidents: Hank and Dean have killed by setting off an explosion while they tried to smoke a cigarette, shooting each other with arrows, and marooned inside a shrunken submarine injected into their father's body. They have also died in individual accidents: Dean fell onto a pair of scissors while running, and Hank jumped off a rooftop while pretending to be Batman.

Rusty and Brock have been directly responsible for some of the deaths. Both of them were killed when they were sucked into the turbines of the supersonic jet the X-1, attacked by a werewolf Rusty, and burned in their beds when Rusty unknowingly caused a short-circuit. The least-likely cause of death for the brothers was the occasional, genuine accident. That includes a satellite crashing onto Hank, and a gas leak spreading through the Venture Compound and killing them both in their sleep.

RELATED: Venture Bros. Creators Explain Their Unique Take On Supervillains

Can the Venture Bros. Keep on Being Cloned?

A new pair of clones was created at the end of "Powerless in the Face of Death" using a process that's been hinted to have been utilized by Jonas Venture to restore Rusty when he was a child. Since then, neither has had to be cloned again.  That's lucky, as the duo lost the ability to be cloned at the conclusion of the third season.

"The Family That Slays Together, Stays Together" leads to the government agency OSI -- sort of a mash-up between G.I. Joe and Marvel's S.H.I.E.L.D. -- discovering the truth behind Rusty's cloning. A highly illegal process even in the absurd sci-fi world of The Venture Bros., the program is shut down on government orders. Along the way, all of the clones (save for a failed copy of Dean that met his demise in the Season 4 episode "Perchance to Dean") were killed by a malfunctioning robot suit worn by the Monarch.

Although they've been threatened constantly since then, Hank and Dean have always found a way to survive. Even the final episode of Season 7, "The Saphrax Protocol," saw Hank nearly die after being caught in a blizzard. He survived only due to the intervention of the mysterious Scare Bear, who got him to safety so he could be taken to the hospital. But with the end of the season pushing Hank and Dean even further apart, there may come a day when they are actively trying to kill each other.

KEEP READING: Rick And Morty: Why Is The Series So Fixated On Nazis?

ShareTweetEmail

Titans May Have Just Teased a Major Kingdom Come Hero

About The Author
Brandon Zachary (4047 Articles Published)

Brandon Zachary is an Associate Writer with Comic Book Resources and has written for CBR since 2018. He covers breakouts on comics, film, television, video games, and anime. He also conducts industry interviews, is a Rotten Tomatoes certified film critic, and knows SO MUCH about the X-Men. For requests, comments, or to hear his pitch for a third Avatar series that incorporates robots, you can contact him through [email protected]

More From Brandon Zachary
Sours: https://www.cbr.com/the-venture-bros-how-many-times-hank-dean-diead/
  1. Denning farms complaints
  2. Tsp funds ticker
  3. Em uke

'The Venture Bros.' Creators On The Show's Legacy, Its Fans — And Its Cancellation

It's the titular role(s): Hank and Dean Venture starred in The Venture Bros. Cartoon Network hide caption

toggle caption
Cartoon Network

It's the titular role(s): Hank and Dean Venture starred in The Venture Bros.

Cartoon Network

An era of American television ended in September.

Its death came quietly, with news of its passing drowned out from all sides by crumbling institutions, environmental disasters, a historic pandemic and pervasive social unrest. As with all matters of public interest in 2020, its demise was announced via Twitter.

After spanning three presidencies and surviving several cultural sea changes, The Venture Bros. was cancelled after 17 years on the air.

If you've never heard of the animated series despite its longevity, you're far from alone: Neither the half-hour comedy nor its home, Cartoon Network's late night programming block Adult Swim, are often mentioned in the same breath as HBO and AMC or what's conventionally viewed as "prestige TV."

The Venture Bros. began airing its first season in 2004. It followed Dr. Thaddeus S. "Rusty" Venture, his sons Hank and Dean — the titular brothers of the program — and bodyguard Brock Samson on episodic romps in the action-adventure and science fiction vein.

The premise might sound a little more familiar than its actual name: As detailed in the exhaustive tome Go Team Venture!: The Art and Making of The Venture Bros., the show began as a series of doodles by co-creator Jackson Publick in the late '90s. The artist and writer was riffing on the inherent absurdity of dragging children around on globetrotting misadventures, a genre trope memorably depicted in Saturday morning cartoons like Jonny Quest with roots dating back to the paperback tales of Doc Savage and Tom Swift.

When the show's pilot aired in 2003, The Venture Bros. didn't seem all that different from other Adult Swim offerings of the era like Space Ghost Coast to Coast and Sealab 2021, all of which sent up old children's cartoons with the unwanted wisdom and dark humor that inevitably comes with adulthood.

By the end of its first season, there were signs Venture was evolving into something different. Unlike its animated peers — even comedic shows that wrung poignancy from their storylines like The Simpsons or Futurama — the events depicted in its episodes lingered. That is, rather than conforming to the classic sitcom trope of reverting back to square one after each installment, the plots and character nuances had long-term consequences; several seasons could go by before a given episode's ripple effects were truly felt.

"There was just a natural instinct to care about continuity and that anything that actually happened was going to stay happened," Publick says. He and co-writer Doc Hammer wrote all but one of the show's 86 installments spread across seven seasons. "If somebody blows a hole in the wall, it's either being fixed or staying in the wall for the rest of the season. Sometimes we'll do a whole season about renovating a house."

This may seem unremarkable in the streaming era, when the instant availability of shows has made it easier than ever for viewers to consume, memorize and scrutinize the tiniest of details at a whim. But this was still a relative rarity when the series started in the early 2000s — The Sopranos had yet to air its own famous finale, and seminal "golden age" TV shows like Mad Men and Breaking Bad were still years away. Even on its own network, Venture shared the airwaves with goofy, stakes-free 11-minute programs like Aqua Teen Hunger Force and Robot Chicken.

Its intensive continuity left a lot for viewers to sift through: The Venture lore encompasses decades-worth of fictional hijinks intersecting with real historical events, and its cast quickly ballooned in size and never stopped expanding. Many luminaries stopped by to voice guest roles, including J.K. Simmons, Cristin Milioti, Kate McKinnon and Jeffrey Wright.

Legion of Dumb: The Monarch addresses the various villains in The Venture Bros. Cartoon Network hide caption

toggle caption
Cartoon Network

Legion of Dumb: The Monarch addresses the various villains in The Venture Bros.

Cartoon Network

Co-creator Hammer — who recently rewatched the show in light of its cancellation — says despite its outlandish world of super-science and bureaucratic villainy, Venture is "a very realistic show."

"I think from maybe season three or four on, every episode just stopped being joke cannons," Hammer says. "I can't think of one episode that doesn't have a true core of some sort of hurt or want or love or failure inside of it — sometimes as its nutty center. When I rewatched it, I realized it's not just a funny show- it's a show with a lot of truth."

The harsh realities of The Venture Bros. are now accepted as de rigueur in so-called mature American animation. Breakout success Rick and Morty just took home its second Emmy for its own twisted send up of sci-fi clichés, and the Venture family tackled the cascading cause and effects of intergenerational trauma long before BoJack Horseman garnered widespread acclaim for doing the same.

Hammer pegs Archer, which is currently airing its 11th seasonon FXX, as the first time he encountered something on TV that resembled The Venture Bros.

"Archer was the first time somebody took what we were doing and fixed it," Hammer says. Like its forebear, Archer refrains from holding viewers' hands through its callback-heavy humor and often obscure pop culture references.

"A lot of stuff we were doing that wasn't really being done ... I think just became the way people started consuming things," Publick says. "I do think we did a bunch of things first. I don't know — just based on how we were never a breakout hit — how much active influence we had, or if maybe [TheVenture Bros.] made people go 'Oh, you can do that.'"

Besides advancing a particular storytelling style, The Venture Bros. also presaged the influx of nerdy cultural concerns into the American mainstream. Comic book characters that were once considered niche curios like Doctor Strange were parodied on the series long before they became multi-million dollar Hollywood bonanzas. Many of the show's spoofs, including its take on the Sorcerer Supreme himself, developed into fully-realized characters.

Seemingly by accident, Publick and Hammer stumbled upon a vehicle through which they could indulge their every creative whim: The world of The Venture Bros. was one where David Bowie may or may not have been the head of a global supervillain organization, Buddy Holly and the Big Bopper never died and swapped rock 'n' roll for organized evil, and renegade journalist Hunter S. Thompson was a top operative for the show's equivalent to Marvel's S.H.I.E.L.D. agency. By its end, Venture had become an excavation of 20th century pop culture and beyond, all filtered through the distinct perspective of two weirdos who'd somehow found a network willing to nourish their profoundly geeky obsessions.

However, Publick and Hammer feel there's a crucial difference between how The Venture Bros. interpreted geek culture and the current landscape littered with Star Wars sequels and superhero franchises, namely: the weirdness. Using self-admitted "adolescent terminology," Hammer asserts "the geek's stuff got thrown into the hands of the jocks."

"For most of the superhero movies, it's like smarter people tweak the right things to make them a little less disturbingly geeky," Publick says, referencing comic book adaptations' tendency of toning down the more ridiculous elements of the original text.

The Venture Bros., on the other hand, relished in examining how deeply flawed people would respond to living in such a fantastic world. Publick says it would be "a nightmare."

"We were trying to do our own way of making it an adult thing. You're a geek who reads comics and you grow up and it's still a part of your blood — now what?" Hammer says. "That's what The Venture Bros. was: It was for these people who once held that as sacred, and now are ready to really dig into what kind of a miserable life that is."

He and Publick are just now getting used to referring to the show in the past tense. The obsessive and iconoclastic qualities the pair brought to The Venture Bros. that made it memorable may also have contributed to its undoing. The show's production took an infamously long time, with Publick and Hammer involved in essentially every stage of creation. The writer's room was just the two of them, they voiced vast swaths of the characters, and although they had help, they were even involved in direction, editing and sound mixing. There's a reason why only seven seasons were produced across 17 years: These things take time.

(L to R) From Go, Team Venture! to Gone, Team Venture: Brock, Doc, Dean and Hank, of The Venture Bros. Cartoon Network hide caption

toggle caption
Cartoon Network

(L to R) From Go, Team Venture! to Gone, Team Venture: Brock, Doc, Dean and Hank, of The Venture Bros.

Cartoon Network

Referring to their creative partnership as a case of "unibrain," Hammer says he and Publick were so in sync with the show's characters and principles that it would have been impossible to bring more people onboard.

"We didn't have a writer's room; we didn't develop one early enough, we didn't know enough people," Hammer says, noting he and Publick came to instinctually anticipate one another's train of thought.

"If we let anybody else in, Jackson and I would just stand up and go 'Well what show are you even watching?!' [because] they don't know exactly what we're thinking. We know what each other's thinking because we're thinking the same thing; we have very similar responses to who these characters are. And we would kill ourselves — it actually takes a year to break somebody in, to be in a writer's room, and that would throw us more off schedule."

He adds, "Now that we're done, I look back on it as the coolest thing we actually did. I mean, these are the moments in television that are truly unique, that [Muppets creators] Frank Oz, Jim Henson kind of thing, where two people are so in tune they create a universe that is absolutely like nobody else's. So I'm glad we didn't have a writer's room... [a character making a passing reference to punk musician] Stiv Bators would have never made it past the writer's room and now it's canon."

Previously, Publick and Hammer had said it was unlikely that The Venture Bros. would ever close with an explosive, definitive conclusion; the lives of its characters wouldn't stop unfolding when the show ended, viewers just wouldn't be privy to them anymore. Because the show had been greenlit for an eighth season, the last episode that aired in 2018 was explicitly written with the assumption there'd be more. Instead, the show was cancelled earlier this year just as new scripts were being drafted.

Now that the season seven finale has unexpectedly become the show's closing statement, they're navigating the strange prospect of being dissatisfied with their own open ending.

"We would never end the show with one of our characters going away," Hammer says, referencing the last-minute departure of Hank Venture from the core family unit. "We have a character walking away from the Venture family, which is not the way Jackson and I think of the Ventures. There is love and family at the core of all this, and yes [it's] dysfunctional... but love and family is a deep part of our show. And to have somebody flip his gears and just go off in search for himself... that's not the kind of ending we would ever write. That doesn't feel good to me."

The duo maintains hope there'll be more. They spent the better part of two decades nurturing The Venture Bros., and were prepared to say more with it. An official Adult Swim tweet claims they "also want more Venture Bros." while Publick and Hammer say there have been on-again, off-again talks of one last special. But they're pessimistic about its odds of returning as a semi-regular show with proper seasons.

Even with its premature end amid a year from hell, Publick and Hammer are fully appreciative of what The Venture Bros. accomplished and the fiercely devoted fanbase it spawned.

"I am proud that we made something almost entirely on our terms and it worked," Publick says. "I didn't know how much we would mean to a lot of people, and to know that that's from just spilling your guts and trying your hardest to make the thing as good by your standards as possible... means a lot."

"When you're a writer and people give you advice, they say write what you know, which is really shorthand for write who you are: Write your experiences, write your truth, don't second guess other people's expectations, don't take somebody else's voice and use it as your own, write what you truly are," Hammer says. "I have done a lot of things creatively in my life, but The Venture Bros. is the one where we threw out the idea of trying to be anybody else... mainly because we can't! We can't show up at the party as the most popular guy, but we can show up at the party with a car shaped like a butterfly."

But hope springs eternal, and given how miraculous the very existence of The Venture Bros. was, they're not writing anything off.

"In my deepest dreams, I want to be something like Star Trek, where two years later people go 'The fans have spoken — you're coming back!'" Hammer says. "I'd be like hold on, let me dust off my idiocy and get right back to it."

Correction Oct. 21, 2020

An earlier version of this article mistakenly identified the 11th season of FXX's Archer as its final season. It has recently been renewed for a 12th.

Sours: https://www.npr.org/2020/10/19/924214998/the-venture-bros-creators-on-the-show-s-legacy-its-fans-and-its-cancellation
Top 10 Most Hank Hank Moments [Venture Bros]
Warning.gif
Andy in childs play.jpg
This article's content is marked as Mature
The page Hank Venture contains mature content that may include coarse language, sexual references, and/or graphic violent images which may be disturbing to some. Mature pages are recommended for those who are 18 years of age and older.

If you are 18 years or older or are comfortable with graphic material, you are free to view this page. Otherwise, you should close this page and view another page.

Do-Gooder

Full Name

Henry Allen Venture

Powers/Skills

No information

Type of Hero

No information

Henry Allen "Hank" Venture is one of the two titular central protagonists of the Adult Swim television program The Venture Bros., the other being his twin brother Dean. He is voiced by show co-creator Christopher McCulloch.

Appearance

His appearance is similar to that of Fred Jones from Scooby-Doo, (a similarity mentioned by Triana Orpheus). The resemblance mainly stems from his ever-present (except when he wears his Aquaman pajamas, his Venture Industries boilersuit, or his Batman costume) white shirt and neckerchief wardrobe and blond hair, although his hair is much shorter than Fred's (Hank has remarked that he does not particularly like neckerchiefs any longer, but continues to wear them to please his father).

On a minor note, Hank has pointed out that he has a scar from a giant centipede.

The Hank who appeared in the first season was circumcised, while Dean was not; Hank used this as an insult (calling it a "creepy dog dork"). However, the Hank that was activated in "Powerless in the Face of Death" was uncircumcised until the third season episode "Dr. Quymn, Medicine Woman" when he passed through an Amazonian warrior tribe's rite of manhood. In Season 4, Hank is shown to have a drastically altered appearance, having grown his hair out and taking to wearing Brock's old jacket on top of his speed suit; the series creators have stated that this change is due to Hank beginning to age normally in a single body, now that he has no more clone bodies in which to be revived. This was also a way for Hank to model his appearance after his absent hero Brock Samson.

However, after graduating from his learning bed he returns to his original look which he maintains until season 5.

During Season 6, he has adopted a new hairstyle as well wearing a white jacket with the ventures logo and red and white stripes which owes to his new status as a rich kid. Also, after getting a job he wears a pizza delivery boy uniform.

Personality

Hank Venture is the more outgoing, adventurous, and gullible of the two boys. He exhibits a typically 1950s/1960s outlook on life, frequently using such mild interjections as 'golly!' Unlike Dean, he tends to be less naive and more decisive, even if his actions are often mentally unsound and fail to help the current situation. He is prone to flights of fancy; Brock Samson states at one point "it's like he (Hank) channels dead crazy people," to which Dean agrees.

Hank tends to be more keen on adventuring than anyone else in the family, frequently asking to accompany Brock on his various trips ("Home Insecurity") or just hanging out with him ("Eeney, Meeney, Miney... Magic!"). While Brock considers Hank an apt pupil, Hank's exuberance and joy at being included in adventurous undertakings frequently leads to missteps - ranging from slight to fatal - occurring. His best friend is his brother Dean, and the two attempt to live up to the legacy of Team Venture, albeit poorly. Like any other pair of brothers, Hank and Dean argue at times; Hank is the physically stronger of the two and usually overpowers Dean when rough-housing (His father, Dr. Venture, also once mentioned that Hank "get(s) that kind of retard strength when he gets all worked up"). His relationship with his father can border on the nonexistent at times, largely due to Dr. Venture's focus more on Dean and on his own work/money troubles. However it is later admitted by his father that Hank reminds him of himself as when he was young he tried to rebel against his father's legacy as well.

Hank tends to bond well and easily with others: Brock Samson, The Monarch, Sergeant Hatred (after Hatred swore off child molesting), Dermott Fictel, Doctor Girlfriend (who rightly considered Hank capable of driving a getaway car, while dismissing Dean as a "candy-ass"), Henchman 21 (who, before learning of Dr. Venture's cloning facility, believed Hank to be a Highlander-style immortal being based on the number of times 21 had seen him die), and assassin Jean-Claude Le Tueur (whom Hank bonded with while discussing comic books; their plans to go to the San Diego Comic-Con the next year fell through, however, as Brock sliced Le Teur in half). are all characters that Hank has befriended.

Hank has a fascination with Batman and is shown wearing the same Batman costume as a running gag.

Hank has a close relationship with family bodyguard Brock Samson, who treats him with genuine affection and concern. While Dean is apparently being groomed by Dr. Venture to follow in his father and grandfather's footsteps as a super-scientist, Brock has passed on some of his own unique expertise to Hank. He once talked him through the process of defeating several "ghost" pirates via his wrist communicator("Ghosts of the Sargasso"), and tends to think of Hank as his back-up in most violent situations the Ventures get into ("Love-Bheits", "The Buddy System").

There are suggestions from other characters that Hank may be gay, particularly from the Alchemist in "Fallen Arches" and from Triana and Dean in "The Buddy System." In "I Know Why the Caged Bird Kills." Hank insinuates that he may have enjoyed some of Sergeant Hatred's sexual molestation. Additionally, he was almost kissed by Abraham Lincoln, whose spirit had temporarily taken over Dean's body, in "Guess Who's Coming to State Dinner?" and was kissed by Captain Sunshine in "Handsome Ransom." In the instance with Lincoln, which Hank rejected, Lincoln offered the excuse that he was merely reacting to the hormone levels in Dean's teenage body, and the instance with Captain Sunshine was akin to a Mafia-style dismissal rather than a sexual advance. Contrarily, in "Everybody Comes to Hank's" he loses his virginity to Dermott Fictel's biological mother Nikki Fictel. Afterwords, he has his memory erased by S.P.H.I.N.X. after he learns the truth of Dermott's conception as Rusty Venture's bastard son with Nikki Fictel, who was the 15 year old chairperson of Rusty's fan club. He did leave a message on his communicator for himself under the title "Dean Faceplant" explaining that he lost his virginity, but excluded the disgusting parts of sleeping with someone his dad also slept with, to his now memory-erased self. Also in Season 6, he starts a romantic relationship with Sirena Ong, the daughter of the Super-villain Wide Wale.

History and activities on the show

Details of Hank's childhood have been very sparse; in "Careers in Science," Dr. Venture bemoans the "moment of passion" that led to the boys' birth. He, like Dean, regrets knowing nothing of their birth mother and sometimes entertains fantasies about finding her ("Eeney, Meeney, Miney... Magic!" "Hate Floats"). The episode "I Know Why the Caged Bird Kills" had the, now insane, ex-OSI agent Myra Brandish claim to be the boys' mother. Hank resembles her younger appearance, but in a later episode, Dr. Venture's 'death confession' to Sergeant Hatred was that he tricked Myra into thinking she was the boys mother.

Thanks to their father's scientific knowledge, the Hank and Dean that appear in The Venture Bros. have been cloned over 14 times. Venture explains that the boys seem to be rather "death-prone," and as a precaution he keeps a few clones ready at all times for activation. Although Dr. Venture mentions in "Powerless in the Face of Death" that both Hank and Dean's clones were first developed from "toenail clippings," obviously his dead sons' clippings. A flashback montage showing the boys' deaths seems to indicate that Hank may have met an unfortunate end slightly more frequently than Dean.

In the season three episode, The Family That Slays Together, Stays Together (Part I), Hank mentions in a conversation with Le Tueur that he once jumped off his roof pretending to be Batman, then second guesses himself saying "or maybe I dreamt it". This clip was seen in the season two premiere as one of Hanks many deaths, hinting the boys may have some residual memories of their past selves.

While Hank rarely has an episode dedicated solely to himself, he does play at least a prominent part in nearly all episodes. He helped Brock to take down a ship of faux-ghost pirates, led an attack on the "Phantom Spaceman" and attempted to free Brock from Dr. Venture's hypnotic "joy can." He can be counted on for enthusiasm, if not actual intelligence or competence. Unlike Dean, however, Hank noticed that his supposed age did not match the date on his ID card.

One of his larger roles involved his accidental exposure to the "Goliath Serum." This compound, invented by Richard Impossible for use as a weapon, was intended to cause a chain reaction in a living organism that culminates in a massive, devastating explosion proportional to the mass of subject, for example, an ant could destroy a tank, meaning Hank theoretically could have exploded with the force of atom bomb at least. Dr. Venture worked with Pete White, Master Billy Quizboy, and Impossible's wife Sally to produce an antidote. Shortly after being injected with this experimental cure, Hank's symptoms vanished; Dr. Impossible, however, curtly announced that the scientists had only succeeded in inventing ranch dressing. (The serum was apparently only effective on ants, the only creatures on which it had ever been tested.) However, Hank did manifest symptoms of the serum, so it's possible that the supposed "ranch dressing" was really a cure and Dr. Impossible was just jealous of Dr. Venture's success. Richard's wife, Sally Impossible, even claims that this is the reason.

He developed an intense crush on Molotov Cocktease when she guarded the Venture family for several days while Brock was hunting his former mentor and eagerly threw himself into the training the Russian mercenary forced the Ventures to do. His infatuation led him to take down his posters of Mary Lou Retton and Danica Patrick, which worried Dean about the training's effect over his brother. Coming across her then-discarded stiletto heel boots, he nuzzled and rubbed against them, only to be lightly touched in the neck by the blade hidden in the heel, which was coated with a highly effective psychotropic hallucinogen. This caused him to hallucinate that Molotov wanted him to kill his father so they could be together (Dr. Venture had been making his usual pathetic advances to Molotov in the meantime). He picked up a machete and attempted to hack down his father in his lab; but the weapon was made merely of papier-mâché and he was summarily grounded for his attack.

Again he has played minor but important roles in recent episodes, such as attempting to personally crash the wedding between Baron Ünderbheit and his brother while trapped in Ünderland; he also tried to help the spirit of Abraham Lincoln save the current president from being assassinated — although when his brother was possessed by Lincoln, he was nearly kissed, an event that horrified him but prompted Lincoln (who indicated that he had access to Dean's memories) to express knowledge that the boys had experimented with each other previously.

In the fourth season, Hank is shown with his hair grown out and has begun to emulate his absent hero, Brock, growing out his hair, wearing Brock's jacket and gaining greater willingness to learn combat. He has also gained a rebellious streak referring to his father as both a "honky" and the "president of the United States of boogers". He has also grown resentful towards Dean after Dean both gets his own lab in the panic room while Dr. Venture refuses to train Hank for his future career (with his dad and an unbiased delivery man both thinking his future is in box moving). A massive amount of Dean pictures in the attic (put up by a clone), and being blamed for a fire (which said Dean-clone caused), calling the police on his dad (which was actually due to aforementioned deliveryman/amateur psychic) and stealing the people mover to flee to Mexico (which was actually his fault) resulting in a large grounding and a beating when he listened to records. His father has also tried to prevent him from using the bathroom while grounded but this was foiled given the fact the Venture Compound only has one bathroom. He later tried to join S.P.H.I.N.X, but, despite his amazing résumé and incredible skill passing every "test" they threw at him, they found him more of a nuisance than a asset. Though as Brock Samson pointed out, Hank will need to be 18 or older to join S.P.H.I.N.X anyway.

In the fifth season, Hank attempts to join S.P.H.I.N.X once more when it is placed under Gary's control and in the process he gains a power suit which he wears until the episode in which it is stolen by Molotov Cocktease and later destroyed by Brock Samson. In the season's finale, he learns from Dean that they are clones of their original selves but the news does not upset him but rather excites him on the fact to be a member of the Venture family. From this optimistic view, Hank is able to bring his brother out of his depression and make him see that have an amazing family and that everything would be alright.

During the sixth season, Hank along with his family have moved to New York while there Hank quickly gets use to his new life as a rich kid before he is told to get a job from his father. In response, he becomes a pizza delivery boy and has taken an interest in a young woman named Sirena Ong who he successfully asks out on date. In It Happening One Night, Hank goes on a date with Sirena and goes through great lengths to impress her all of which are successful and while swimming in a lake the two share a kiss.

Relationships

Family

Thaddeus Venture

Is Hank's father, throughout most of the show the two are constantly at odds with each other mostly due to Dr. Venture favoring Dean over Hank. In Every Which Way But Zeus, Hank and Sgt. Hatred pretend to hold Dr. Venture hostage and mistakenly call out Dean's name. Hearing this, Dr. Venture screams out to take him instead of Dean which shocks both Hatred and Hank. This causes Hank to reveal that they kidnapped him as well but Thaddeus states they can do whatever they want to him. This revelation causes Hank to become depressed, and before administering "torture" to his father, he asks why Thaddeus loves Dean more than Hank. Thaddeus rebuffs this statement by saying he does love Hank and says he only told them to torture Hank because he knows Hank is tough, like himself, and could endure the torture. Thaddeus explains that Hank, like Thaddeus, didn't want to be what his father wanted either and he is in fact proud of his son's resistance. After this, Hank understood that his father deeply loves and cares for him.

Dean Venture

Dean is hank's twin brother who he is older than by four minutes. Hank and Dean have a stereotypical sibling relationship as they fight and mock each other at times but ultimately are each other's best friend. In the season five finale, Hank asks his brother why he was so depressed to which Dean replies that he learned that he and Hank are clones that have died countless times and are shells of their original selves. Hank thinks this amazing, much to his brother's surprise, Hank explains to Dean that it's yet another reason why its awesome to be a Venture and lightens Dean's mood. In he season six episode It Happening One Night, Dean helps his brother with trying to impress Sirena Ong on their date which was successful.

Brock Samson

Hank openly idolizes Brock and does everything he can to spend time with and learn from him. When Brock left to help SPHINX, Hank was the most affected by his absence, becoming more rebellious by growing out his hair and wearing Brock's signature jacket until he returned. In Season 6, Brock was reassigned to work for the Ventures this caused Hank to be greatly excited as his idol returned to the family.

Sgt. Hatred

Hank was scared of Sergeant Hatred as he molested him and his brother (who holds no recollection due to being passed out from the wine). When Hatred became the new family bodyguard, Hank was openly disdainful of Sgt. Hatred taking over for Brock. But after (accidentally) shooting Hatred in the arm on his command and then having a heart to heart, they've settled in to a good relationship. In O.S.I. Love You, Hatred told Hank it was his destiny to protect his family, before he went out to confront Molotov Cocktease and nearly got himself killed. Hank used his Strength Suit to save Hatred and later explained Hatred was kind of like family and gave him the nickname Uncle Vatred.

Dermott Fictel

Hank and Dermott are close friends. They share many common interests and formed a band. Neither of them are aware they're half-brothers through Dr. Venture and Nikki. When Hank himself had sex with Nikki Fictel and later found out the truth, he was so disgusted he willingly had his memory erased. In Momma's Boys Dermott calls Dr. Venture "Dad" right in front of Hank and Dean, much to their surprise, so it is unknown what their relationship will be like in future episodes but they are great friends so maybe nothing will change.

Romantic

Nikki Fictel

In Everybody Comes to Hank's, Hank is shown to have a crush on Dermott's older sister Nikki. He goes over to their home where they talk with Hank spotting Nikki's Rusty Venture collection from the old TV show. Nikki stated Hank reminded him of the character of the show which Hank denies and calls her words suspicious with Nikki stating she was hiding a big crush on him and the end up having sex. Hank was excited due to losing his virginity however, this was short-lived due to learning (through a spell charm) that as a teenager Nikki once slept with his father leading to the birth of Dermott. Hank was so disgusted that he willingly had his memory erased but not before leaving a message to himself (post memory erased) about the encounter showing that in spite of the disturbing details he enjoyed the sex. In What Color is Your Cleansuit?, while Hank was sleeping in Dermott's room she attempted to seduce him again. However, with his memory erased he had forgotten their encounter and it appears he's lost his crush on her as he was a little disturbed by her advances on him.

Sirena Ong

In Hostile Makeover, Hank had spotted Sirena Ong through the use of Brock's binoculars and saw her diving in a pool and give off an unresponsive look which caused him to attempt to save her only to find out she possessed gills. In Faking Miracles, he once again encounters her and tries to speak with her only for he father's henchmen to attack him until Sirena ordered them off. Hank later delivered a pizza to her apartment but was again chased off by Wide Wale's men. When Hank managed to elude them he found himself on the veranda outside Sirena where they properly got acquainted and hank managed to ask Sirena out on a date after impressing her with his hover car. In Rapacity in Blue, hank is shown nervous about going on his upcoming date with Sirena going to various members of his family on how to not mess up his chances with her. In It Happening One Night, he goes out on his date with her and while having Dean and Pete White help him in various ways he is happy to learn she is actually enjoying herself. While treating her to dinner, he is somewhat jealous that their waiter is her ex-boyfriend but this is brushed aside when they go to the pier where she reveals she is aware of him having friends help him on their date. However, she is flattered that he went to such lengths to just to impress her on the date her, before the two take a swim in the lake. When their bodyguards come to retrieve them, they hide in the lake where they share a kiss before they are taken back to their respective homes. This hints at a future relationship between the two. In Red Means Stop, there is a chalkboard in hank's room with their initals on it, hinting at another step in their relationship.

Mother

  • Dr. Venture has vaguely referred to the boys having an actual mother on a few occasions:
    • In "Careers in Science", Dr. Venture says that he "started" the boys in a moment of passion.
    • In "Mid-Life Chrysalis", the boys directly asked Dr. Venture about their mother. He realizes that he's never really told them about their mother, and begins to tell them about her, but is cut off before he could go into more detail.
    • Also, in "Eeney, Meeney, Miney... Magic!", the image of Dr. Venture makes a reference to their mother while Hank is in the fantasy world of Dr. Venture's "joy can", with Hank hearing her voice off screen. However, this was the idealized fantasy world of Hank's in which he had a mother (with Dean's absence implied), and likely had no basis in real events at all.
    • In "Powerless in the Face of Death", Dr. Venture implies that the boys' mother was ugly. When he mentions losing his virginity at 24, Dr. Orpheus says "That is awful!" (Referring to his continued cloning of the boys). Dr. Venture scoffs, and replies "You didn't even see her, it was horrific."
  • Myra Brandish claimed to be the boys' mother. Season 3 confirmed that she was Thaddeus Venture's bodyguard at approximately the time he was 24, at about the right time frame for the boys to be conceived, and Thaddeus has confirmed he did have sex with her. Myra even bears a close resemblance to Hank.
  • In "Momma's Boys", Dr Venture makes a 'death confession' to Sergeant Hatred telling him that he convinced some (unnamed) woman she was the boys mother and "messed her up pretty bad".  This happens just after the scene where Hank comes to believe that Myra was lying about being his mother. Later he tells Hank he wanted Myra to give the boys free daycare and him free 'daycare'.
  • Also, in the episode Perchance to Dean during a flashback we see Dr. Venture showing Brock the Dean and Hank clones. Upon coming across one that's deformed he says it's a face only a mother can love and "good thing she's not here".
  • Hammer and Publick have confirmed that the boys do, in fact, have a biological mother.

Trivia

  • Hank is not allowed to use the oven without supervision as per =Everybody Comes To Hank's.
  • In Love-Bheits, it is revealed that Hank has been taking Judo lessons from Brock
  • In his bedroom in the Venture Compound, he has a toy car that looks identical to Brock's car, Adriene.

Navigation

Sours: https://hero.fandom.com/wiki/Hank_Venture

Brothers hank venture

Henry Allen "Hank" Venture is one of the two titular central protagonists (alongside Dean Venture) of the 2003 Adult Swim television program The Venture Bros. He is voiced by show co-creator Christopher McCulloch.

Appearance

His appearance is similar to that of Fred Jones from Scooby-Doo, (a similarity mentioned by Triana Orpheus). The resemblance mainly stems from his ever-present (except when he wears his Aquaman pajamas, his Venture Industries boilersuit, or his Batman costume) white shirt and neckerchief wardrobe and blond hair, although his hair is much shorter than Fred's (Hank has remarked that he does not particularly like neckerchiefs any longer, but continues to wear them to please his father).

On a minor note, Hank has pointed out that he has a scar from a giant centipede.

The Hank who appeared in the first season was circumcised, while Dean was not; Hank used this as an insult (calling it a "creepy dog dork"). However, the Hank that was activated in Powerless in the Face of Death was uncircumcised until the third season episode Dr. Quymn, Medicine Woman when he passed through an Amazonian warrior tribe's rite of manhood. In Season 4, Hank is shown to have a drastically altered appearance, having grown his hair out and taking to wearing Brock's old jacket on top of his speed suit; the series creators have stated that this change is due to Hank beginning to age normally in a single body, now that he has no more clone bodies in which to be revived (see below).[1] This was also a way for Hank to model his appearance after his absent hero Brock Samson.

However, after graduating from his learning bed he returns to his original look which he maintains until Season 5.

During Season 6, he has adopted a new hairstyle as well as wearing a white jacket with the Venture logo and red and white stripes which owes to his new status as a rich kid. Also, after getting a job he wears a pizza delivery boy uniform.

Personality

Hank Venture is the more outgoing, adventurous, and gullible of the two boys. He exhibits a typically 1950s/1960s outlook on life, frequently using such mild interjections as 'golly!' Unlike Dean, he tends to be less naive and more decisive, even if his actions are often mentally unsound and fail to help the current situation. He is prone to flights of fancy; Brock Samson states at one point "it's like he (Hank) channels dead crazy people," to which Dean agrees.

Hank tends to be more keen on adventuring than anyone else in the family, frequently asking to accompany Brock on his various trips[2] or just hanging out with him.[3] While Brock considers Hank an apt pupil, Hank's exuberance and joy at being included in adventurous undertakings frequently leads to missteps - ranging from slight to fatal - occurring. His best friend is his brother Dean, and the two attempt to live up to the legacy of Team Venture, albeit poorly. Like any other pair of brothers, Hank and Dean argue at times; Hank is the physically stronger of the two and usually overpowers Dean when rough-housing. His father, Dr. Venture, also once mentioned that Hank "get(s) that kind of retard strength when he gets all worked up". His relationship with his father can border on the nonexistent at times, largely due to Dr. Venture's focus more on Dean and on his own work/money troubles. However it is later admitted by his father that Hank reminds him of himself as when he was young he also tried to rebel against his father's legacy.

Hank tends to bond well and easily with others: Brock Samson, The Monarch, Sergeant Hatred (after Hatred swore off child molesting), Dermott Fictel, The Alchemist, Doctor Girlfriend (who rightly considered Hank capable of driving a getaway car, while dismissing Dean as a "candy-ass"), Henchman 21 (who, before learning of Dr. Venture's cloning facility, believed Hank to be a Highlander-style immortal being based on the number of times 21 had seen him die), and assassin Jean-Claude Le Tueur (whom Hank bonded with while discussing comic books; their plans to go to the San Diego Comic-Con the next year fell through, however, as Brock sliced Le Tueur in half) are all characters that Hank has befriended.

Hank has a fascination with Batman and is shown wearing the same Batman costume as a running gag that culminates in him forming the persona of The Bat.

Hank has a close relationship with family bodyguard Brock Samson, who treats him with genuine affection and concern. While Dean is apparently being groomed by Dr. Venture to follow in his father and grandfather's footsteps as a super-scientist, Brock has passed on some of his own unique expertise to Hank. He once talked him through the process of defeating several "ghost" pirates via his wrist communicator[4], and tends to think of Hank as his back-up in most violent situations the Ventures get into.[5][6] Hank on his part idolizes Brock and seeks to be just like him often imitating his abilities, most of the time failing.

There are suggestions from other characters that Hank may be gay, particularly from The Alchemist in Fallen Arches and from Triana and Dean in The Buddy System. In I Know Why the Caged Bird Kills Hank insinuates that he may have enjoyed some of Sergeant Hatred's sexual molestation. Additionally, he was almost kissed by Abraham Lincoln, whose spirit had temporarily taken over Dean's body, in Guess Who's Coming to State Dinner? and was kissed by Captain Sunshine in Handsome Ransom. In the instance with Lincoln, which Hank rejected, Lincoln offered the excuse that he was merely reacting to the hormone levels in Dean's teenage body, and the instance with Captain Sunshine was akin to a Mafia-style dismissal rather than a sexual advance. Contrarily, in Everybody Comes to Hank's he loses his virginity to Dermott Fictel's biological mother Nikki Fictel. Afterwards, he learns the truth of Dermott's conception as Rusty Venture's bastard son with Nikki Fictel, who was the 15 year old chairperson of Rusty's fan club, and he enjoyed the encounter before he learned the truth and subsequently has his memory of the incident erased by S.P.H.I.N.X. He did leave a message on his communicator for himself under the title "Dean Faceplant" explaining that he lost his virginity, but excluded the disgusting parts of sleeping with someone his dad also slept with, to his now memory-erased self. Also in Season 6, he starts a romantic relationship with Sirena Ong, the daughter of the supervillain Wide Wale, and dates her until he learns that she slept with his brother Dean.

History and activities on the show

Details of Hank's childhood have been very sparse; in Careers in Science, Dr. Venture bemoans the "moment of passion" that led to the boys' birth. He, like Dean, regrets knowing nothing of their birth mother and sometimes entertains fantasies about finding her.[3][7] The episode I Know Why the Caged Bird Kills had the (now insane) ex-OSI agent Myra Brandish claim to be the boys' mother. Hank resembles her younger appearance, but in a later episode, Dr. Venture's 'death confession' to Sergeant Hatred was that he tricked Myra into thinking she was the boys' mother.

Thanks to their father's scientific knowledge, the Hank and Dean that appear in The Venture Bros. have been cloned over 14 times. Venture explains that the boys seem to be rather "death-prone," and as a precaution he keeps a few clones ready at all times for activation. Although Dr. Venture mentions in Powerless in the Face of Death that both Hank and Dean's clones were first developed from "toenail clippings," they were obviously his dead sons' clippings. A flashback montage showing the boys' deaths seems to indicate that Hank may have met an unfortunate end slightly more frequently than Dean.

In the season three episode The Family That Slays Together, Stays Together (Part I) Hank mentions in a conversation with Le Tueur that he once jumped off his roof pretending to be Batman, then second guesses himself saying "or maybe I dreamt it". This clip was seen in the season two premiere as one of Hank's many deaths, hinting the boys may have some residual memories of their past selves.

While Hank rarely has an episode dedicated solely to himself, he does play at least a prominent part in nearly all episodes. He helped Brock to take down a ship of faux-ghost pirates, led an attack on the "Phantom Spaceman" and attempted to free Brock from Dr. Venture's hypnotic "joy can." He can be counted on for enthusiasm, if not actual intelligence or competence. Unlike Dean, however, Hank noticed that his supposed age did not match the date on his ID card.

One of his larger roles involved his accidental exposure to the "Goliath Serum."[8] This compound, invented by Richard Impossible for use as a weapon, was intended to cause a chain reaction in a living organism that culminates in a massive, devastating explosion proportional to the mass of subject, for example, an ant could destroy a tank, meaning Hank theoretically could have exploded with the force of atom bomb at least. Dr. Venture worked with Pete White, Master Billy Quizboy, and Impossible's wife Sally to produce an antidote. Shortly after being injected with this experimental cure, Hank's symptoms vanished; Dr. Impossible, however, curtly announced that the scientists had only succeeded in inventing ranch dressing. (The serum was apparently only effective on ants, the only creatures on which it had ever been tested.) However, Hank did manifest symptoms of the serum, so it's possible that the supposed "ranch dressing" was really a cure and Dr. Impossible was just jealous of Dr. Venture's success. Richard's wife, Sally Impossible, even claims that this is the reason.

He developed an intense crush on Molotov Cocktease when she guarded the Venture family for several days while Brock was hunting his former mentor and eagerly threw himself into the training the Russian mercenary forced the Ventures to do. His infatuation led him to take down his posters of Mary Lou Retton and Danica Patrick, which worried Dean about the training's effect over his brother. Coming across her then-discarded stiletto heel boots, he nuzzled and rubbed against them, only to be lightly touched in the neck by the blade hidden in the heel, which was coated with a highly effective psychotropic hallucinogen. This caused him to hallucinate that Molotov wanted him to kill his father so they could be together (Dr. Venture had been making his usual pathetic advances to Molotov in the meantime). He picked up a machete and attempted to hack down his father in his lab; but the weapon was made merely of papier-mâché and he was summarily grounded for his attack.

Again he has played minor but important roles in recent episodes, such as attempting to personally crash the wedding between Baron Ünderbheit and his brother while trapped in Ünderland; he also tried to help the spirit of Abraham Lincoln save the current president from being assassinated — although when his brother was possessed by Lincoln, he was nearly kissed, an event that horrified him but prompted Lincoln (who indicated that he had access to Dean's memories) to express knowledge that the boys had experimented with each other previously.

In the fourth season, Hank is shown with his hair grown out and has begun to emulate his absent hero, Brock, growing out his hair, wearing Brock's jacket and gaining greater willingness to learn combat. He has also gained a rebellious streak referring to his father as both a "honky" and the "president of the United States of boogers". He has also grown resentful towards Dean after Dean both gets his own lab in the panic room while Dr. Venture refuses to train Hank for his future career (with his dad and an unbiased delivery man both thinking his future is in box moving). A massive amount of Dean pictures in the attic (put up by a clone), and being blamed for a fire (which said Dean-clone caused), calling the police on his dad (which was actually due to aforementioned deliveryman/amateur psychic) and stealing the people mover to flee to Mexico (which was actually his fault) resulting in a large grounding and a beating when he listened to records. His father has also tried to prevent him from using the bathroom while grounded but this was foiled given the fact the Venture Compound only has one bathroom. He later tried to join S.P.H.I.N.X, but, despite his amazing résumé and incredible skill passing every "test" they threw at him, they found him more of a nuisance than a asset. Though as Brock Samson pointed out, Hank will need to be 18 or older to join S.P.H.I.N.X anyway.

In the fifth season, Hank attempts to join S.P.H.I.N.X once more when it is placed under Gary's control and in the process he gains a power suit which he wears until the episode in which it is stolen by Molotov Cocktease and later destroyed by Brock Samson. In the season's finale, he learns from Dean that they are clones of their original selves but the news does not upset him but rather excites him on the fact to be a member of the Venture family. From this optimistic view, Hank is able to bring his brother out of his depression and make him see that have an amazing family and that everything would be alright.

During the sixth season, Hank along with his family have moved to New York while there Hank quickly gets use to his new life as a rich kid before he is told to get a job from his father. In response, he becomes a pizza delivery boy and has taken to using a hover car called the Go-Pod to as his vehicle. Hank takes interest in Sirena Ong, the daughter of the villain Wide Wale and successfully asks out on date after impressing her with the Go-Pod.

In It Happening One Night, Hank goes on a date with Sirena and goes through great lengths to impress her all of which are successful and while swimming in a lake the two share a kiss.

In the seventh season, Hank is still the same as before and in The Rorqual Affair, he and Sirena are now officially a couple, thought they try to hide their relationship from Wide Wale. They attempt to have sex with little success, as the inexperienced Hank has performance issues from overexcitement. Very soon, Hank is fired from his job because of Wide Wale having connections at Vincenzo's and the Whale Lice destroy his Go-Pod, spray painting a warning on it for Hank to stay away from Sirena.

In The Inamorata Consequence, Hank is bothered by an OSI agent who turns out to be Dermott Fictel and the latter reveals "his father" put in a recommendation for Dermott to join the OSI. Hank seems unaware that Dermott is referring to their shared father, Dr. Venture, and asks if his father had pull with the OSI because he was "in black ops".

During The Forecast Manufacturer, Hank tries to text his girlfriend Sirena but she doesn't pick up. Despite being told to give her space, Hank decides to visit her but suffers a concussion upon hitting his head on a lamppost and passes out in the snow. Hank is found by a person wearing a bear costume and taken to the store where he gets food before being brought to a dorm. Hank is now dazed from his injury but finds Dean's room and walks in to find Sirena cheating on him with his brother. Due to his injury, Hank is calm in the confrontation. He is hurt when Dean confirms the sight and soon Sirena does as well, also feeling bad. After Dean and Sirena are startled to see the figure who brought Hank to the dorm, Hank is relieved that it was confirmed as real before he passes out from his experience.

During The Saphrax Protocol, Hank has been hospitalized in a coma, with a very distressed Dean staying by his side. In Hank's comatose state, Hanks finds himself in a purgatory-like world that resembles the ice planet Hoth from The Empire Strikes Back crossed with the planet from the film Barbarella. He encounters his godfather,The Action Man, who is comatose from a stroke, and the two have a long heart-to-heart conversation about love, obsession, and growing up. In the process The Action Man reveals to Hank that his real mother was an actress named Bobbi Saint Simone. He says Dr. Venture became obsessive and smothered her until she stopped taking his calls, changed her name, and moved to another state. They are captured by a wampa but rescued by Dr. Phineas Phage, who is also comatose from a teleporter-related accident. After Phage delivers them to the pool of Matmos at the Action Man's behest, Hank decides he must dive in the pool, both as a way to escape purgatory and as a coming-of-age ritual. Hank wakens from the coma while Dean is sleeping and leaves Stuyvesant University Medical Center. Hank slips into a nearby crowd and does an internal monologue reminiscent of the final scene of the 1990 film Darkman. Hank seems determined to grow up and find his identity, yet he wears a Batman mask underneath the hood of his coat, hinting that we may see the return of The Bat.

Relationships

Family

Thaddeus Venture

Is Hank's father, throughout most of the show the two are constantly at odds with each other mostly due to Dr. Venture favoring Dean over Hank. In Any Which Way But Zeus, Hank and Sgt. Hatred pretend to hold Dr. Venture hostage and mistakenly call out Dean's name. Hearing this, Dr. Venture screams out to take him instead of Dean which shocks both Hatred and Hank. This causes Hank to reveal that they kidnapped him as well but Thaddeus states they can do whatever they want to him. This revelation causes Hank to become depressed, and before administering "torture" to his father, he asks why Thaddeus loves Dean more than Hank. Thaddeus rebuffs this statement by saying he does love Hank and says he only told them to torture Hank because he knows Hank is tough, like himself, and could endure the torture. Thaddeus explains that Hank, like Thaddeus, didn't want to be what his father wanted either and he is in fact proud of his son's resistance. After this, Hank understood that his father deeply loves and cares for him.

Since that point Hank has chosen to completely reject his science inheritance and instead, follow his dreams of becoming a great agent like Brock. He still harbors some feelings of rejection as shown in season seven. Dr. Venture for his part demands that Hank must stand on his own two feet and get a job if he doesn't go to college seemingly pushing hank to branch out on his own.

Dean Venture

Dean is Hank's twin brother who he is older than by four minutes. Hank and Dean have a stereotypical sibling relationship as they fight and mock each other at times but ultimately are each other's best friend. They are often seen doing almost everything together and fare poorly on their own. In the season five finale, Hank asks his brother why he was so depressed to which Dean replies that he learned that he and Hank are clones that have died countless times and are shells of their original selves. Hank thinks this amazing, much to his brother's surprise, Hank explains to Dean that it's yet another reason why its awesome to be a Venture and lightens Dean's mood. In the season six episode It Happening One Night, Dean helps his brother with trying to impress Sirena Ong on their date which was successful.

During The Forecast Manufacturer, it is shown he has betrayed Hank by sleeping with Sirena. It is unknown what led to this occurring. Dean feels immence guilt over this betrayal and is seen begging a comatose Hank for forgiveness.

Jonas Venture Sr.

Jonas Sr. is Hank's paternal grandfather. Hank never met him but always wanted to after hearing that he was famous.

In Arrears in Science, Dean informs Hank of what occurred in their home and told him that their grandfather was still alive, to Hank's excitement. Hank wanted to meet his grandfather though Dean talked him out of it.

Brock Samson

Hank openly idolizes Brock and does everything he can to spend time with and learn from him. When Brock left to help S.P.H.I.N.X., Hank was the most affected by his absence, becoming more rebellious by growing out his hair and wearing Brock's signature jacket until he returned. In Season 6, Brock was reassigned to work for the Ventures. This caused Hank to be greatly excited as his idol returned to the family.

Sergeant Hatred

Hank was initially scared of Sergeant Hatred as he once molested him and his brother (Dean holds no recollection due to being passed out from the wine). When Hatred became the new family bodyguard, Hank was openly disdainful of Sgt. Hatred taking over for Brock. But after (accidentally) shooting Hatred in the arm on his command and then having a heart to heart with thim, the two settled into a good relationship. In O.S.I. Love You, Hatred told Hank it was his destiny to protect his family, before he went out to confront Molotov Cocktease and nearly got himself killed. Hank used his Strength Suit to save Hatred and later explained Hatred was kind of like family, giving him the nickname Uncle Vatred.

Dermott Fictel

Hank and Dermott are close friends. They share many common interests and formed a band called Shallow Gravy. Neither of them are aware they're half-brothers through Dr. Venture and Nikki. When Hank himself had sex with Nikki Fictel and later found out the truth, he was so disgusted he willingly had his memory erased. In Momma's Boys Dermott calls Dr. Venture "Dad" right in front of Hank and Dean, much to their surprise. In The Inamorata Consequence Dermott reveals that he is now a Private Second Class in the OSI, having been recruited after his father pulled some strings for him - in exchange for never talking about that he is related to his father. Hank doesn't realize that Dermott is referring to Dr. Venture assuming it was some guy in black ops whom Dermott had previously told Hank was his real father.

Romantic

Nikki Fictel

In Everybody Comes to Hank's, Hank is shown to have a crush on Dermott's older sister Nikki. He goes over to their home where they talk with Hank spotting Nikki's Rusty Venture collection from the old TV show. Nikki stated Hank reminded him of the character of the show which Hank denies and calls her words suspicious with Nikki stating she was hiding a big crush on him and they end up having sex. Hank was excited due to losing his virginity however, this was short-lived due to learning (through a spell charm) that as a teenager Nikki once slept with his father leading to the birth of Dermott. Hank was so disgusted that he willingly had his memory erased but not before leaving a message to himself (post memory erased) about the encounter showing that in spite of the disturbing details he enjoyed the sex. In What Color is Your Cleansuit?, while Hank was sleeping in Dermott's room she attempted to seduce him again. However, with his memory erased he had forgotten their encounter and it appears he's lost his crush on her as he was a little disturbed by her advances on him.

Sirena Ong

In Hostile Makeover, Hank had spotted Sirena Ong through the use of Brock's binoculars and saw her diving in a pool and give off an unresponsive look which caused him to attempt to save her only to find out she possessed gills. In Faking Miracles, he once again encounters her and tries to speak with her only for he father's henchmen to attack him until Sirena ordered them off. Hank later delivered a pizza to her apartment but was again chased off by Wide Wale's men. When Hank managed to elude them he found himself on the veranda outside Sirena where they properly got acquainted and hank managed to ask Sirena out on a date after impressing her with his hover car. In Rapacity in Blue, Hank is shown nervous about going on his upcoming date with Sirena going to various members of his family on how to not mess up his chances with her.

In It Happening One Night, he goes out on his date with her and while having Dean and Pete White help him in various ways he is happy to learn she is actually enjoying herself. While treating her to dinner, he is somewhat jealous that their waiter is her ex-boyfriend but this is brushed aside when they go to the pier where she reveals she is aware of him having friends help him on their date. However, she is flattered that he went to such lengths to just to impress her on the date her, before the two take a swim in the lake. When their bodyguards come to retrieve them, they hide in the lake where they share a kiss before they are taken back to their respective homes. This hints at a future relationship between the two. In Red Means Stop, there is a chalkboard in Hank's room with their initials on it, hinting at another step in their relationship.

As seen in The Rorqual Affair, they are now a couple and are sexually active (though Hank is having performance issues that preclude actual intercourse.) They initially hide their relationship from Wide Wale, who finds out about it from Rocco and confronts Sirena. Wide Wale and his men didn't approve of their relationship and got Hank fired from his job after beating up his boss and damaging his hover car. Later, Hank tried to prove himself worthy of her by impressing her father as wannabe supervillain Enrico Matassa; he nearly succeeded but failed in the end.

During The Forecast Manufacturer, it is shown he has started to grow obsessed with Sirena as she wouldn't answer his texts and he even traveled through snow to head for her college. Hank got a concussion and was led by the mysterious Scare Bear to Dean's dorm room only to find Sirena cheating on him with his brother. She tried to explain the circumstances to the dazed Hank; he is too out of it to understand but vaguely sees what's happening. It is unknown where their status stands now.

Mother

  • Dr. Venture has vaguely referred to the boys having an actual mother on a few occasions:
    • In Careers in Science, Dr. Venture says that he "started" the boys in a moment of passion.[9]
    • In Mid-Life Chrysalis, the boys directly asked Dr. Venture about their mother. He realizes that he's never really told them about their mother, and begins to tell them about her, but is cut off before he could go into more detail.[10]
    • Also, in Eeney, Meeney, Miney... Magic!, the image of Dr. Venture makes a reference to their mother while Hank is in the fantasy world of Dr. Venture's "joy can", with Hank hearing her voice off screen. However, this was the idealized fantasy world of Hank's in which he had a mother (with Dean's absence implied), and likely had no basis in real events at all.[3]
    • In Powerless in the Face of Death, Dr. Venture implies that the boys' mother was ugly. When he mentions losing his virginity at 24, Dr. Orpheus says "That is awful!" (referring to his continued cloning of the boys). Dr. Venture scoffs, and replies "You didn't even see her, it was horrific."[11]
  • Myra Brandish claimed to be the boys' mother. Season 3 confirmed that she was Thaddeus Venture's bodyguard at approximately the time he was 24, at about the right time frame for the boys to be conceived, and Thaddeus has confirmed he did have sex with her. Myra even bears a close resemblance to Hank.
  • In Momma's Boys, Dr Venture makes a "death confession" to Sergeant Hatred telling him that he convinced Myra she was the boys' mother and "messed her up pretty bad". This happens just after the scene where Hank comes to believe that Myra was lying about being his mother. Later he tells Hank he wanted Myra to give the boys free daycare and him free "daycare".
  • Also, in the episode Perchance to Dean during a flashback we see Dr. Venture showing Brock the Dean and Hank clones. Upon coming across one that's deformed he says it's a face only a mother can love and "good thing she's not here".
  • Hammer and Publick have confirmed that the boys do, in fact, have a biological mother.[12]
  • While unconscious in Stuyvesant University Medical Center, Hank meets his godfather The Action Man in a purgatory-like world and learns that his and Dean's real mother was an actress named Bobbi Saint Simone. Dr. Venture apparently became obsessive and smothered her until she stopped taking his calls, changed her name, and moved to another state.[13]

Trivia

  • Hank is not allowed to use the oven without supervision as per Everybody Comes To Hank's.
  • In Love-Bheits, it is revealed that Hank has been taking Judo lessons from Brock.
  • In his bedroom in the Venture Compound, he has a toy car that looks identical to Brock's car, Adriene.
  • Hank's jacket that he wears throughout Season Six is a reference to the jacket that's seen in the 1971 Steve McQueen film Le Mans.

Episode Appearances

Season 1

Season 2

Season 3

Season 4

Season 5

Season 6

Season 7

Gallery

Shot1447654

Hank (growing out his hair) wearing Brock Samson's jacket.

2 (2)

Hank Venture in Season 4.

Hankanddeandeath

One of the many deaths of the Venture brothers.

TVB S05E08 Devils Grip

Hank pretending to be a delinquent.

References

Sours: https://venturebrothers.fandom.com/wiki/Hank_Venture
Consoling Hank - The Venture Bros. - Adult Swim

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the Season 7 finale of “The Venture Bros.”)

“The Venture Bros.” has changed quite a bit over seven seasons and 15 years, but nowhere is that more clear than in the story of its title characters, brothers Hank and Dean. And in season finale, “The Saphrax Protocol, “their relationship took a turn that hints at what could turn into the show’s most tragic story to date: The Venture Bros. as arch enemies.

It became clear midway through Season 7 that, while Hank and Dean didn’t get as much screen time as they might have in previous seasons, the emotional heart of the series was with them. Finally, the Venture brothers are being allowed to grow up. But with growing up comes the ability of Dean and Hank to hurt each other.

Dean, especially.

In the penultimate episode of the season, “The Forecast Manufacturer,” Dean committed a huge act of betrayal: He slept with Sarina (Cristin Milioti), Hank’s girlfriend. And when Hank caught Dean and Sarina in the act, he had a stroke from the shock, and went into a coma. So he remains as the episode begins, stuck in a heavily metaphorical comatose dream influenced by a combination of “Barbarella” and “The Empire Strikes Back,” while Dean keeps a vigil for him at his hospital bed.

Also Read:'Venture Bros' Finale Changes Everything Between Rusty and the Monarch

For Dean, Hank’s near-death is a huge wakeup call, and so it is that he spends the episode explaining to his comatose brother all the ways he has been terrible to him over the years. There’s a lot he confesses to, but the main thing is that Dean admits he’s worried and depressed about the distance that’s grown between them — distance Dean reveals he was as much responsible for as Hank was. That led him to sleep with Serina in hopes of breaking her and Hank up. Dean even confesses he’s jealous that Hank is the kind of person who feels no shame walking around in public wearing a “Batman” mask.

Hank, meanwhile, realizes during his comatose dream that he has been avoiding even the beginnings of adulthood, by becoming obsessed with his girlfriend and living a kind of fantasy world in real life to avoid it. This wakes Hank up from his coma, ironically just as Dean has fallen asleep in the hospital. Dean wakes up to learn Hank checked himself out, and in the episode’s final moments, Dean scrambles outside looking desperately for Hank, but to no avail.

In voice over narration that, by the way, totally parodies the end of “Darkman,” Hank disappears into a crowd, proclaiming his intent to go find himself, to finally grow up. As he walks into the distance, he turns around for one last look back, this time covering his face… with that “Batman” mask.

Also Read:'The Venture Bros': Wait, Is Time Travel at the Center of Everything?

Throughout the season, Hank (Christopher McCulloch) and Dean (Michael Sinterniklaas) took serious, if tentative, steps into adulthood, although the distance they covered wasn’t equal. They’ve both been exposed to countless dangers since childhood, and as young adults have reacted in dramatically different ways.

Hank, still content to indulge in childlike bouts of make-believe, is more or less at home in the weird world of costumed villains and killer spies in which the Ventures live. The madness of it all rolls off his back when he isn’t actively trying to take part, which to his disappointment he’s constantly forbidden from doing. Worse, he knows he’s clearly not his father’s favorite, knowledge that has depressed and alienated him.

Dean, meanwhile, has some unwanted knowledge of his own that Hank doesn’t. For instance, of his father, Rusty Venture’s ill-advised dalliance with the underage president of the Rusty Venture fan club, which resulted in the secret birth of Hank and Dean’s half-brother, actually Hank’s friend Dermot. Dean also knows the horrifying truth about himself: he and Hank are actually clones, activated after their originals were killed, with all the originals’ backed-up memories uploaded into their brains. and what’s worse, they’re the 14th such clones — they’re actually at least three years (at least) older than they think they are, because of lengthy gaps between clone activations. And by this point in his life, he’s very much over all of it.

And that’s not including the fact that Rusty has ignored both brothers’ natures: Hank, who craves the approval and companionship of his father, but is rejected as unworthy; and Dean, who wants no part of his father’s life or the family business at all, and whose objections are ignored.

In the end, the brothers are now separated, not only by an emotional gulf, but by a physical one.

Also Read:'The Venture Bros': Yup, That Clown's Voice Was Exactly Who You Thought It Was

So what does this distance mean for Season 8? Their drama stems from their attempts to avoid the choices set for them by their father. And it’s very easy to see how those attempts will lead them down that exact path, by becoming each other’s opposite.

Hank seems very intent on living the superhero life he’s always envisioned for himself — he’s even wearing a Batman Halloween mask in his final appearance in Season 7. He could easily become a “protagonist,” to use the official terminology for “Hero” of the Guild of Calamitous Intent.

Could Dean, meanwhile, become Hank’s antagonist? In a lot of ways, Dean already has. And that’s not accounting for their father, Rusty, who has never been able to pull himself free of the superhero life his father Jonas (Paul Boocock) created for him. And despite his complaints, Rusty has been pushing Dean into that life, just as Jonas pushed Rusty into it. The ruts are well-worn, and they’re also all Dean and Hank have ever known.

To see Dean and Hank stuck forever on the hamster wheel of “costumed aggression,” constantly angry at and jealous of each other for the rest of their lives, would be fitting with the show’s hilarious but often difficult looks toxic masculinity, parenthood, failure, and whether people can change for the better. It’d certainly make for some great comedy to see Hank’s idea of Batman face off against Dean’s idea of, say, Lex Luthor. And considering the show has teased that there might be a new set of Venture brothers to fulfill the title of the show, contrasting that conflict with this new one would be a great touch.

But that, really, would be the most tragic part of a show that’s often already pretty tragic. With the story of Hank and Dean, “The Venture Bros.” is exploring coming of age through its particularly warped lens, but it’s pitting the Ventures against history, inertia, and trauma. The big question of Season 8 isn’t whether Rusty and the Monarch are brothers, or what will become of the Guild of Calamitous Intent. It’s whether Hank and Dean can become men, what men they’ll become, and whether they’ll be able to stop hurting each other along the way.

Read original story ‘Venture Bros': Are Hank and Dean Destined to Arch Each Other? At TheWrap

Sours: https://www.yahoo.com/news/venture-bros-apos-hank-dean-060836498.html

You will also be interested:

I divorced. Nearly. Now I will live here, do you mind. After all, this is your apartment too, - Jumping out of the helicopter, I immediately rushed to the hostel to change.



14404 14405 14406 14407 14408